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Bermuda Bowl Finals, Day 3
(Page of 5)

With 32 boards to play in the 2015 Bermuda Bowl final,POLAND ledSWEDEN by 47.5 IMPs, 237.5-190.

SWEDEN started with small swings on the first three deals, then landed a body blow on Board 4 (click NEXT to follow the play):

West
J108
KQ6543
Q1096
North
A32
AJ92
54
KQJ5
East
964
107
A32
87432
South
KQ75
8
KJ87
A1096
W
N
E
S
2
X
2
X
P
P
P
D
2X East
NS: 0 EW: 0
8
3
J
7
1
1
0
Q
4
6
8
1
2
0
J
2
9
10
1
3
0
5
7
10
J
3
4
0
K
4
2
4
0
4
1
Q
4
3
K
3
5
1
5
5
3
6
0
5
2
10
5
2
J
3
6
2
A
6
K
3
0
6
3
K
A
10
7
1
7
3
2
8
8
Q
0
7
4
6
9
A
7
1
8
4
A
9
Q
9
1
9
4
E/W -1100
13

Both tables opened a multi 2. The Polish North overcalled 2NT and played in 3NT, making four. Upmark doubled, then passed his partner's double of the pass-or-correct 2 response. Nystromled his trump: low, jack, low. Upmark shifted to clubs. Declarer discarded three times, then ruffed the spade switch and ran the Q to South's king. South tapped dummy again, and declarer ran the 10 to South's jack. Normal enough play, but now South tapped dummy a third time, holding declarer to four trump tricks in dummy. That was -1100 and 10 IMPs toSWEDEN.

The doubling action continued on Board 5, whereSWEDEN played 4 making five at one table and doubled 5 at the other. 5 could have been beaten if the opening leader had led his partner's AKQ suit, getting a trump promotion after cashing two rounds, but he led his own AKQ suit. Declarer ruffed and claimed: 5 IMPs toPOLAND.

After a push in a worthwhile slam (better whenSWEDENbid it because declarer's K sat behind a lead-directing double),SWEDEN continued its run. Board 7:

West
AQ
AJ95
Q965
A109
North
KJ752
A7
K87643
East
8643
KQ643
K83
2
South
109
10872
J1042
QJ5
W
N
E
S
 
P
1N
2
X
XX
P
2
X
P
P
3
P
P
X
P
P
P
D
3X North
NS: 0 EW: 0

At the other table, West arrived in 4 on a transfer auction and made five (leading a diamond to dummy's king then ducking on the way back).Upmark, North, overcalled West's 1NT overcall with 2, showing a weak or very strong hand with a major: double, redouble. North showed his spades, then ran to 3 when West's double was passed around to him. The hearts were lost, and when 3 was passed around to West, he thought for a long time before doubling. Declarer lost two spades, one diamond, and one club: +670, and 16 IMPs to SWEDEN, which was up 33-5 on the segment.

Board 8:

West
5
Q7643
7654
842
North
KQ108764
109
K
J96
East
2
A2
AJ109832
AQ3
South
AJ93
KJ85
Q
K1075
W
N
E
S
P
3
4
4
5
P
P
P
D
5 East
NS: 0 EW: 0

In the Closed Room, the Swedish East declared 5 doubled on the Q lead. He won and played A and a heart. That was +550, losing one trick in each major.

In the Open Room (see diagram), Nystrom, South, declined to double, so the BBO audience expectedSWEDEN to win 4 IMPs. But Nystrom did even better. Heunderled his A. Upmark won and shifted to a club, setting up the defense's third winner before the K was dislodged. Excellent lead: 12 IMPs toSWEDEN.

The deficit was down to 7.5, andSWEDEN went ahead on Board 9 for bidding a vulnerable game missed at the other table.SWEDEN won 5 IMPs over the next three boards, and the next big swing came on Board 13:

West
KQ1095
AK5
7
J742
North
J42
943
AJ4
AK65
East
A876
J10872
1093
10
South
3
Q6
KQ8652
Q983
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
1
X
3
4
4
P
4
P
P
P
D
4 West
NS: 0 EW: 0

In the Closed Room (see diagram), the Swedes arrived in 4. Declarer lost the obvious two tricks for making five: +650. In the Open Room:

W
N
E
S
1
P
2
2
3
3
P
P
4
P
P
P

Gawrys-Klukowskisold out to 4, soSWEDEN was already slated to pick up on the board, but how large would the swing be? Klukowski, West, led the A and switched to the K and a spade, ruffed by declarer. Declarer played A, Q, getting the news, then A, spade ruff, diamonds. Klukowski ruffed the third round of the suit (declarer's last), and that was down two, but still 10 IMPstoSWEDEN.

POLAND picked up an IMP, butSWEDEN took the session 70-6 to lead by 17.5 with 16 boards remaining.

The final segment began with an interesting board (click NEXT to follow the play):

West
K874
A876
AQ85
8
North
53
J
107
AKQ97542
East
AQ2
Q1043
J964
J10
South
J1096
K952
K32
63
W
N
E
S
3NT
P
4
X
P
4
P
P
P
D
4 East
NS: 0 EW: 0
3
8
Q
10
1
1
0
3
A
6
4
2
1
1
Q
2
6
J
2
1
2
4
3
Q
7
0
1
3
A
10
6
2
0
1
4
5
4
J
K
3
2
4
6
7
5
J
0
2
5
7

In the Open Room, the Swedish North-South played 4 and lost five tricks in the side suits. In the Closed Room, Upmark, East, declared 4 on the 3 lead (low from doubletons). North won the Q and shifted to the 3. Upmark won the A and did well to advance the Q, pinning North's jack. After a diamond to the queen, declarer cashed the A and played a third diamond to South's king. South forced dummy with another club, and declarer was at the decision point.

Declarer played a spade to the queen and a heart. South split his K9, and declarer could not avoid losing two more tricks: driving out the K would leave him with a spade loser, and ruffing a spade in dummy would allow South to score two trump tricks. The winning line is to play three rounds of spades, ruffing low in dummy, and play the last diamond. South must ruff and lead away from his K9. However, this line fails against North's 3=1=2=7 distribution: If declarer ruffs the fourth round of spades low or discards, South scores the 5 and must make anohter trump trick. If declarer ruffs with the 10, South discards and must score two more trump tricks (overruffing would be fatal: a trump switch lets declarer draw trumps, and a club gives declarer a ruff-sluff followed by a trump coup).

North had done well to conceal the 2, because South's 3 opening lead was consistent with 632. However, the clue may have been in North's spade shift. I don't know what Gawrys-Klukowski shift to mid-hand, but if they shift 2nd and 4th, then the 3 (unless a falsecard, which is possible) would have to be from a two- or four-card holding—clearly a doubleton here.

Upmark played for North to be 3=1=2=7, so it was 4 IMPs to POLAND instead of 8 IMPs toSWEDEN.

After a flat game,POLANDpicked up 11 IMPs for making 3NT while the other table rested in 1NT, thenSWEDEN grabbed 6 IMPs for making 2NT while the other table failed at 2. After 3 IMPs to POLANDfor an extra vulnerable undertrick, the lead changed hands here:

West
J83
86432
A8
864
North
7
J
Q10763
AKQJ53
East
AQ1065
Q109
KJ94
9
South
K942
AK75
52
1072
W
N
E
S
P
2
X
XX
2
3
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT South
NS: 0 EW: 0

Gawrys-Klukowski arrived in the unbeatable 3NT (see diagram), while Sylvan-Wrang lost three top tricks in 5: 10 IMPs toPOLAND, up 28-6 on the segment and ahead 271.5-266 with eight boards to play.

POLAND's lead got wider with a nonvulnerable game-swing, butSWEDEN struck back here:

West
AJ1093
A64
AQ7
K3
North
Q872
Q10
KJ986
98
East
K65
K932
43
10754
South
4
J875
1052
AQJ62
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
P
1
P
2
P
2NT
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT West
NS: 0 EW: 0

Nystrom-Upmark did very well to get to 3NT, as the cards lay. North led a diamond to the queen, and declarer made the normal misguess in spades, playing K and a spade to the jack. North won and played the K, ducked, then switched to a club. South won the A and reverted to diamonds. Declarer had nine tricks and a 10th materialized with a heart-club squeeze on South.

In the other room, Kalita-Nowosadzki arrived in the normal 4. Sylvan led the 9, ducked to Kalita's king. Declareraccurately finessed North for the Q, crossed in hearts, drew trumps, and ducked a heart, but with hearts 4-2, the diamond finesse off, and no squeeze developing declarer was doomed to go down one. Still, it took careful defense to take four tricks. After winning the Q, Sylvan went back to clubs (a diamond gives away the 10th trick immediately). Wrang won and played another club, ruffed by declarer. Now Kalita crossed to the K, getting the bad news, and played a diamond. If Wrang had lazily followed with the 2, Kalita would have inserted the seven, endplaying North. But Wrang was right there with the 10:-100 and 12 IMPs toSWEDEN, back on top by half an IMP.

SWEDEN added another 5 IMPs for stopping in a partial while the Poles failed in game. With five boards to play:SWEDEN 283 -POLAND 277.5.

The lead changed hands again on Board 28:

West
J2
KQ106
A74
J987
North
A
A95
KQ985
AK62
East
KQ108543
J843
102
South
976
72
J63
Q10543
W
N
E
S
1
X
3
P
3
X
P
P
P
D
3X West
NS: 0 EW: 0

In the Closed Room, the East jumped to 4 at his first opportunity, which got doubled by North. The siding was critical: There, South led his doubleton heart, and the ruff defeated 4 doubled. In the Open Room (see diagram), whereWest became declarer at 3 doubled, the lead made no difference. The actual club lead led to making four: +630 and 12 IMPs toPOLAND. But even if the defense had held declarer to his contract, +530 would have still been 12 IMPs.

The lead was only 6.5 IMPs, but the next two boards effectively dealt a deathblow toSWEDEN: the Swedish pairs missed two games bid by the Poles (one could have been defeated on an unlikely lead), swinging 13 and 6 IMPs, respectively. That pushed the lead to 25.5 with two boards to play. There were no miracles forSWEDEN hidden in the last two deals.

Condolences toSWEDEN for losing such a close and hard-fought match. Congratulations toPOLAND, a bridge powerhouse achieving its first Bermuda Bowl title. Congratulations especially to Michal Klukowski, who, in addition to being a repeat world champion (with the Rosenblum in 2014), is the youngest player, at 19, to win the Bermuda Bowl.

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