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B-A-M BAM
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In the Mixed BAM, I picked up the following hand:

South
A1043
96
J982
432
W
N
E
S
P
P
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
?

My partner and I were playing 2-way New Minor Forcing as an unpassed hand, but not by a passed hand. I had a mental lapse and bid 2, intending it as a relay to 2 with the obvious plan to pass. When my partner bid 2 I realized what had happened. Is there a way out? It seems as though we are in bad shape no matter what I do. Since my partner has shown 12-14 HCP and both opponents are passed hands, it looks like partner has 14 and the opponents 10 and 11. If I bid 3, partner will assume I have an invitational hand and likely bid 3NT. I wanted the auction to end as fast as possible. It did not feel right passing partner to play a 4-2 heart fit with my hand exposed. I bid 2, hoping somehow to find a way out. That surprisingly ended the auction.

North
2
AQJ8
Q6543
AQJ
South
A1043
96
J982
432
W
N
E
S
P
P
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
2
P
P
P

They lead the 5 and dummy came down with some surprises. Partner had an uncomfortable hand that she felt was right on the bubble for a reverse.

I've come across many players who have been taught that reverses show 17+ HCP. By definition, since a reverse forces your partner to the three-level when they wish to take a preference back to your first suit, they promise a strong enough hand to bid at the three-level. I think of reverses as a good 16+ HCP. Sometimes I will even reverse with fewer than 16 HCP if I have a hand with great playing strength. This hand definitely qualifies for a reverse in my eyes.  

Rather than be critical of my partner's evaluation of the hand at the table, after the game I gave my partner advice about what to do when you feel your hand isn't strong enough for a reverse.  This applies to many other situations as well.

When you can't find a bid that accurately describes your hand, you should only "lie" about strength OR distribution, not both.  

You could open a 15-17 1NT, which accurately describes your strength, but lies about the small singleton spade.  

You could open 1 and then over a 1 response rebid 2.  This slightly misdescribes your shape since you are showing 5 and 4, but accurately represents your strength, showing 12-18 HCP.  

Anyhow, here I am in this absurd contract.  Diamonds looks to be making a lot of tricks, so it seems like my only shot to salvage the board is to try to score as many tricks as I can and hope the other table gets too high.  I start by taking a winning club finesse, with East playing her lowest club.  I then lead a diamond towards my hand and East starts thinking. Eventually she flies ace, dropping her partner's king.  Not a bad start.  

East plays back the 7, West ruffs and begins to think.

North
2
AQJ8
Q65
AQ
South
A1043
96
J9
43
W
N
E
S
P
P
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
2
P
P
P

Given East's low suit-preference signal and the fact that West hasn't instantly played a heart back, I am confident the heart king is onside.  West eventually plays back the 9 and I called for dummy's singleton.  Now it was East who started thinking.  It was at this moment I saw some light at the end of the tunnel.  If East decides to duck her spade honor(s) (remember, it looks like I have spades for the bidding) then I am in business.  Sure enough, that's what happened, East played the 5 and I won with the 10.
 
It was time to draw trumps!  So I played ace of spades and a spade out, with West's jack overtaken by East's queen.

North
AQ
Q65
AQ
South
3
96
J9
43
W
N
E
S
P
P
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
2
P
P
P

At this point East was just entitled to her high trump. I didn't even need the winning heart finesse with my heart going on dummy's diamond. When the dust settled I had lost just 3 trump tricks and the ace of diamonds for +140!  It turned out that our teammates defended a normal diamond contract for -130... now thats a BAM comparison.

I immediately apologized for what I felt was a fix to our opponents as I had sympathy for all of their plays. My forget had incredibly won us the board.

This was another example of how keeping your poker face and thanking partner for their dummy is imperative even in the worst of situations. There's no benefit to letting the opponents know your predicament until after the hand, unless it's required by law (for example, if I had misdescribed our actual agreement during the auction).

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