Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Alexander Woo
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Almost all full service clubs are in places that already have a nearby regional every year, if not more often.

Anyone have ideas for bridge players outside the big cities, or have you just given up on us?
May 8
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“I think this is the hand for a LOTT downgrade. They might only have a 7 card fit, flat hands often produce fewer tricks than LOTT says, and this is a situation where they might find the double for 200.”
April 23
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Sadly, anyone with both the time and the brains for bridge isn't going to the university I teach at.
April 19
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I was indeed talking about standard Jacoby, and imagined Tom's bidding sequence.

I agree there are better methods out there, though I don't know one that's both better and at least as easy to remember.
April 16
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Here is the what Jacoby 2N is supposed to address:

AKxxx KQx x Kxxx

opposite

Qxxx Axx xxx AQx

is almost cold (around 80%+) for 6.

However,

AKxxx KQx Kxxx x

opposite

Qxxx Axx xxx AQx

has basically no chance at 6 and shouldn't be in 5.

How will your scheme find slam on the first pair of hands while stopping at 4 on the second?
April 14
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Ed - you read me correctly.

In one club, the director would insist that they should be welcomed to play what they play. But it would mean we would probably go from having no game a couple times a year to no game every couple of months. They'd add half a table but cost us somewhere between half a table and one table on average. We're averaging about 3 right now. The mode is 2.5.

In the other, the director would tell them the facts - that club would probably lose more than a full table (not counting them - more than a half table counting them) if they played regularly - and leave it up to them.

Nothing personal here - they would be welcomed as people - but we have folks who would not be willing to play against them on a regular basis.
April 14
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I'm about 35 (of any color) short. I might as well get it over with instead of taking 4 years to do it. (Besides, I like playing in better games…)
April 14
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Robert - there are bracketed knockouts. Also, the side games, even though they are open games, are generally much easier than the 2 session games.
April 14
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Ed - both of the clubs have survived because we have welcomed the not particularly competitive, socially oriented players who, in most other places, would be unwilling to venture out of the kitchen or senior center games.

The alternative is to join the several dozen clubs in other rural communities in our state and surrounding states that have died in the last 20 years.

I don't know exactly who has made LM, but we don't have 3 tables of LMs within 60 miles, and I'm not sure we have 2 tables. (There are some reasonably serious players who haven't made LM, but some of the LMs aren't playing much anymore. The somewhat serious players don't add up to a game by themselves.)

Frankly, it's a bit of a minor miracle that a town of 25K, two thirds of its county in population, has a weekly sanctioned game at all.
April 14
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Where I am, this would be pointless.

For both of the clubs within 80 miles of where I live, having a pair that regularly played something not 5-card-majors-strong-NT-no-forcing-1-level-bids would mean the death of the club in short order.
April 13
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Karen - I think of your club as medium-sized.
April 12
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Jeff,

The smaller clubs that have been dying have never been for-profit in any meaningful sense. At best, they manage to pay a barely reasonable wage to the director.

Bridge clubs in rural places die when they run out of bridge players. No don't talk about classes for new bridge players, because there aren't enough people around to have enough people for classes. (Also, the rural brain drain means that everyone who can count to 13 has left.) If there's recruiting, it's going to be one person teaching one or two friends to play - and most of those friends will end up finding any form of duplicate too competitive.

Naturally, I'm interested in the problems that I see and that affect me, so I'm going to be most interested in how the ACBL can help 3 table a week clubs (which are the only club for 30 miles) stay afloat for as long as possible.
April 11
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Your accounting is off.

Let's be optimistic and say every table needs one copy, and assume copiers don't have ongoing costs. You need 1000 tables to pay off your copier.

To pay off a copier in four months, you need 55 tables a week.

In all of Seattle, there are two clubs with that kind of volume. In the rest of Washington state, zero.

I've played on the order of 350 club sessions in my life. About 20 have been at a club that could pay off a copier in a few months.
April 11
Alexander Woo edited this comment April 11
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Jeff - those were my guesses, but I actually wouldn't be surprised if there were so few genuinely for-profit clubs that you're basically talking about no one, in which case your questions about club profits are moot.
April 11
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Do we have any idea how many of those clubs are nominally for-profit, and of those, how many are really for-profit? (Some clubs are legally for-profit entities, but their owners are running them as a service to the community and aren't trying to do more than break even or avoid more a small loss.)

I would guess less than half and less than a quarter.
April 10
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Is there a list of all the participating colleges/universities?

Was a single one of them non-selective?
April 9
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What I can see working is a new Ribbon Pairs with an MP limit of 1000, with ribbon pre-qualification from Gold Rush events.

Right now, winning a Gold Rush event awards a Red Ribbon qualification, but we could tweak ribbon qualifications so that 800-2000 limit events award Red Ribbon qualifications (as many mid-flight pairs and B strats are now at 2000, not 1500), and 300-750 events award qualifications for this new event.

I'd play if I can make it, and I might even play it with local partners with whom I would hesitate to play Red Ribbon Pairs (because they'd be roadkill in that event, and I'm not good enough to compensate).
April 8
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Let's put it this way - it's better than having to drive 90 miles for a game. (And you'd better show up most weeks, or soon there won't be a game left.)
April 8
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I played in one of the last National NLM pairs events in I think 2009. (It was a Fall NABC in San Diego.) It drew either 13 or 14 tables - the right size for a 2 session 2 board per round all play all movement. I remember the event being an absolute MP crapshoot - there was a competent 2/3 of the field and an incompetent 1/3, and the event was entirely decided by whether you played the swingy boards against the incompetent 1/3. (I might be misremembering, but I think the margin of victory for the winners might have been a revoke.)

The average person who plays in 299er games isn't going to enter a “National 299er” event. Every time I've been in a low bracket knockout, there has been some opposing team that really just did not want to play my team of young-ish players who look competent. Those folks would play in the regular 299er games, but they will be scared that a National 299er event is filled with such folks and not play. If they were even moderately brave they would've entered at least the Gold Rush.
April 8
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I think it might matter how expensive this drug is.

If it is expensive (say on the order of hundreds of dollars a day), then it becomes an advantage that wealthier players have. You could imagine it becoming another reason that pros are better, because their sponsors are willing to pay for these drugs.
April 3
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