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I recently asked people to find a rebid on this hand: 

South
10732
K2
AQ10
AKQ10
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
1
?
 

Let me set the scene. It is 1970. You are in Memphis, TN at a regional, playing with a stranger who has proven to be a pretty good player. He, like you, is young. Arrayed against you are Julius Rosenblum, the President of the World Bridge Federation, and Nate Silverstein who is a regular panelist for the Bridge World MSC. Both are somewhat crusty old southern gentlemen who are not happy with cocky whippersnappers. Both at the time were among the all-time top 100 masterpoint holders. 

Anyway, I chose to double. The typical meaning of double at the time was either penalty or "I have a good hand with no particular direction," sort of "Do Something Intelligent, Partner," although we had not yet worked out that acronym. This brought a fairly long thought from partner who emerged with 2. Back to me?

South
10732
K2
AQ10
AKQ10
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
1
X
P
2
P
?
 

No spade stopper, a doubleton heart, I couldn't see anything better than 3. Partner raised. I tried 4 and after a couple more bids found myself in 6. Rosenblum led the 9 and I saw:

North
6
A10743
K764
J82
South
10732
K2
AQ10
AKQ10
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
1
X
P
2
P
3
P
4
P
4
P
4
P
4NT
P
6
P
P
P

Nate won the J and shifted to a club. How would you plan the play? In those days I sort of went with the flow. I won, ruffed a spade, crossed to a diamond and ruffed a third spade (both followed). Another diamond on which both followed. 

This left:

North
A10743
K7
South
10
K2
10
AKQ
W
N
E
S
1
P
1
1
X
P
2
P
3
P
4
P
4
P
4
P
4NT
P
6
P
P
P

I drew a trump, thankful that both followed, and pitched a heart from dummy. Now a third trump. LHO followed. What should I pitch? It was clear at this point that I could make the hand, provided I could guess the shape. 

If East is 5-4-2-2 I can make on a major suit squeeze. I can pitch another heart before deciding.

If East is 5-2-4-2 I can make on a spade-diamond squeeze. I can pitch another heart before deciding. 

If East is 5-3-3-2 I can just claim. Dummy's fourth diamond is good.

If East has three clubs, and 3-2 either way in the red suits I am cold. 

If East is 5-1-4-3 I can make, again on a - squeeze. 

What to do?

North
A1074
K7
South
10
K2
10
KQ
W
N
E
S
6
P
P
P

It seemed sort of silly to go down when diamonds were 3-3 all along - which was now somewhat more likely than not since all 4-2 breaks with Jx were ruled out. So I pitched another heart from dummy. East followed. I led a diamond, West covered with the J and I claimed. Remember I was young, and these were ostensibly great players. Big mistake. 

"Whad'ya mean, you claim." "Either diamonds break," "THEY DON'T!" "or I have a marked double squeeze." "Director!" 

A director I did not know came scurrying over. "Yes Mr. Silverstein?" "This young punk claimed." That apparently was two strikes against me. I was a young punk and I had claimed. I was asked to go over the claim. I explained the end position. I would win the K and if East showed out, a heart to the King and the last club would get me my twelfth trick. One way or another. Neither opponent was satisfied. Nor was the director: he did not want to rule against Silverstein, who was tournament chairman. Even when I showed the three of them trick by trick what would happen they did not believe it. 

"I will consult," said the director. "Meanwhile, move for the next round. You'll have to take a late play on the second board." 

After the game Tommy Sanders came over. Tommy was about ten years younger than the two GOM, fifteen or so years older than I was. "Look, Henry," he said, "don't ever claim against someone you don't know. It usually just wastes time and causes hard feelings. Especially, don't claim on a squeeze." "But they both have a zillion masterpoints!" I complained. "So? just don't claim."

Good lesson that was. 

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