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Down Under Coup

West
4
109
A10765
J7643
North
East
AK1052
AKJ86
J
A9
South
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
3
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT West
NS: 0 EW: 0
2
J
Q
A
0
0
1
10
3
6
Q
3
1
1
8
10
K
2
1
2
1
7
A
2
9
2
2
2
K
4
5
4
2
2
3
J
5
3
8
2
2
4
8
3
6
10
2
2
5
A
2
4
K
2
2
6
8

This hand came from the Australian Trials.  The defense might not have been optimal, but that is not relevant to this article.  Click through the play to arrive at the 5-card ending, and think about how you would play from there.

This was the whole hand:

West
4
109
A10765
J7643
North
J983
73
K942
K108
East
AK1052
AKJ86
J
A9
South
Q76
Q542
Q83
Q52
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
P
1
P
1
P
1NT
P
3
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT West
NS: 0 EW: 0
2
J
Q
A
0
0
1
10
3
6
Q
3
1
1
8
10
K
2
1
2
1
7
A
2
9
2
2
2
K
4
5
4
2
2
3
J
5
3
8
2
2
4
8
3
6
10
2
2
5
A
2
4
K
2
2
6
8

At this point, declarer played another club.  South won, and found the only play to defeat the contract - the spade queen.  If declarer won, dummy would be endplayed; if declarer ducked, South could exit with a club and North would win the last trick with the 9.  Cashing AK first would fare no better - South could jettison the Q.

But there is a way.  Cash ONE high spade, THEN play a club.  South wins and plays Q, but declarer pitches his diamond, and ducks.  Now South must concede the last two tricks.  This play (A then a club) seems to be logical as a single-dummy play.

I wondered if the A play deserved a name.  It has some similarities to the Dentist Coup.  So I thought I'd make it the Dentist Coup's richer cousin, and call it - brace yourself - the Orthodontist Coup.

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