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All comments by Allan Graves
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I played a few events with Kenny . Great player. We were only casual friends as we ran in different circles but I always enjoyed his company. This is sad .
11 hours ago
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I missread the problem. LOL I would pass . No reason to take a position on this hand. The partnership bid is to Pass.
Nov. 8
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If I was a coach I would ask my pair to play a regional without any ace asking conventions except 4NT last train when obvious . That would give them more confidence to “bid a hand out “ if the decision to keycard or not was close .
Oct. 30
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Two and three suiters are best opened naturally if at all possible . Surely 1C is completely possible I can’t imagine a second choice to 1C .
Oct. 29
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Passing 1C would be dubious
Oct. 29
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I would agree. All Krystofs books are very poorly translated.
I don't know why to tell you the truth as the hands are properly edited and the material compelling
Oct. 25
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yes you are getting some benefit in your life from bridge
It is pennies a day to belong to the main tournament organization.
Oct. 25
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Singleton K OK as it has some positional advantage. If I have 12-14 I prefer to rebid 1NT with a singleton in Responders. suit if the alternative is to rebid in 5 card minor or new suit minor within 12-14 NT range. Raise M on 3 support OK. ( many will prefer not to do this but as long as Partner is aware then they can FG with 2 way and then rebid their suit ) In general your rebid should point to most likely game and best limit your hand.
However opening 1NT with a Singleton A is extremely poor in my opinion. The evaluation is very different than it is for a singleton K for game slam decisions and part scores are best bid out via one suit opener. Even 2NT I would avoid.
Oct. 21
Allan Graves edited this comment Oct. 21
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Well , when you get down to the end game there would still be the 4-4 vs 5-3 major suit probability which is compelling enough to warrant reflection. especially if the opening leader was capable of deception ( and it was on their card as a slam tendency) A player looking at only 12 HCP in dummy opposite a 19+ to 21 opening and 3 hearts in their hand ( 50% not to have the Jack ) and putting Spades KJX in declarer if the lead is top. Well they might just try for the quick kill as the spade King is possible for partner. Certainly it would not be a smooth duck unless the hearts were known to be stopped. This was my point about table feel as complementary to analysis and why I responded a second time to a new post to this hand. Table feel as declarer is part of the game and my experience of my partner was that hands like this were made . These hands are one of the myriad of reasons that make bridge such a compelling and ultimately unfathomable game. Michael Rosenberg added a very important component about illusions , deceptions and assumptions which complemented nicely the interesting and humorous fantasy post by the Swedish fellow.
Oct. 14
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Contract Bridge is the ultimate risk/reward whist family card game. Its form of betting for tricks and a risk reward scoring structure so perfectly conceived that it is basically unchanged since 1925
.Good bidders have always bet tricks governed by the risk reward principle inherent in the scoring structure Trumps are good ways to take tricks,
I think perhaps your definition of expert community must be different than mine for , to say that expert bidders did not understand betting tricks within the context of risk reward scoring is , with all due respect, ludicrous. They have understood that since 1925 .
What has evolved though is the appreciation that a lot of the perceived risk is often an illusion and therefore bids that look for fits at low level in order to compete at higher levels and/or establish a defense / opening lead were becoming increasingly more common.

Within the rank and file constructive bidding was becoming much better and that has continued today. However the gap between the middle 70 % of the field is now much greater. That is to say that now, the bottom 15 % of the ACBL do not know how to play bridge at all and the gap of skill between the next 15% and 70-85 is significantly greater . This is because in 1965 99 % of the bridge playing public did not play , nor want to play, ACBL duplicate .therefore relatively speaking , the weaker tournament players were decent players and the average age was certainly less than 40 . The weaker players were also aware of the highly competitive nature of tournament bridge I have been playing bridge for 60 years and ACBL for 55 so I can attest to that through direct experience. I was always one of the youngest tournament players and now that I am seventy that is still the case.
Even as we speak, the game of bridge is dying. The average age of the ACBL is creeping to 75 .Alas no one seems know what to do about it.
You might do well to consider the 99 % to 1% I mentioned earlier and reflect upon everything that truly means. Until we understand what that meant then and sill means now. ,all attempts to “ save bridge ” will fail.
Oct. 14
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I had the pleasure of being Jill's partner for the 550 hands or so hands we played and she almost never misjudged the cards or distribution as declarer. ( not surprising as she is one of the all time best ) . Even in the expert games that Rosenberg frequents surely you might assume that RHO has the ACE . Therefore ,the slam is cold if you can judge the end position after normal play. For eg RHO will show with 8 major suit cards and therefore rates to be 4-4 rather than 5-3 . For additional backup Martens analysis was particularly cogent for who is getting squashed and how. You will at least reflect when the Spade jack is discarded . Combining table feel with basic probability and simple assumptions gets it done most of the time and the New York times plays are best left to others. You do have to see it though. I suspect that some of the unsuccessful declarers after a spade lead, as we all have done from time to time to be sure, overlooked all the nuances of the end position at trick one.
Oct. 13
Allan Graves edited this comment Oct. 13
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Responder does not Blackwood. but rather continues to pinpoint control location and good agreements regarding shortness. Jump preferences and jump raises defined as to what kind of extras. To what level are various auctions forcing ?. Once you do that the whole thing falls Into place. The point about two suiters is important.
Controls and strength, then fit as opposed to fit then controls and strength. You pick your horse and ride it. Partnerships that play a controls system often bid better over 2C opener not because the method is necessarily superior but because they have actually discussed what the auctions mean and made useful agreements regarding the later rounds of bidding.
Oct. 9
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Yes great player and a good guy
Sept. 30
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My partner Jill Meyers executed the strip squeeze throw in a fast tempo after reading
all the discards accurately .
Sept. 26
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All East’s bidding and play suggest QX H . . Convincing oneself to the contrary is the sort of over thinking that occurs at world championships and must be guarded against . The argument proving that the obvious inferences are incorrect is not compelling enough to negate them . If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck etc
Sept. 22
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Mike Lawrence in one of the greatest bridge books ever “ How to read the opponents cards “ had a section on reading tempo
Sept. 17
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That was back in the days of “ Black Magic “ and Edgar Kaplan’ ground breaking article in the Bridge World . Circus 1958 if memory serves
Sept. 17
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Natural strong 2 bids were one thing and were pretty accurate. Frequency and tactical considerations gave way to more frequent and creative uses of the 2 level and the GF hands were all lumped into two clubs. Marty Harris is on to something for sure. My good friend Kokish always espoused very strong 2 suiters to open at the 1 level and if you don"t want to go full Harris then play very strong 1 bids on 2 suiters , and perhaps a destructive Multi 0-7 with big balanced hands included which leaves your 2C bid mostly one suiters. 2/1 control rsp are very good opposite one suiters ( and opposite balanced hands especially if you can get it done by a 2NT rebid.
Sept. 10
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Keep the screens of course. Get rid of all the paraphernalia that the cheats will always have a field day with. I am not a favourite of online bridge tournaments but we can use bidding machines so that the tray and bid boxes are not needed. Keep the card play.
Aug. 8
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Beautiful eulogy . Thanks Fred.
Aug. 8
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