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All comments by Alvin Bluthman
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Exactly. No control in clubs or hearts is shown by signing off in 4 (the trump suit) or, with a stronger hand, by bidding 4, responder's main side suit, already shown at the two level.
July 16
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Simple. T is trumps (here, hearts or spades). 4T is bidding the trump suit at the four level. X is another suit, such as diamonds in a spade auction, presented above. As for 6X, I don't use the term in this material, but it would mean bidding a side suit at the six level, suggesting a grand slam.
July 16
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This premise is too complicated. But the idea is fairly simple. In a 2/1 GF auction, when offered the opportunity to bid either 3T or 4T, what is the difference?

For example, to Marshall Miles, in BW, if responder makes a 2/1 GF bid, then reverts to 4T, he denies an ace, king, void or singleton, in the two suits. Likewise, 2X, then 4X (showing T) is stronger but also denies the same cards in the other two suits.

Hence, 1 - 2; 2 - 4 might show KJxx Qx AKxxx xx; and 1 - 2; 2 - 4 might show AKxx Qx AKxxx xx. Both are really too strong. But it shows the idea. By contrast, a second round bid of 3 would show an honor control in either clubs or hearts as well as strength in the diamonds and spades bid, while 4 or 4 would show control by shortage (a splinter bid) in the named suit as well as strength in diamonds and spades.
July 16
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment July 16
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Match the colors on bidding box cards. Use larger indexes (bigger numbers/letters on side of cards. Both will make it easier to correctly identify cards for those , who like myself, are visially impaired.
July 14
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17 HCP are aces and kings. Also, only two below average spot cards. If you don't want to treat this hand as 20 in an expert's hands, why treat it as 16-17?

On a more global issue, all this hand really proves is that club players do not bid or play nearly as well as Blue Ribbon players.
July 12
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment July 12
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To me, the North hand is worth a 2NT rebid (I would not be surprised if an expert evaluator opens 2NT). Any decent auction from there, say 1 - 1; 2NT - 3 (forcing); 3 etc. should reach the diamond slam. Once there, you draw trumps, drop the heart loser on the second club; and play for the spade finesse and 3-3 break. Voila! 6 making seven.

Although this might not often happen in your clubs or mine, why is it not a reasonable result?
July 12
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“Dosn't 1♠ then 2♥ show 5c♠/4c♥?”

No. That rule applies if you are responding to partner's opening bid, where you are forcing partner to rebid, allowing you to show your hearts next. None of that applies when partner makes a t/o double. Your non-jump advance of a double promises no values at all; in fact you are denying the values to jump one level. And you need a way to avoid a reverse.
July 12
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If not strong enough to jump, then not nearly strong enough to cuebid 2. This leaves 1 and 1. I choose 1, as do most, because I can show my second suit without reversing, thus without forcing a three-level preference.

As for the idea of bidding 1 if you were strong enough to reverse, with two four card suits, then you would also be strong enough to jump to 2 on the first round.

Mike Lawrence covers this subject in his Complete Book on Takeout Doubles, p. 87. Earlier in the chapter on responding to a t/o double, he makes the points that a one-level response denies strength (because you should make a stronger bid (a jump or cuebid) when you have the values to do so.

As for the fourth option, with a hand such as Kxxx AQxxx xx xx, you would bid 2 initially; with Kxxx AQxx xxx xx, you would not seek to reverse, but would bid 2.
July 10
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“ With a weak hand with, say, 6 diamonds and 4 cards in a major, you likely want to play in 2♦ after a 1♣ opening and a 1NT rebid by opener. But you can no longer do so.”

Actually, you can. After the bypass, just play 2-way NMF, or XYZ. Responder bids 2, relay to 2, which he will pass with this holding. Responder will also initiate an invitational sequence by this relay, continuing the auction as needed.

Today, BWS is that responder will bypass only with four or five diamonds: with five, only with a sub-invitational hand, and always bid the diamonds with six cards (avoiding the use of XYZ)..
July 8
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment July 9
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Sorry. In my first example, I dropped the ace of clubs. This is the full hand I envisioned: as Ax KJxx Axxx Axx;
July 5
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There is no standard for second hand. But there is a good idea for second hand, that seems to deserve becoming the standard. If your holding is such that you want your partner to win when declarer leads low to the queen, (or king, or other honor card in third hand), play the jack. If you want partner to hold up, play another low honor.

Danny Kleinman wrote of this principle, called “The Jake Says Take,” in Bridge World many years ago. It is based on the fdact that every hinor holding with which you would want partner to overtake third hand's honor includes the jack. b
June 26
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2. Trying to get partner to rebid 2NT (or 3NT, weaker) with a diamond stopper. Will raise 2NT to 4NT, inviting slam. There might not be a clearer way to find out if partner can give us four tricks without two red suit losers. If partner raises spades, I'll go back to clubs.
June 23
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Very strong, just under a 2 opening, with running club suit, and a spade stopper. A really strong version of a gambling 3NT. No promise of a heart stopper, but hoping that partner holds one; if not, he should bid 3.
June 22
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“I open a std 1NT (15-17), and partners bids 2♦ to transfer to 2♥. Opponent overcalls 2♠.

What type of hand do I need to respond in these situations? In which cases would I go to 3♥? In what cases would I bid a new suit? Etc.”

Here are some comments on the above.

First, although partner has promised a five-card heart suit, he has not promised any particular level of strength (in standard bidding). So tread carefully.

Absent competition., a 3 bid (called a super-acceptance) normally shows four-card support and an ace-heavy hand, such as Ax KJxx Axxx xx; note the aces in side suits; your trump honors may be lower. Bidding 3 with a hand like this is not a bad idea in competition.

By contrast, doubling 2 is defense=oriented. You probably hold a doubleton heart, and significant honor strength in spades, a hand like KJ9x Ax KQxx !KJx. Let them try to make 2 if your LHO is willing to sit for it.

Other calls may depend on partnership agreements, and are not apparently standardized. I prefer 2NT to show a top-range hand with three or four trumps, headed by KQ or better (two of the top three honors, allowing me to run the suit at notrump most of the time. Others have suggested that new suit bids should show support and and concentrated values in the suit (the Granovetter approach, or (for others) a weak doubleton, an approach which I find to be doubtful. You can also play these bids as natural, suggesting an alternative to partner's trump suit.
June 19
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Yehudit: (((Sorry, fixed)))


I misread the auction. You are on lead against spades or clubs; partner is on lead against notrump.

But that is not all of the story. If you double 3NT, are you asking for a spade lead or for a club lead? If you double 3 in a ;live auction, forcing to game,, what To you mean to be doing?

David Caelisle's hand KJ10x AKQx KJxx x is about the maximum holding, but what do you expect partner to say with a Yarborough and four or five clubs, except pass. I do not expect to defeat 3 doubled, even on a trump lead (to try to prevent declarer from ruffing out his spade losers).
June 18
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment June 19
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Deleted. Sorry.
June 18
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment June 18
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Andy:

While I see the merit of your statement, the definition is as stated. The magazine also maintains that an opener's reverse obliges opener to make his second bid in a higher ranking suit than his first; that is, as you know, not always accurate either. (And, no. The problem is not merely about the so-called “high reverse” of auctions like 1 - 2; 3. Sometimes, naming suits to play in does not begin on the first round at all).

The magazine has also criticized definitions written by others, such as in the June 2019 editorial, commenting on the definitions in the Laws of Bridge.

All I can say on the subject is that it is extremely difficulty to craft definitions intended for use as intellectual premises, rather than merely as descriptors.
June 16
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Bridge World Standard 2017 states “A competitive action is one taken over an opponent's bid, double or redouble. A competitive action taken in direct position immediately follows an opponent's action; one taken in reopening position follows an opponent's action and two passes.”
June 15
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Are you asking for a term to refer to the following: (a) a bid to the immediate left of a bid which is a one-round force, I. e. a pass by the bidder's LHO will not end the auction; and (b) by the partner of the overcalller. “Advancer” is used for the player in the (b) auction. I don't know of a word for the (a) auction.
June 15
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment June 15
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If the positive 3 bid promises a side ace or king, together with the diamond suit, then North should bid 6. End of story. (((FN))) However, it might not have that promise. E. G. South might have shown only AKQxxx or the like. If so, then North cannot, at that stage, be secure in bidding the slam. What South priomises depends on partnership methods, which we do not know. The same is true of the 3 bid - is it a spade control, or a spade suit?

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(((FN))): Except that, in the very rare case in which responder holds TWO such cards, one of them will be the king of hearts, and he can draw the necessary inference and raise to s3even hearts.
June 10
Alvin Bluthman edited this comment June 11
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