Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Ai-Tai Lo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 27 28 29 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You are right, Ed. Not at any time.
Jan. 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Now you will be at least suspended for such behavior. I would be ashamed if I behaved like such a bully. And you actually post this in public and seem to think your behavior is OK? What law states you must play a card that your partner hasn't seen yet? Who gives you the right to physically interact with your opponent? Your opponent must have been an inexperienced player intimidated by your action. If I were in charge of ACBL, I would kick you out of the league right now. There is no place for your behavior when we are trying so hard to attract young players to the game.
Jan. 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I can kind of see your point: You thought it is possible that North meant his 2 bid as a limit raise based on his hand evaluation. After his partner competed to 3 based on him having only a 4-card mixed raise per his partner's explanation, he decided to raise to 4. You also thought maybe he didn't want to admit he took advantage of partner's explanation which is UI when asked.

In this situation, I usually look at their convention cards to see if there is an agreement. If there is a correct agreement, everything is hunky-dory. If there isn't one, then I will point it to them. Frankly, in club games, I wouldn't bother calling the director, but at the nationals, I would ask them to produce their notes if there is no written agreement on their convention cards. I will then call the director if they can't produce any documents showing their agreement.

I also try very hard to fill out my convention card as detailed as possible. When the opponent asks for an explanation of my partner's bid, I can just point out our agreement on the card without any verbal explanation to avoid potential UI. It is hard to do it consistently, but I try. If we are not in a rush, I think we should practice writing down our explanation if it is very short. How hard can it be to write down “LR” or “4+ mixed”?
Jan. 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Congrats! Lew is always a gentleman at the table; I don't recall him ever saying anything negative to his partner and always compliments his opponents for their good bid/play. He also has a dry sense of humor; once in a while he would make a funny remark that just eases the tensions at the table. Playing against him is always a friendly competition. I recall the first time playing against him when I was a novice/intermediate player in a Vanderbilt match back in the mid-80's. We were obviously out of our depth against his team but he was very friendly and tried to make us feel comfortable. Back in those days, quite a few top players would try to intimidate inexperienced players so I really appreciate his attitude toward us.
Jan. 18
Ai-Tai Lo edited this comment Jan. 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I find it a bit odd that they played 24 boards in the first session but 36 boards in the second session today. Yesterday, they played 24 boards in both sessions.
Jan. 13
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You are not one of the 10 best pairs in England? I assume you played with Bell. These 10 pairs must be excellent. I played against a few who are regular attendees of our NABC's especially Bakhshi and Townsend.

On a separate note, do you (and other English players) think selecting pairs instead of teams is better and more accurate? In the States, we always have team trials. I know this is mostly because most of our teams have sponsors so selecting pairs wouldn't be possible.
Jan. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
How come David Gold is not in the trials?
Jan. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The Wei team are in much better spirit today. They have decided to try again for 2019. Like Karen said, you have to learn to lose before you can win. And the taste of winning will be much sweeter after losing first. All the juniors will be back to practice in three weeks. Hopefully, I can contribute a little to their winning.
Jan. 1
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I really feel terrible for the declarer. They were in a grand (no interference from the opponents) that either requires a K onside or a squeeze that requires the person with the offside K also guarding a side suit. The finesse is obviously the percentage play (straight 50%), but he played for the drop and failed. I think they bid the grand because they thought they were behind due to three large swings against them at the beginning of the quarter. Not sure if the anti-percentage play was also due to the state of the match. The lesson learned here is never assume you know the state of the match because you have no idea what happens at the other table as your teammates might have a great set.

I mentor the Wei team so I know the players. He is a very nice, polite and bright kid who is a PhD. student in Economics at Harvard. He must feel he let his teammates down (how can he not?). But bridge is a team game, not one single person can win or lose a match by himself/herself. It just happened his mistake was on the last board so it was magnified. Any of the three large negative swings at the beginning of the quarter could have won the match for them. I hope he is eligible to play again next year. It hurts to end your junior playing days like this.
Dec. 31, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Good luck to all participants especially the ones I mentor (Team Wei in U26). David is right; these guys are absolutely bright, all the guys on my team are PhD./Masters students at top universities.

How well they play really surprised me when I first started mentoring them back in August. They are way better than I was when I was their age. I didn't start playing until I was a sophomore in college, while they started in grade school/middle school. Starting early is obviously the key.

We need to encourage kids in grade school to pick up a trick-taking game (doesn't have to be bridge, I first started playing hearts before bridge). It's much easier to play bridge if you know how to take tricks. You can learn bidding later on.
Dec. 27, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
If you lead a spot card instantly, it's usually a singleton. But I don't see any issue making a natural lead like from KQJx or QJ10x. I think consistently making a pause like 2-3 seconds is enough. Then when you have a lead problem, it won't be so obvious. It should be the same when you are defending in the middle of a hand.
Dec. 20, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think it depends on the auction. For example, 1 by LHO, 3 by RHO (4-card LR), 4 by LHO in tempo. Now I think it's OK to hold the tray longer if you are thinking about doubling 4. In this auction, your partner and RHO won't know who's thinking; LHO could be thinking about passing 3 or he could be thinking about making a move toward slam. Even if the auction has gone 1NT by RHO and 3NT by LHO, it is still not clear who's thinking; LHO could be thinking about inviting to 3NT via a 2 size check or he could be thinking about bidding Stayman if he has a flat hand with a 4-card major (strong enough to force to game). In some rare cases, he might even be thinking about investigating slam with a border-line hand but decides to sign off in 3NT.

The most tempo-sensitive auction is 1NT by LHO and 3NT by RHO; if you are thinking about doubling 3NT, you must make a decision in tempo because it is clear who's thinking in this auction as LHO, the 1NT opener, will not be thinking about anything other than passing.
Dec. 20, 2017
Ai-Tai Lo edited this comment Dec. 20, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Many people like to win/do well in a national event and the mixed events offer the best chances for them, it is also good for socializing among couples. That's why the attendances are always high at these events. I think we should keep these events if we are trying to increase the attendances at the nationals.
Dec. 20, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Are they better than the Americans on average? I was only explaining why I think the field is not even as good as that of a second-tier national event in relation to Greg Lawler's post in which he said he doesn't think the NAP/GNT are of the highest tier.
Dec. 19, 2017
Ai-Tai Lo edited this comment Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
They are not because only US citizens and residents can enter; foreign players cannot play in NAP/GNT which is fine because they are grass-root events. Plus most sponsors and top pros don't play in the GNT because it does not award seeding points for the USBF team trials (it did once upon a time). Due to these factors, the quality of the field is not even as good as that of a second-tier national event.
Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
That's because he assumed people would behave like he does; win at all cost especially when this is his source of income.
Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This was what happened a long time ago at the nationals. RHO was a obnoxious second-tier pro from California whom I never like. He opened 4 first seat and put a stop card on the table. I had a weak balanced hand (can't remember exactly how many HCP). Since he put a stop card on the table, I tried to be ethical so I waited approximately 10 seconds before passing (I would have waited even if he hadn't). My partner at the balance seat had a normal 4 bid so he did. RHO immediately called the director and claimed my partner bid on my hesitation. I told the director I followed the rule and waited 10 seconds before passing. I will never forget what RHO said afterwards; he said most people will wait less than 5 seconds if they have nothing to bid so I must have something. Director asked us to play and called him back if there was a problem. When the dummy came down, RHO became quiet all of a sudden. 4 went down because my hand was too weak. 4 couldn't make either. Otherwise, I am sure RHO would call the director again. From that day on, I realized the stop card is worthless and never used it again.
Dec. 19, 2017
Ai-Tai Lo edited this comment Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Technically speaking, the LM Pairs and the Blue Ribbon Pairs are not ‘open’ either; one must be an ACBL Life Master to play in the LM Pairs and has earned qualifications to play in the Blue Ribbon Pairs. Admittedly, it is much easier to be eligible to play in these two events than the Platinum Pairs.
Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In your tier-two events, Open BAM, Jacoby Swiss and Nail LM are MUCH harder than the rest of the tier-two events because there are no other OPEN national events at the same time other than the Vanderbilt semi-finals. They should be considered between tier-one and tier-two.

Also, Mixed BAM, Swiss and Pairs don't belong to tier-two because they have specific gender composition of the pair/team.

I also consider Baze Senior KO's stronger than most of the tier-two events other than the three events I mentioned above. If Meckwell, Bobby Levin and other top players are playing in it, it is a strong field.
Dec. 19, 2017
Ai-Tai Lo edited this comment Dec. 19, 2017
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Can anyone tell me if they have actually finished 10 minutes late in a pair event at the nationals due to following a slow pair? I seriously doubt it. Directors would never allow that because they want to post the scores ASAP. They have dinner commitments too. At the end, everyone will catch up.
Dec. 18, 2017
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 27 28 29 30
.

Bottom Home Top