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All comments by Anne Farmer
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It's great you are teaching your grandson how to play! Also- think about starting a program at a local school- here at Seattle NextGenBridge we are at many Middle schools. Our colleagues all over the US & CA teach from elementary- HS. At the summer NABC there is a 3 day YNABC just for kids- soon in Las Vegas July 25-27. Ask your grandson to invite his friends and teach them too. Kids prefer to play with their peers. We got an excellent volunteer and Board Member who plays after his grandson signed up for our after school bridge class. Also- keep it fun, not too serious and introduce new concepts as he is ready- do not overwhelm him with too much at once. There are many good books, youtube online tutorials- we especially like Pete Hollands, Matthew's Twitch series, Patty Tucker's bridge in a Box, Easybridge and A Taste of Bridge book for beginners. Practice on BBO, phone apps, etc. with the bots will help a lot. Way to go- let's get many more young people to play.
July 12
Anne Farmer edited this comment July 12
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Seattle NextGenBridge has Pete on our website- he rocks- and our kids love his accent too.
March 31
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Ladies & Gentleman-
Let's talk about efforts to bring bridge to youth. FYI- we are doing just that. There are many programs across the country in schools, camps, etc. that give many kids who have no clue what bridge is the opportunity to experience our game. Kudos to you, Matthew for a great, innovative & brilliant idea using Twitch to broaden kids interest in bridge! Thanks so much.
I agree we'd all love to see more bridge for young people and I constantly ask members of the duplicate bridge community and social players to get involved and suggest ways to help. There is not enough promotion being done and most importantly- we need more volunteers to help us bring it to the next generation. You don't need to be a great player. The best teachers are those with a passion who enjoy teaching. Its much harder to teach kids than adults. But the return is worth it- after all- they are our future. So get on out there and do the community outreach it takes- talk to schools, clubs, libraries, parents. Get a list of neighborhood fairs & setup a bridge booth- you can pitch classes for both kids & adults. Put up flyers around town, offer to do demos at coffeeshops, etc. Call your local tv & radio stations and offer to talk about bridge. C'mon- let's put on out thinking caps and go get ‘em. It’s not that hard- but it does take a lot of work to make it happen.
Yesterday- 3/23-Seattle NextGenBridge kids were presenting our programs at the Gates Discovery Center at Teen Action Fair. They are stellar ambassadors for our sport. Many new kids came by the tables, sat in and as a result we got a new school and an offer for more places for the kids to play. Here in Seattle, we are all committed to the kids- clubs, schools, parks & rec, CLCs, libraries- all pitch in. So here's my challenge for those only whining about how our game is not being saved for future generations- stop complaining and do something about it- there's so much you can do. I'm available to talk to anybody interested in setting up a school program in your area during the Las Vegas NABC. As Youth Liason Chair of the 2019 YNABC, I humbly ask for your help in volunteering July 25-27. We need table monitors, and light help with setup, etc. Thanks to all of my collegues across the US & Canada who are bringing bridge to the next generation. I will see you in Las Vegas.
March 24
Anne Farmer edited this comment March 24
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Hi Jim- Yay- way to go! Please contact me & I'll be glad to relate what works for us in Seattle.
Anne
Dec. 31, 2018
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Thank you, Mike for posting this. Everyone needs to step up to the plate to teach the kids- it doesn't take much- start with a couple- ask them to invite their friends and voila- you have a new table of bridge kids! Please read my article in the Dec. 2018 Bridge Bulletin to see what's up with kids learning bridge in Seattle. As the Youth Liason Chair for the 2019 YNABC in Las Vegas, I am very happy to see people reaching out to the kids. We need volunteers- July 25-27, especially for July 25 so please email me if you can help. Thanks so much.
Anne
Dec. 31, 2018
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This is such a wonderful exciting event. I wish they would fix the tech & broadcast issues before the start of the play so we could all watch it.
Aug. 14, 2018
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Thanks Debbie for explaining the structure of the games. I met some of the young people headed there in Atlanta. We have some up & coming players in Seattle. You, Mike, Joe, Al & the USBF/ WBF fab mentors have done a great job. All of us in Seattle are proud of the US participants. Way to go! You guys rock!
Aug. 9, 2018
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Kudos to all involved with the YNABC! Best attended, best organization- area & setup was great- kids had own contained area, best food, best overall- great job everyone- way to go! Thanks very much for the hard work to support our youth bridge!
Aug. 8, 2018
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Thank you, Richard. Do you teach young people to play bridge? We need volunteers everywhere to get on board and reach out to the kids. Its a game for them too and the rewards are so worth it. It's a fun way to get back in the game and challenging. Sharing your stories and experiences in the bridge world helps the kids see possibilities with bridge. You're in the right place to get involved with youth teaching. Thanks again.
July 7, 2018
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Thank you so much and please give my regards to Mike. Also are you going to Atlanta? You can find me volunteering at the YNABC Aug 2-4 and I'm looking for partners for the evening 7:30 pm 299ers side games Wed. Aug 1- Aug. 4. Game on!
July 6, 2018
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Hello Steve-
Thank you for the lovely compliment. Are you in Cinncinati? That youth bridge program rocks too! In my experience- there is no one right outline or method that works best. I'll be glad to share our approach which is similar across the country. Some programs work with younger youth- elementary students, some with high schoolers. Our program is designed for Middle School. We use readily available materials from ACBL website & links, and online various sources. Usually we start with play of the hand, then bidding. We follow the ACBL 16 hr general curriculum and like our colleagues across the country and Canada with programs for youth we are lucky to have a plethora of materials to choose from. We incorporate a variety of lessons but its mostly experiential- hands on- the play's the thing- and we keep it light & fun. Usually a 5 minute new concept is enough and we review a lot. We take breaks as needed. Sometimes we watch you tube bridge tutorials for a diversion. Our kids play online or phone apps which helps them play in tempo.
Luckily SNGB has a great Board of Directors and an entire proactive bridge community dedicated to sharing our game with new generations. There is a very high skill level here with educators, directors, pro players, etc. many of whom have volunteered their time for the kids. The advance/ administrative work before classes start is considerable. We contact potential new schools and our returning ones starting in May for the next school year to begin assessing our volunteer teacher and equipment needs. In July and beginning of Aug we finalize our schools and get promo materials- posters/ flyers out to the incoming 6th graders, parents & teachers. We decided initially on 4 Middle schools since our primary partner, Seattle Parks & Recreation- had the infrastructure in place by providing after school enrichment/ recreation classes there. Prior to the start of the class term, we do at least 2-3 “dog & pony shows” usually lunchroom presentations where we turn over 4 dummy hands and let the kids throw cards. Many kids have no clue what bridge is so they get to see a preview of the game. If it interests them- we sign them up. Each teacher can choose whatever approach works best for them within ACBL guidelines. Some start with Minibridge, some let the kids throw cards and learn the terms, start with point count and so forth. The Middle school students seem more willing to try new things including bridge. In Seattle- at the high school level, the structure is different. HS students must already play bridge or whatever activity and initiate with the schools ASB (Associated Student Body) their desire to start a Bridge Club. Now we have enough students doing just that. It took a few years for it to happen as we slowly built our student base.
Before we started SNGB, we did lots of due diligence speaking to many folks across the country about what works best for their programs. We compared notes and shared ideas. We learned a lot and I thank everyone who helped me with suggestions, I talked to some outstanding people getting SNGB started. Among them are Patty Tucker, Joe Stokes, Deb Rosenberg, Al Levy, Bryan Delfs, Stephanie Threlkeld, Matt Kidd, Jeff Bayonne, Jeff Lehman, Donna Compton, Kathy Lane, Mike Purcell, Flo Belford and the many others who have been running great programs for kids in other cities. We have had a 2 week Bridge for Youth Day Camp for about 5 years here in the summer too.
Each metro area has its challenges. Seattle has major traffic congestion making it hard for volunteers to physically get to schools as they are very scattered. We do 1 weekly 90 minute classes M-Thur, none on Friday and match volunteer teachers with schools close to them. One school we are trying this year does have a Saturday class. The volunteers pick the day. Since there is little consistency in the school session formats we vary the structure a bit. Something we found that works well is a “tag-team” approach to teaching. We send 2 teachers and helpers if possible to each school in the beginning of each session. As we have attrition like other programs, the teachers can alternate weeks or vary schedules as needed- which lessens time commitment for them. This year we are doing 2 tournaments- one right before the Holidays. Following soon after our spring Annual tournament, is an I/N which we hope to start a Youth section at. We are also only teaching bridge in the Fall and Winter/ spring sessions, moving up our Annual Intramural SNGB Tournament to end of March/ beginning of April. When the kids finally taste competition they are more inclined to play more. I wish there was a “boilerplate” one size fits all answer but there is not. We go with the flow as needed to accommodate the students, schools and everything else. Best of luck and keep up the wonderful work in the upcoming school year.
Kindest Regards- Anne
July 6, 2018
Anne Farmer edited this comment July 7, 2018
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