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All comments by Avon Wilsmore
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One cannot “tend to guarantee”; the two terms do not mesh.

Before the auction, partner's expected spade length is 3 and a bit. Suppose we have 8 hearts and RHO opens a genuine 5CM 1H. Now that partner has 13 non-hearts, his expected spade length has gone up, n'est pas?
Jan. 21, 2014
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Yes, club games are something else, as are the post-mortems.

In a weak club game we defended 4 and took the first six tricks - two black aces and four trumps on a cross-ruff.

A furious dummy whipped out the traveller, examined the results and shouted at his partner: “You could have made that!”
Jan. 9, 2014
Avon Wilsmore edited this comment Jan. 11, 2014
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There is no clear reasoning in favour of an unsafe non-trump lead. A trump lead is pretty sound - won't cost, may prevent a ruff.
Jan. 7, 2014
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“Misgivings” is right. Reading “Poorly Made in China” changed my buying habits for good. And it was The Economist “Book of the Year”, so it's not hysterical nonsense.

One conclusion is that any contract with a Chinese firm is worthless and unenforceable. Good luck to the WBF; they may well need it.
Jan. 7, 2014
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Agree. Responder needs to be able to choose what the opponents will see.

When responder has a void or a wild shape (7420) or an 8 card suit he should declare, the better to make the cash-out difficult. With, say, 7222, put that down as dummy and conceal the high-cards.
Jan. 7, 2014
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Your use of the term of “uppercut” is incorrect.
http://www.bridgebum.com/uppercut.php

You may have a trump promotion going, but it is not an uppercut.



Jan. 7, 2014
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The old line about American paranoia being behind cheating accusations/scandals has been long discredited.

- 1954, Figeac and Bodier banned from playing; internal inquiry in France

- 1957, Schneider (2nd 1954 BB) & Reithoffer (President, Austrian Bridge Fed.) “encouraged” to retire from bridge by Ortiz-Patino - signalling

- 1961, Bourchtoff & Delmouly (Olympiad champions) banned by French Bridge Fed.from playing in '61 BB, for signalling,

- 1963, John Gerber, capt of US BB team in Italy is handed a letter that documents the cheating methods of the Blue Team. The letter is in Italian; JG refuses to listen past 1st para and hands letter to Italian captain. Perroux reads it to his team; no doubt Garozzo & Forquet will be happy to tell us what it said.

- 1971, Jais & Trezel have their “exotic” opening leads and switches called out in advance by a Brazilian player as they play on VG at the BB

1974, Manoppo brothers banned after WBF enquiry into actions at a Far East championship

1976, Leandro Burgay tapes Benito Bianchi discussing Blue Team signalling methods

2005, Lanzarotti & Buratti banned at European Championships
Jan. 5, 2014
Avon Wilsmore edited this comment Jan. 25, 2014
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So, there are two books that discuss the K-C hands.

Kleinman's Bridge Scandal in Houston (4th ed, 146 pages) covers the bidding and play of every hand and has fascinating material on the ACBL actions/law suit and discussions of third-party analysis of K-C's actions. The book was long out of print but the new edition is available:
dannyk13@ca.rr.com

Anyone who wants to read another amazing ACBL “how to turn a cheating accusation into a complete disaster” story can check out Cameroon French's extraordinary account of the 1979 Sion-Cokin affair:
http://cam.bridgeblogging.com/2008/04/06/collateral-damage-i/
Dec. 27, 2013
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There aren't enough groupies.
Dec. 27, 2013
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Mr Bloom:
I think your recollection of the Katz-Cohen book is mistaken.

Bridge Scandal in Houston (1978, 4th ed, 2005) was written by one author, Danny Kleinman.

I think the hand to which you refer is board 6:
AQ983 A102 64 987
where Katz overcalls 1 (as does Hamman) at unfav after:
pass, 1 ?

Mr Kleinman calls this “dangerous but consistent with his
aggressive style”. Like you, I regard 1 as 100% normal.

But Mr Kleinman (1st ed) certainly agrees with you: K-C played aggressive, good bridge and were not cheating. He compares the logs of coughs and sniffs with K-C's actions and labels them clean. He certainly does not “prove their cheating”; quite the opposite.

At the end of the 4th ed Mr Kleinman writes of his “doubts” (mostly revolving around the settlement) but ends:

“Neither Katz nor Cohen has been candid with me about the mysteries still shrouding the case. What is it they don’t want to say?

And yet … don’t the hand records and the shoddiness of the ACBL’s case still say it, that they didn’t cheat in Houston?”
Dec. 26, 2013
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Yes, I want to find out about how people hold their cards. Had I the ability to have two polls in the same article I would also have asked about observed variation in grip.

Obviously there is a link to the R-S affair but I have less interest in debating their guilt. The Oakie notes from *1960* close the case for me. Anyone who can talk their way around physical evidence like that is a few cards short of a deck, in my view.
Dec. 25, 2013
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Kelsey and Glauert (Bridge Odds For Practical Players) write at length on this.
Dec. 16, 2013
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Tricky! Don't tell anyone, otherwise it might become popular.
Dec. 10, 2013
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Mr Woolsey, could you briefly describe your new signalling agreements?
Dec. 9, 2013
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Agree with all of the above. 2
Dec. 8, 2013
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I suspect that Mr Ashton, below, is telling us what the “action” was.
Dec. 7, 2013
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Inconceivable? Reminds me of a joke of my father's…

Four Hungarian men had settled in Australia with their wives and liked to catch up for a weekly rubber bridge game. They had agreed to speak in English, to improve their skills. After one hand, there was this conversation:

North: We have bad news from the doctor today. My wife, she can have no children.

East: Ah, so she is unbearable!

South: No, she is impregnable!

West: No, no, she is inconceivable!
Dec. 7, 2013
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You beat me to it. Don't do that again!
Nov. 26, 2013
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Wow. Did the doublers not see the passed hand status?
Nov. 26, 2013
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xx xx K10xxxx xxx

With exactly 8 1/2 playing tricks, 6 is “courageous”.
Nov. 23, 2013
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