Join Bridge Winners
What went on.
(Page of 3)

An earlier article discussed a strange set of awards for a bidding poll.

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/what-is-going-on-2-stxjhf96ip/

What was going on?

 

The following appeared in the Editorial of the January, 1958 British Bridge World.  Reese wrote:

For those who, like myself, did not retain a record of Guy Ramsey's Christmas competition for the Daily Telegraph, a fascinating exercise was to reconstruct the problem to which the answer was given as follows:

2NT - 5 marks

6NT - 4

7NT - 2

No bid - 1

Obviously a view.

 

So what was the hand and auction that generated such awards?

South
42
AQJ85
AK7
AQ5
W
N
E
S
P
1
1NT
?

Your call.

Schapiro
J9875
93
10862
82
Dodds
AKQ10
K642
J953
J
Reese
63
107
Q4
K1097643
Pavlides
42
AQJ85
AK7
AQ5
W
N
E
S
P
1
1NT
X
P
P
P
D
1NTX East
NS: 0 EW: 0

This deal is from the 1951 International Trials held in England.

At the other table, Truscott and D'Unienville bid and made 7.

We see, above, that Reese found a most unusual final pass.  This was the cause of quite some discussion at the time.  Reese put forward his view:

The pass of one notrump doubled has been the subject of much uninstructed comment. Some have held that it was a wild gamble, successful only because the opponents happened to have an easy slam. If the matter is examined more carefully it will be seen that the pass can hardly lose at the score. That the opponents have a vulnerable game is obvious from the way the bidding has gone. If one notrump is not more than three down, there is a useful gain; if it is four down, the loss is very small - probably 700 [pre-1987 scoring] as against 650 or 660. The loss exceeds one match point [EP, a forerunner of modern IMPs] only if it goes five down and the opponents cannot make a slam...

In short, a non-vulnerable player whose partner has passed should never be nervous (at international match-point scoring) of playing in a doubled contract at the range of one against vulnerable opponents.

 

Of course, one would expect this wondrous revelation to have inspired a flood of favorable-vulnerability overcalls on 4333 Yarboroughs.  After all, if one is not going to run, one need not have an escape suit.  But no, this profitable winning way never caught on. 

Strange.

As an aside, I have a suspicion... It's clear that Reese, in 1957, did not associate Ramsey's awards with the 1951 deal.  I suspect that if he had, he would not have been quite so quick with the one-liner.

As we see, Reese was fortunate to find that his psyche took place on a deal where the opponents were cold for a grand slam.  I have quite a few other instances of big-name pairs psyching at such fortunate times.  Stay tuned!

11 Comments
Getting Comments... loading...
.

Bottom Home Top