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All comments by Avon Wilsmore
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Sion-Cokin should have paid royalties.
Sept. 17
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Many of the comments above have zero relevance.

World championships were won from 1957-1959, 1961-1969 and 1972, by two great players, one very strong player and some chooks.

I again quote Anders Wirgren, who went over every board:

“I am convinced that the Blue Team players signalled their strength… because their timing was always perfect: they overbid when partner had extra values, but underbid when he had nothing. *Always*.

t is impossible to have such accuracy, *unless you know something you shouldn’t*.”
Sept. 17
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Your view of how Roman Club played takeout doubles is not in accord with the Roman Club books.

Roman Club, Avarelli & Belladonna, 1959:
“Immediate take-out double (by South) over East’s opening bid:
Holding 12-16 points with 4=4=3=2, 4=4=4=1, 5=4=3=1 or 5=4=2=2 distribution and the opening suit coinciding with your shortest suit.
(Can also be made occasionally with distributions of 4=3=3=3 or 5=3=3=2 when the doubleton is in the suit bid by the opponent.)”


Roman Club, Avarelli & Belladonna, 1969:
Informatory Double in Second Position of a Suit Bid.
…The requirements for the double are 12-16 points with 4=4=3=2, 4=4=4=1, 5=4=3=1 or 5=4=2=2 distributions, where the long suits are not the same as the suit opened. 4=3=3=3 and 5=3=3=2 (with the doubleton in the suit opened) are also permissible."


The World Championship system notes do not show any different approach.

How Avarelli & Belladonna were permitted to play a method that in no way matched their written agreements is beyond me.
Sept. 17
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There *are* countries outside the USA, but the savages there are too stupid to understand bridge.
Sept. 17
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Danny Kleinman:

“To give and receive illicit signals in such a way as to escape detection and still show a profit is a delicate task. Few bridge players are up to it…”
Sept. 17
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I have read your “1925-1945” essay and regard it as fine work, free of any “issues”.

I cannot say the same about Forquet's book.

In my book, I quote Oren Kriegel:

The less-than-total honesty of “Bridge with the Blue Team” has been brought up before. A review of a new printing of the work in the August 1997 Bridge World quotes its earlier review from July 1983: The deals “are presented as if played by Forquet and his teammates while compiling their incredible record…(indeed, many of the deals *were* played by Blue Team stars)…” (emphasis in the original).
Sept. 17
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My advice is, wait until after Orlando and order it from Paul Lavings.

http://www.bridgegear.com/
Sept. 17
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And as for “Are bookies' odds relevant?”… consider this hypothetical situation:

Federer is about to play Nadal in the final of Grand Slam event. You happen to check with Ladbrokes and see that one player is 20/1.

Which more closely represents your thoughts?

- “How nice! What a good opportunity! Ladbrokes is giving money away”

- “Eeek!! Someone knows something I don't!”


Follow the money.
Sept. 16
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All your questions are addressed in the book.

I put considerable effort into verification.

Example:

You will find the account of the reading of the Gerber Letter in the May, 1995 issue of Bridge d'Italia.

I speak no Italian, so an Italian friend and I sat and did the translation.

I sought further verification… from the book:

“We see that Eric Jannersten, Swedish expert and founder of the IBPA, was present. I contacted his son, Per, to enquire if he knew anything about the Gerber Letter. In fact, Per was at St Vincent and recalls his parents discussing it.”
Sept. 16
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Horrible news.

All I can say is, I have been in discussion with some good people and have optimism for the future.

Sorry to be so vague, but there is much of which I cannot currently speak.
Sept. 16
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Richard:

In the book, I discuss in detail the events of 1975, when the US team did not want to play in the final. They were told they would be barred from playing in America for quite some time.

You write:
“To accuse a bridge writer of deal falsification and plagiarism, without adducing any evidence, is in my view defamatory.”

“…adducing any evidence”?

What do you suppose is in the book?

You have also labelled my work, “libellous.”

Why? You are a lawyer with expert knowledge in this area?

Every page of my book has been studied at length by over a dozen world-class bridgeplayers. Lawyers have given the green light.

Meanwhile, here is proof of deal fabrication:

https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/bridge-without-the-blue-team/
Sept. 16
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Srs Forquet and Garozzo have seen chapters of my book.

They declined to comment.
Sept. 16
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When and where the book will first be available has already been stated, above.

“Tails” is one of many errors you have made in recent posts. I am hoping this is due to a lack of coffee.
Sept. 16
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Are you aware that Roman Club and Neapolitan Club were devised in the early-mid 1950s?
Sept. 16
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- There was no betting coup. The odds were posted by a London firm of bookmakers; I believe this was quite common in that era. The book has Wolff's account of the matter.

Speaking for myself, I can recall books being run on major events in AU in the 1970s. The prices on offer were a plain assessment of of each pair's/team's chances.

- Your point about the creation of Roman/Neapolitan is excellent. Some world-class players are of the view that those systems were put in place to disguise what was going on.
Sept. 16
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A look through the WC records of 1957-1959 makes it painfully-obvious that a US psycher's partner had no clue.

Rather than take Franklin's one-sentence review as gospel, you can review every deal in the 1957 and 1959 finals for yourself:

http://www.bridgetoernooi.com/index.php/home/bermuda/1957/Bermuda%20Bowl/0

http://www.bridgetoernooi.com/index.php/home/bermuda/1959/Bermuda%20Bowl/0

That said, I make clear reference to some US players' highly-suspect actions in a chapter, “New Science and That Old Black Magic”
Sept. 16
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How much can a koala bear?

I did not “draw attention to a very specific figure. 1752 hands…”

For illustrative purposes, on p19, I assigned a fictional question to “an alert reader”

The hands form part of my case. But forget them; they are only a part of my book.

Explain:
- the 21/1 odds in favour of the BT, after the Aces had won the qualifying rounds
- Belladonna's trick-two shift here:
http://www.bridgetoernooi.com/index.php/home/pbn2deal/857

A multi-time world champion described this as, “the bridge equivalent of rape”

Or maybe Belladonna pulled the wrong card…

EDIT: addition after “odds”
Sept. 16
Avon Wilsmore edited this comment Sept. 16
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The Burgay Tape was not a data set, just the mother of all cover-ups.

Why the secrecy?

Nothing to hide? Then release it.
Sept. 16
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As for your first two questions, I have no idea what you are talking about.

500 hands?? From where do you get that number? The WC books for 1957, 1958 and 1959 have all 244, 164 and 156 hands in the final.

Does my book discuss only hands from WC finals?

No.

Quite apart from examining all BT hands from every WC event, I did a search in, and examined all results from:

google.com
bridgebase.com/forums/
bridgewinners.com
groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/rec.games.bridge
news.google.com/newspapers
newspapers.com
nytimes.com/

for any instance of:
Avarelli, Belladonna, Forquet, Siniscalco, Chiaradia, Garozzo, Perroux, Blue Team, Mario Franco, D'Alelio, Pittala, Pabis-Ticci, Burgay, Ortiz-Patino, Firpo, Facchini, Zucchelli, Benito Bianchi, Arturo Franco, Pittala, Antonio Vivaldi, Carlo Mosca, Alvin Roth, Tobias Stone, Sidney Silodor, Blue Club, Roman Club, Neapolitan Club and more.

And then there were the searches through every available Daily Bulletin…

If you have further questions, I am happy to send you the 235 entries from the References section at the end of the book.
Sept. 16
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