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All comments by Art Korth
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If you can outplay the field then it makes sense to play the same contracts as the field.
an hour ago
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The idea that this hand is outside of the range of a 1NT opening is just wrong for two reasons.

First, it is important to convey as much information as quickly as possible. Even if this hand is slightly heavy for a 15-17 1NT opening, it gets the message across about hand type and strength in a clear and unambiguous manner in a single call.

Second, we do not play this game in a vacuum. It is more difficult for the opponents to intervene safely over a 1NT opening bid than over a 1 opening bid. Making life more difficult for the opponents is often at least as important as making life easier for our side.

It is my experience that opening 1NT as often as possible tends to work out well for my side and less well for the opponents. Occasionally missing a better game or slam in a minor suit is a trade off I am willing to accept.
6 hours ago
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Actually, I can remember an instance of a procedural penalty being imposed in live play. In a regional swiss match about 6 months ago, against some prominent players, my partnership was assessed a 1 VP penalty for an improperly disclosed defense against the opponents' strong club opening. We had recently changed our defense and we had not yet changed our convention card.
8 hours ago
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Procedural penalties exist almost exclusively on Bridgewinners - not in the real world.

I cannot remember the last time I saw or heard of a PP imposed in actual play.
March 18
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If East thought he was making a DONT double, then he should self-alert.

Having said that, I do not see how NS were damaged. Clearly, neither E nor W had any UI. So they can bid what they want to bid. They are allowed to get lucky.

Are you suggesting that either N or S would take an action that would result in a better result if informed that the double was DONT?

It does not matter what other EW pairs might have done. This E bid his hearts and got to 4. The best that NS can do is bid to 5 and go for 300. Are you suggesting that it is possible for NS to bid to 5?
March 15
Art Korth edited this comment March 15
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John: There was no irregularity. The only thing that happened was that a board was played one segment too early. That should not trigger any of the adjustments that you refer to.

A board that is supposed to be played (eventually) was played. A result was obtained on the board. Where is the grounds for any sort of adjustment?

Sometimes common sense just has to prevail.
March 13
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The board was played to a valid result. The result should stand. The board had to be played in any event, so I can't think of any reason why the result should not stand.
March 13
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“Is east good enough for a 3♠ bid?”

I don't know. But the hand that East held certainly justifies a 3 bid.
March 13
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This auction occurred this past Saturday morning at a one-session Sectional Open Pairs. The side that bid to 7 was not a very experienced pair.

I commented at the time that I believed that this was the first and last recorded instance of this auction:

All vul

3 - P - 7 - P
P - 7 - All Pass

7 was making on a finesse. 7 was down 6.

My partner (the 7 bidder) decided that these two opponents would not bid 7 in this manner unless they had about 18 tricks. He was correct (with the winning finesse). So he decided with 5530 shape to take a shot at something other than -2140. The failure to double was unexplainable.

And, yes, the opps could make 2220. But that is not the issue.

By the way, we scored 22.5 out of 25 for this result. Not getting a top is not earthshattering news, as this was a very uneven field. But the half-matchpoint?
March 12
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The problem says “doubling.” Whether this includes “redoubles” is a matter of semantics. I would answer the question both ways - with and without redoubles.

This question has been answered in many places. I just can't put my finger on one at this time.
Feb. 22
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In my experience, passing the redouble at the one level says I have nothing to say. Penalty doubles at the one level are quite rare, and it does not pay to cater to them.

However, at any higher level, the pass of the redouble should be a penalty pass. One cannot allow the opponents to talk you out of your penalty pass by redoubling.
Feb. 20
Art Korth edited this comment Feb. 20
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As the Hideous Hog said, no bid is truly bad if it provokes an even worse bid by the opposition.
Feb. 19
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Deleted.
Feb. 18
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No. For 4NT to be key card for spades there has to be suit agreement. That is easily accomplished by bidding 3 over 2NT.
Feb. 2
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How light do you open the bidding? Even opposite most light opening bids, the North hand looks like a slam bid rather than an invite.

Does the 2NT rebid show extras? Does it show full values? Or, looking at this another way, what would a 2 rebid show?
Feb. 1
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I seem to recall another thread dealing with a similar situation. The solution (if it is really a solution) is to have Harry at a table that is not in competition with the rest of the game. Pairs that come to Harry's table are essentially sitting out one round. The hands played at Harry's table are not in play in the main game.

If Harry is as oblivious as you portray, this won't matter to him. And it preserves the integrity of the game. It doesn't do anything for Harry's difficulties or the problems of those who play with and against him, but at least the hands are not in play in the game.
Jan. 29
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If you agreed Landy and never had another word of discussion on the topic, it is unlikely that you would run into a hand where it mattered. I don't think this is one - both partners could have bid more without any fancy agreements.
Jan. 26
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I voted for “Dave should sleep on the couch” (among other positive answers) on the general principle which is demonstrated by this quip:

If a man is in the forest and there is no woman around to hear him, is he still wrong?

(By the way, congrats on cashing your four aces!)
Jan. 25
Art Korth edited this comment Jan. 25
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Deleted.
Jan. 25
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