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One from the Seamon Junior USBC
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One of the downsides of living up north is that travel during the winter can be dicey. I was visiting my parents over Christmas in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and I was going to fly to Atlanta on the 26th to start play in the Michael Seamon Junior USBC on the 27th.

The temperature was well below 0 that morning—the thermometer in the car got as low as 20 below on the ride to the airport—and the wind chill hovered around -30. The bad weather, plus some mechanical troubles, meant that I didn't get out on the 26th. Fortunately, I was on a six-handed team (Adam KAPLAN, Christian Jolly; Zach Grossack, Oren Kriegel; Ben Kristensen, Kevin Rosenberg), so my presence wasn't completely necessary.

I went back to the airport on the 27th, when it was much warmer (up to around -10), and I was able to make it to Chicago (a balmy 0 degrees), where I connected to Atlanta.

I made it in time to play the second half of the round robin. My teammates had done well in the morning, putting up three big wins. We scored a near-blitz in the fourth match, and despite losing the fifth, we had more or less locked up first place in the round-robin. The last match of the day was mostly for practice, and luckily, an opportunity arose. 

On the second board of the match, I picked up a decent hand as South:

North
Q109
K83
10632
A93
South
A8432
4
AQ84
K84
W
N
E
S
P
1
2
3
4
4
P
P
P

East passed, I opened 1, and West overcalled 2. Partner, Zach Grossack, bid 3, upgrading his K and Q109. Even with those nice features, 3 seems awfully pushy to me, but hey, it's junior bridge—bid 'em up. East bid 4, and I bid 4, ending the auction.

West led the A, then guessed to shift to the 7. That didn't hurt my feelings at all, especially when it rode to my 8.

How would you play?

North
Q109
K8
1063
A93
South
A8432
AQ4
K84
W
N
E
S
P
1
2
3
4
4
P
P
P

It looked like West had started with KJ97, along with five or six hearts. That didn't leave a lot of room for spades, and given that West had shown up with the A and, presumably, the KJ, I decided to play East for the K. I led a spade: low, 10, king.

East shifted to a club, which I won in hand with the K. I played another trump and won West's J with dummy's Q.

West appears to be 2=5=4=2 or, less likely, 2=6=4=1. How do you plan to avoid losing two more diamonds?

North
9
K8
1063
A9
South
A84
AQ4
84
W
N
E
S
P
1
2
3
4
4
P
P
P

I cashed the 9, as West discarded a heart, then ruffed dummy's 8 without cashing the K. (Overtaking the 9 is equivalent.)

Next, I cashed the A. If West indeed had begun with no more than two clubs, he was going to be squeezed. After taking the A, I would play a club to the A, leaving this four-card ending:

North
K
1063
South
AQ4
8

If West has kept all his diamonds, I would cash the K and throw West in with a diamond. If West discarded a diamond at any point, I could just set up a diamond trick, while dummy retained the K.

In practice, West discarded a diamond on the last spade, so I was able to drive out the K and claim, without having to cross to dummy's A. That was a cool +620 and 13 IMPs, when my teammates beat 4 two tricks at the other table.

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