Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Avon Wilsmore
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
With zero defensive tricks, I dislike 1.
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I am heartily opposed to:
- collusive cheating
- the efforts of authorities to cover-up the facts

Does anyone imagine that both have ceased?

As for, “… both of them have been dead for years and can't defend themselves”, Forquet and Garozzo are very much alive and were provided with chapters of my book.

No reply.

Boye Brogeland:
We will never know the full extent to which bridge has been damaged by cheaters, but understanding the past can only help in achieving a vital goal: A clean game, now and in the future.
June 12
Avon Wilsmore edited this comment June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The fact is, we don't get much in the way of rationality from the R-S defenders… this one takes the cake:

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/another-reese-schapiro-hand/?cj=816244
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Dunno if this is what we are looking for…

http://www.bridgeguys.com/Conventions/carding/cincinnati_leads.html
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
So what is your view?

Fabrication, conspiracy and collusion?
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We are told that the signal for five hearts was a Roman “V”… after all, Reese was a Classics scholar.
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Over the years, I have learnt how to make a Reese apologist disappear.

Just say, “The Oakie Notes”, and they vanish.
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You can read more about Jais, Trezel, Garozzo and Belladonna here:

https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/more-weirdness-from-the-1971-bowl/


Meanwhile, Hamman, Swanson, Wolff and I all published books that make it very clear (no insinuations) we each believe the Blue Team players used illicit signals.

The lack of cheating convictions (even of Facchini-Zuchelli!) have more to do with the WBF policy of “minimise the scandal” than any analysis and review of the facts.
June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
“Schapiro sitting East at favourable vulnerability…”

Not true.

Kleinman quotes Reese:

Here East has a borderline overcall at the score. Obviously he would be inclined to make the overcall if he knew his partner held five hearts. Once again, the opponent at the other table did overcall. Although both spades and hearts lie badly, East-West can save advantageously in Five Hearts.

Kleinman:

An overcall should show a good suit in a hand of some playing strength for offensive purposes. Reese and Schapiro consistently omitted making bad overcalls with 5-5 heart fits, perhaps because it seemed safer to “balance” after the enemy auction died out. See the other examples resembling this, US #35 (another 5-5 heart fit) and US #39 (a 4-4 heart fit).

Nonetheless, I thought it a bit unlike Schapiro not to overcall 1 on this deal—under the vulnerability conditions shown by Reese, “North-South vulnerable.” So once again I checked the vulnerability conditions for Board 141. Another typo in Reese’s book (and repeated, incidentally, in Truscott’s book): both sides are vulnerable. As it turns out, a 5 sacrifice would be unprofitable. East-West must lose two spade tricks, one club, one diamond and one heart, as South is void of hearts. But notice that if hearts split 2-1, then 5 doubled, though down “only” 500, would still not be a good save. For against 5, East-West could then take a heart trick in addition to their spade and diamond, to beat it one trick. There are reasons not to overcall on bad suits with unexciting distribution, even when a fit is assured. At the other table, despite East’s unsound 1 overcall, East-West never bid beyond 3, and North-South reached 4. No bad saves, even for the Argentine pair trailing by 200 IMPs or so in the match.



Kleinman is being charitable with “typo”… Reese has another self-serving vulnerability “typo” in his book.

Edit: typo
June 12
Avon Wilsmore edited this comment June 12
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Italy v GB, board 56.


♠4
♥Q763
♦AJ10963
♣K9
Reese Schapiro
♠Q9 ♠108752
♥AKJ942 ♥8
♦75 ♦Q82
♣1054 ♣AQ72
♠AKJ63
♥105
♦K4
♣J863
WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
1♥ 2♦ pass 2♠
pass 3♦ (all pass)


Kleinman quotes Reese:

If I know my partner has a singleton heart, it must be better tactics to pass originally…

When East led 8 against Three Diamonds, I won with the King and returned a club. Obviously we could beat the contract only if partner had two tricks in clubs. I had visions of him making two clubs, then putting my back with the Ace of hearts. Now a third heart will establish a trump trick for the defence as the cards lie, for East’s 8 will force dummy’s King.

If I know that partner has a singleton heart I must cash the second heart at once and hope that the defence will come to two clubs, two hearts and a trump.



Kleinman:

That seems like Reese’s best hope in any event. When Schapiro shows up with the two club tricks (ace and queen) for which Reese is playing him, surely declarer won’t also play Schapiro for the guarded queen of diamonds on the bidding. Reese’s visions of an uppercut are thus unnecessary. Even without knowledge of East’s singleton heart, I would expect a defender as gifted as Reese to cash the A just to cater to the possibility. The only sound reason for not cashing the second heart would be knowledge (in this case, false) that East had a doubleton.

I don’t see that knowledge of East’s singleton heart should deter West from opening 1 with such a good 6-card suit…



For my money, the one thing that demolishes any and every argument in favour of Reese-Schapiro is the Oakie Notes.

I showed the photocopy that is found in Truscott's book to Tim Seres (until then, a R-S supporter).

TS: They were cheating. There is no other explanation.
June 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The typo is my error, not Kleinmans… now corrected to:

8 KQ942 J63 10852.
June 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We agree that Kaplan-Sheinwold (and Roth-Stone) used controlled psyches. We know this is so because they documented them.

- Can you find any reference to the use of a psychic-checkback by Reese-Schapiro or, indeed, any top UK pair of the day?

- Why is it Reese did not mention this convention while discussing this deal in his book?
June 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The last third of Danny Kleinman's “Bridge Internationals, Famous and Infamous” is a detailed analysis of Reese and Schapiro's actions at the 1965 Bermuda Bowl.

Near the end:

I find Reese’s Story of an Accusation to be a masterpiece of deception, containing erroneous representations of vulnerability conditions on at least two boards, many unsubstantiated characterizations of bids as “normal” when they aren’t, unnecessarily vague language, and frequent non-sequiturs.

I also think that Reese found it hard to conceal his contempt for Schapiro in writing this book. Schapiro seldom knew how to use illicit knowledge about heart length in the subtle ways in which it might have proved profitable. Instead his erratic bids often exceeded tolerance; and what’s worse, posed the toughest dilemmas for Reese, who was almost equally concerned to stay within tolerance and to profit from his knowledge of Schapiro’s heart length.
June 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, indeed, many thanks to Dale for posting that link.

Trivia time.. does anyone have any details about the “Duncan New Dimension System”? I can find only one other mention…

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/03/10/archives/bridge-touring-stars-in-first-loss-bowing-to-washington-team.html
June 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Steve Eginton writes:

Rather strange, since they were supposed to know each others hands, that they reached them in the first place.

Steve, can you name anyone who ever said that any Blue Team pair “knew each others (sic) hands”?
June 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
New York Times Bridge Book:

As [Ira Rubin] began play [in the 1976 Bermuda Bowl final]… he noticed… Belladonna had a cigarette in his mouth… on the table in front of him was a cigarette lighter which he would click occasionally during the bidding. Rubin did not have a lighter, but he had a pen, and joined in with occasional clicks of his own.


Here is another Garozzo hand:

1965 Bermuda Bowl Final, bd 23, both vul.
KQ7 104 9843 A854

P P P 1

P 1 P P

X

With 4-4 in the opponent's suits, Garozzo doubled. Luckily, Forquet had a 5-5-1-2


And another Garozzo hand:

1967 Bermuda Bowl Final, bd 42, both vul.
J AQ1053 AKJ82 102

1 1
2 2
?

Garozzo rebid 3. Luckily, Forquet had a 6-3-0-4.


I'm prepared to bet that my list of Garozzo hands is longer than anyone's list of excuses.
June 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Agree - with a fit and insufficient high-cards for game, get to the three-level asap.
June 5
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Here is a hand:

1961 Bermuda Bowl Final, board 5; they are vul
QJ1063 !A932 A4 96
1H ?
Garozzo passed. Partner Forquet had one spade and a four-count.


Here is a comment from Mike Becker:

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/the-talk-that-never-was-the-blue-team-rule/?cj=707221


Here is a related comment from Bobby Wolff:

Bobby Wolff:

A situation that I haven’t told yet occurred in 1983 in Stockholm. We were the finalist team playing [Italy] in a 176-board final. The scores were always close throughout, but with about 64 boards to go, I talked to Benito (after hearing G2 [military intelligence] from my spies) that when they weren’t playing against Hamman and me, both of them took cigarette lighters* to the screened tables. I asked Benito (in a stairwell between floors) to please stop bringing lighters to the table with them. He looked quizzical and I then offered, Bob and I also will promise to not making any noise whereupon he made what is to me a worthwhile quote, “I’m not worried about either one of you and never have been.” In any event, he agreed and the noises stopped and we were very happy and totally thrilled to have won the match by 5 IMP’s thanks to the last two hands of the match.
June 4
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
But his partners have aged terribly,.,
June 4
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well, there was a famous Seres hand at a world championship… he didn't bother making the final pass, he just led a trump to 1CXX.
June 4
.

Bottom Home Top