Join Bridge Winners
Two from the Senior Teams Final in Wroclaw
(Page of 6)

Here are two deals from the Senior Teams Final of this year's World Bridge Games.

West
North
1064
Q32
K1082
AQ6
East
South
KQ5
6
J94
K109852
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
2
3
4
P
P
P
D
4 South
NS: 0 EW: 0
7
2
J
6
2
0
1
7
K
3
4
3
1
1
5
3
Q
4
1
2
1
6
A
5
8
2
2
2
9
Q
J
10
3
3
2
8
J
A
7
1
4
2
Q
A
9
4
3
5
2
7

West leads the 7 (agreed as third or fifth best from honor(s) or second highest from four spots), ducked in Dummy and won by East's J. East shifts to the 7, taken by your K (3 from West, agreed as standard count). You cross to the Q (both defenders' following) to lead another . East rises (8 from West) and exits with the 9 to your Q (J from West). You cross to the A (both following, West with the J) to lead the Q, covered by the A and ruffed in the closed hand (4 from West).

How do you tackle s?

(Diagram repeated for convenience.)

West
North
1064
Q32
K1082
AQ6
East
South
KQ5
6
J94
K109852
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
2
3
4
P
P
P
D
4 South
NS: 0 EW: 0
7
2
J
6
2
0
1
7
K
3
4
3
1
1
5
3
Q
4
1
2
1
6
A
5
8
2
2
2
9
Q
J
10
3
3
2
8
J
A
7
1
4
2
Q
A
9
4
3
5
2
7

East appears to have started with A972 AKJ10x ?? 74. If East held the A, that would give West very little offense for the 3 call and would give East a lot for having subsided over 4. But if West held both the A and Q, that would have made for a heavy preemptive raise. This suggests that the A is likely with West, and the Q likely with East. If East has Qx, you can lead toward the K and assuming that West ducks (rising wouldn't help), win, ruff Dummy's remaining , and lead a second . If West ducks to avoid crashing honors, then East would be endplayed.

Accordingly, South at Trick 8 led the J to the K (5 from West, 3 from East), ruffed Dummy's remaining (5 from West, 8 from East), and led the 4.

Unfortunately for Declarer, this was the full deal (Session 4, Board 20, Open Room).

Guillaumin
J83
9754
AQ75
J3
Meckstroth
1064
Q32
K1082
AQ6
Palau
A972
AKJ108
63
74
Zia
KQ5
6
J94
K109852
W
N
E
S
P
P
1
2
3
4
P
P
P
D
4 South
NS: 0 EW: 0
7
2
J
6
2
0
1
7
K
3
4
3
1
1
5
3
Q
4
1
2
1
6
A
5
8
2
2
2
9
Q
J
10
3
3
2
8
J
A
7
1
4
2
Q
A
9
4
3
5
2
J
5
K
3
1
6
2
3
8
10
5
3
7
2
4
Q
2
6
0
7
3
A
8
2
9
0
7
4
11

At the other table, East was in 3, down one, a net of 5 IMPs to France.

Acknowledgement. Zia shared with me his thoughts on the play and cautioned about trying this at home.

West
AK86
10864
QJ3
93
North
East
J5
KQ
K985
AJ1052
South
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT East
NS: 0 EW: 0
3
4
9
Q
2
0
1
5
4
Q
2
0
0
2
9
4
5
7
0
0
3
3

South leads the 3 (agreed as fourth best) to the 4, 9, and Q. You lead the 5 to the Q, which holds (4 from South, 2 from North; agreed as count). You try the 9, which also holds (4 from North, 5 from your hand, 7 from South).

How do you continue?

(Diagram repeated for convenience.)

West
AK86
10864
QJ3
93
North
East
J5
KQ
K985
AJ1052
South
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT East
NS: 0 EW: 0
3
4
9
Q
2
0
1
5
4
Q
2
0
0
2
9
4
5
7
0
0
3
3

North apparently holds the KQ. South probably was dealt AJxxx and the A (being that the Q held at Trick 2). The play in the minors and South's failure to intervene over 1N suggest a balanced hand and that the Q is more likely with North.

Suppose that these inferences are correct and you immediately attack s. South ducks, wins the next one (the suit's breaking 3-3), and shifts to a low , which you duck to North's Q. North returns a to your K and South's A, and South plays another , which you win in the closed hand. You can now cash the 13th but have AJ102 left. Cashing the A would set up two tricks in the North hand. But leading otherwise would let North win and exit with a to Dummy, and the setting trick would be taken by South's J.

In this sequence, it wouldn't help for Dummy to rise on the first or second round of s.

Is there a better approach at Trick 4?

The actual declarer, Hemant Lall, exited with a to the K and South's A, which was the only way to ensure the contract. This was the full deal (Session 4, Board 30, Closed Room).

West
AK86
10864
QJ3
93
North
Q1097
95
1072
KQ64
East
J5
KQ
K985
AJ1052
South
432
AJ732
A64
87
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT East
NS: 0 EW: 0
3
4
9
Q
2
0
1
5
4
Q
2
0
0
2
9
4
5
7
0
0
3
6
5
K
A
3
1
3
4
6
Q
5
1
2
3
K
A
8
3
2
2
4
J
2
8
7
2
2
5
8
A
3
7
3
3
5
J
8
6
2
3
4
5
6
J
10
9
0
4
6
10

After taking the A, South could set up the s, but this would have established Declarer's ninth trick. South instead shifted to the 4, ducked to North's Q. North then tried the K, but Declarer won, unblocked the J, and attacked s. South took the A, cashed the J, and exited with a , but Declarer played the 9 under Dummy's J and took the rest.

Finally, if South (upon taking the A) had shifted to a , Declarer could win and fire back a honor, as North would have no safe return. If after taking this or the next trick, North shifted to the 10, it would go K, A, J, manufacturing an entry to the closed hand.

Was North's ducking the 9 at Trick 3 the percentage play?

 

(Diagram repeated for convenience.)

West
AK86
10864
QJ3
93
North
Q1097
95
1072
KQ64
East
J5
KQ
K985
AJ1052
South
432
AJ732
A64
87
W
N
E
S
1NT
P
2
P
2
P
3NT
P
P
P
D
3NT East
NS: 0 EW: 0
3
4
9
Q
2
0
1
5
4
Q
2
0
0
2
9
4
5
7
0
0
3
6
5
K
A
3
1
3
4
6
Q
5
1
2
3
K
A
8
3
2
2
4
J
2
8
7
2
2
5
8
A
3
7
3
3
5
J
8
6
2
3
4
5
6
J
10
9
0
4
6
10

Given East's 1N opener, ducking seems reasonable, as it caters to Partner's being nominally weaker but holding the 10 (which Declarer presumably would have finessed against if he didn't have it), as in xxx KJxxx Axx 10x.

At the other table, East was in 1N, making two, a net of 7 IMPs to the US.

Acknowledgements. Eugene Hung provided timely guidance on deploying the hand viewer. Bridge Solver Online (www.bridgesolver.co.uk) was used to check my work.

Disclosure. I have no financial or other stake in Bridge Solver Online.

13 Comments
Getting Comments... loading...
.

Bottom Home Top