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All comments by Avon Wilsmore
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The World Record for doubling with length in the opponent's one-level suit opening must surely go to Siniscalco, while playing with Forquet.

1958 Bermuda Bowl Final, board 35
Q92 Q AJ10743 A98

Sinsicalco's RHO, Tobias Stone, dealt and opened 1.

Siniscalco doubled.
July 25
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So, what's the punchline?

What's the full deal and what are the author's thoughts about the right line and how to arrive at it?
July 24
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On the first hand, partner Avarelli had:
9 AJ7432 876 K83

He passed when his RHO raised to 3.


On the second hand, partner Belladonna had a 0-2-6-5
They bid to the making 6m and doubled the 6M sacrifice.

Norman Kay, after opponent's 1S opening, passed throughout with Avarelli's hand.
July 23
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I certainly would not classify a double of 1 with a 3-3-4-3 as “offshape”.


1962 Bermuda Bowl final, board 122
Belladonna
Q106 10 AK1054 QJ95
1 X


1968 Olympiad final, board 22
Avarelli
8643 10 AK63 AQ98
1 X


Now those are offshape takeout doubles.
July 23
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Nicolas: We were certainly looking at different things.

I searched for deals where Blue Team players made a lead that:
- almost no strong player would choose
- suited partner very well indeed

Example:
1958 Bermuda Bowl final, board 142
53 8653 A53 AJ94

After a strong 1NT, Stayman, and opener's 2S raised to game, Chiaradia, winner of six consecutive Bermuda Bowls, led a low diamond.


Two such Avarelli leads (that startled Lawrence and Goldman in 1972) are mentioned here:

https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/another-look-at-walter-avarelli/

That article also shows Avarelli hands that a strong club-level player would play and defend much better.
July 20
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Another give-away is a poor dummy-player and an amazingly-accurate opening leader… e.g, Walter Avarelli.
July 20
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More on adjustments…

https://www.newbridgelaw.com/
July 18
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If the opponents heard “low club” and want the ace played, I'd be putting the 4x2 to a different use.
July 18
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Maybe it was a selfie…
July 15
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East has a 9 loser hand, why should he get excited?

Because he has a 10-card fit and partner is 5+-5+ in the majors.

What would East have bid with a 3-2-5-3?
July 14
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With a ten-card fit, East bids 2?

Hmmm…
July 14
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I'm inclined to think it was Ashleigh Brilliant.

https://www.ashleighbrilliant.com/

Be reasonable! See it my way!
July 12
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If it's the hand where he drops the doubleton Q, while my memory failed me on the strip-squeeze, I recall there is some other better line.

Anyway, I will leave further talk to those with access to the text.
July 11
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I wondered about that hand from when I first read it in 1974… why not (from memory) the strip-squeeze?
July 11
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This is all upside-down.

No one disputes that psyches were common in the 1950s. Yes, R-S psyched a lot, even vulnerable, as did Jais-Tezel.

“Reese-Schapiro were psyching along with plenty of other people,” is not a key issue.

A key question is, Where are the bad boards?

I can find no instance of R-S, J-T or the Blue Team making a psyche and getting punished. The majority were of junk opposite junk.

When Blue Team players psyche a response in a major and partner never raises with four-card support, what are we supposed to think? Is “How many other players of that era psyche?” the right question?

If you want to see deals where the partner of a psycher is clearly in the dark, look at the US pkayers in the 1958 Bowl.
July 9
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I wasn't trying to be mean… and I agree that the pro deals dilute the quality.

I recall, in the early 80s, playing a Monday night event against Seres-Cummings, Richman-Reiner and Lavings-McMahon.

Only PL keeps chugging along…
July 9
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By “Monday night”, the author means, the last night of the “Bill Shaufelberger Memorial State Teams Championship”

http://www.nswba.com.au/tourn/res.asp?yr=2019&dir=champ/scht&H=1

It's not replete with super-experts, but not so weak, either.
July 9
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As I mentioned above, I will look into PDF scans of my WC books when I get to Thailand (soon).

I will put 1965 first and let you know how that goes.
July 9
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