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VENN AND THE ART OF ROBOCYCLING
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Maybe I've spent way too much time thinking about this upcoming competition. I've been reading all of the recent postings re. the upcoming robot individual and have been posting about strategy, fairness, and whether it's 'bridge'.

Never having played with bot before 10 days ago I've had quite an education. In particular, I am most curious about how this event is being marketed and what outcomes are being sought.

Many (most?) of us might recall venn diagrams from high school math. I'm wondering about how many circles we are talking about

http://www.educationworld.com/tools_templates/EW_venndiagram_4.doc

Who is the target population we are trying to reach? Where do the pools (circles) of players intersect?

BBO players who are new to robot play

BBO players who are or are not ACBL members

ACBL members who are new to BBO

ACBL members who are BBO familiar

Bridge players who are gamers who might see this competition as a challenge worth $40.

On the sidelines? we have Bridgewinner passionates & Bridgewinner casuals with varying degrees of interest & passion about this event as it pertains to live bridge.

We decry the fact that it isn't bridge. That you have the best hand at the table. That you can manipulate the bot algorithms. That your bot opps rarely lead from their length vs. NT, etc.

It's not bridge as we know live bridge. Robot individuals aren't bridge, but an interesting, (to me), trick taking game.

What, in your opinion, will make this experiment a success?

What outcome from the event do we hope for?

More online paying robot players? Crossover from online to live bridge?

New ACBL members?  How many BBO players are not ACBL members and will join the league and start playing in ACBL live tourneys.

A groundwork for an online individual played with 4 humans and not best hand (real live online bridge)?

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