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1600 Games XXII: Anny's double victory

Anny considered her marriage successful. There was no question that Mitty met her mom's primary criterion for a mate: He was a good provider, even a excellent one.

 

But despite that cache of cash in the Caymans (cache of cash? cash of cache? she always got that one mixed up) and all that it would buy, she felt something was missing, something that she saw close up in 'Chelle and Bar. He wasn't the lord and master in the big house on Pennsy Ave.; in their relationship, he was the first among equals -- better yet the joint first. She loved her Mitty dearly, but had always played second fiddle; on that awful night in November, when they learned they were not going to move to 1600, he'd called her “the woman at my side.” Might as well have said “little woman.”

 

Since then Anny had been seeking ways to express herself. One was Rafalca, of course, but dressage and show jumping fell far short of the prestige given that racehorse in the movie. What was its name? Fishcake? Seacookie? Dogbiscuit?

 

Maybe bridge would provide the opportunity, she thought as she sat opposite her other half. Was it possible that the hand that would change everything had just been dealt?

 

Mitty
A97
AKQ
8765
K32
Anny
K642
109876
AK
J10
W
N
E
S
1
P
2
P
2
P
4
P
P
P

 

The bidding was simple enough. After Anny had opened 1 (on advice of his pal Rush, Mitty had ruled out Flannery, together with global warming, alternative energy and evolution. as radical leftist propaganda), her husband propelled her to the heart game after an intermediate response of 2 and her (non-reverse by definition) 2. The opening lead was a small club; Anny concluded that the contract depended on the black suits. There were one or two clubs to lose, and the same number of spades depending on whether that suit divided 3-3 or 4-2.

 

Anny played small from dummy and was relieved to see East win with the A, not the queen. “Almost home,” she thought. “Now I can afford two spade losers.”

After cashing one of dummy's top trumps, something made her stop.

 

At this point, she mused, her husband would proceed to draw trumps, just as he had been coached to do. Even Rush wouldn't have the guts to disagree. Her mind raced ahead, seaching for pitfalls. Was there a way to protect against bad splits in both majors?

 

There are those who were in the room at the time who swear that Anny almost whinnied, like one of her horses, when the solution dawned on her. She could protect against a possible spade loser by ruffing the fourth card in that suit with one of dummy's master trumps. That would give up an overtrick if the trump jack turned out to be doubleton. But this was winner take all; just as in Florida in 2000, it was the victory that counted and not way you got there.

 

The play went quickly. Anny cashed the ace and king of spades and was pleased to see West's Q, an indication that the suit had not divided evenly. That indication was confirmed on the next trick, as RHO discarded a club on the third heart. A club to dummy and a diamond to hand allowed Anny to ruff the fourth spade with the Q, a master trump. Anny could not hold back her smile when East failed to follow to the K on the next trick; trumps had indeed divided 4-1.

 

The rest was simple. Anny entered hand with the remaining high diamond and claimed. “You get the J, I get the rest,” she said.

 

She turned triumphantly to her husband. “John Bolton would never have suggested that line of play, would he darling? Guess that proves, once and for all, that I'm more than just a pretty face.”

 

 

West
Q3
J543
J94
Q864
North
A97
AKQ
8765
K32
East
J1085
2
Q1032
A975
South
K642
109876
AK
J10
W
N
E
S
1
P
2
P
2
P
4
P
P
P
D
4 South
NS: 0 EW: 0

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