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Harold Guiver stories please

The name Harold Guiver brings a smile to people's faces. I have heard some good stories about him. At the end of this article there are links containing biographical information, and his connection with Billie Jean King.

It would be great to have a catalogue of his bridge (and non-bridge) adventures. To start the ball rolling I have included a hand & story that is familiar to some of you. In 1999 I wrote an article about the deal from 1975, and as part of that article I asked Matt Granovetter to reflect on that episode from 24 years ago.

-- the 1999 article--

Tournament Bridge, An Uncensored Memoir by Jerome S. Machlin is a delightful selection of amusing stories from a past chief tournament director of the ACBL

I found this story quite amusing, and wondered if there was more to it:

[BEGIN MACHLIN QUOTE]    There are many stories about players getting into contracts with singletons or voids in the trump suit, but it is rare when this happens in knockout competition among topnotch players. One of these rare occasions was the following:

 

West
Axxxxx
Jx
Jx
10xx
North
KQJ
Qxx
Qxx
Kxxx
East
xxx
xxx
x
AQJ986
South
x
AKxxx
AKxxxxx
W
N
E
S
 
1
P
2N
P
3
P
3
P
4
P
4
P
5
P
P
P
D
5 South
NS: 0 EW: 0

North: Jimmy Cayne; East: Harold Guiver; South Matt Granovetter

Guiver, hobbling around on a cane, couldn't believe his ears. In the pass-out position, he painfully climbed up on his chair and shouted, "PASS!"

This was the world's first stand-up penalty pass. 

[END MACHLIN QUOTE]

I needed to know more. So I contacted Matt Granovetter by email and asked him a few questions. Here is what he had to say:

SM: Could you talk me through the bidding?

MG: My mistake was not rebidding 4 over 2NT. Then if I heard a cue bid of 4, I could bid 7. The actual 3 by North was meant as strength in spades, not an ace cue bid. My double cuebid in clubs was a big mistake. I forgot the rule that one should never double cuebid a void in the same suit; partner may not be in on the secret.

SM: What was said afterwards (between you and JC)?

MG: Nothing. He was dummy, so it was less painful on his side. We settled quickly and went on to the next hand. Cayne is a very experienced rubber bridge player.

SM: Did you win the match? What was the event? Which year?

MG: It was the Spingold, round of 8, Miami Beach, Summer, 1975. We lost the match, losing 60 imps in the last quarter, after being up 50! This hand was one of the reasons. Our teammate, George Rapee, who just passed away on April 1 this year, was in his room resting for the next day's match.

SM: What happened in the other room?

MG: 6 making 6, where we should have been.

SM: Did Harold get into trouble for standing up and shouting Pass?

MG: No, these were the days when you were free to do and say what you liked.

SM: What did the kibitzers say/do?

MG: My kibitzer and I laughed. We were too shocked to cry. I wasn't laughing at the dummy, I was laughing at my own stupidity.

SM: Looking back on the story, can you tell me how you feel about it?

MG: When Jimmy passed, it felt like I had just been hit by a sledge-hammer. Nowadays it resurfaces in nightmares. After this hand, Harold Guiver and I became dear friends, but he's careful not to bring up the hand too much. I've never discussed the hand with Cayne, who quit bridge for a year afterwards. The lesson: Don't repeat a cuebid; then you don't have to dream about it the rest of your life.

LINKS:

http://articles.latimes.com/2005/oct/11/local/me-guiver11

http://www.infobridge.it/Campioni_GuiverH.htm

http://www.presstelegram.com/sports/20140124/billie-jean-kings-long-beach-roots-run-deep

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