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All comments by Chris Gibson
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I learned at 7 or 8. It was a gradual process where my grandfather would have me count his high card points and whisper them in his ear, followed by being called in to “play” defensive hands that were practically yarbs, and finishing with actually getting to play more interesting hands. My brother had a similar experience. All of this was around a kitchen table, of course; I started playing duplicate when I was 24.
Dec. 28, 2011
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Brian - its a midchart treatment. I play that with my regular partner (or a version of it, anyway) in his preferred 2/1 system.
Dec. 21, 2011
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We had a lot of trouble with 2N in competitive auctions playing good/bad 2N for a bit. Then we made the meta-rule that in a competitive auction, 2N is not an offer to play unless there is no other reasonable interpretation for the bid (including good/bad 2N). I have not yet regretted making that agreement in 9 months of regular play, including both Toronto and Seattle.
Dec. 20, 2011
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Some things to keep in mind if you decide to adopt 3/low leads… I don't think the method works well with MUD leads (which is not a huge disadvantage in my mind, but whatever). You have to decide whether leading high from 3 small, or low from 3 small better fits your style. Because getting an original count in the suit led is the main reason we decided to switch to 3rd & low, we decided to lead low from 3 small in general, and to play a smith echo against suits to help clarify the position. Other people do other things, and successfully, too.

Also, you have a dicotomy between 3/5 and 3/low leaders. I play 3/low, where I lead 3rd best from an even number (4, 6, 8, whatever), and lowest from an odd number. Some people play it differently, though I'm not familiar enough with the different methods to comment intelligently on them or their comparative advantages & disadvantages.
Dec. 14, 2011
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Advantages are that it is easier to count the hand right on opening lead - using 4th best leads, you cannot easily distinguish later on whether you've led from K82 or K852, but 3/low leads you would lead the 2 from K82, and the 5 from K852, allowing you to have the choice of whether to show partner (& declarer) a 4 card suit later in the play.
Dec. 14, 2011
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Hey Joel. What did you do as a developing player that you think helped accelerate your bridge game? Where are you working to improve now?
Dec. 9, 2011
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I'm biased since I currently live in the Pacific Northwest. That being said, this was by far my favorite national that I've been to in terms of quality of playing site and the accessibility of the surrounding city. I think that not having it in a hotel actually increased my enjoyment, since there wasn't so much crappy elevator traffic to negotiate.
Dec. 6, 2011
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a heck of an accomplishment. Nice job.
Dec. 2, 2011
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allan - that sounds like a great idea.
Nov. 20, 2011
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Well, Richard, if you ever come back to Portland and want a game, let me know.

Chris Gibson
Nov. 17, 2011
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By the way, I see people making arguements for omitting Meckstroth, Hamman, et all as merely “great players” and not as influential. I disagree strongly; by being great players, their style has permeated down to even the club level. Thus, I hear about “Hamman's rule” from players playing in a 299er game, or people note how opening lighter and lighter has gained popularity without realizing Meckstroth and Rodwell's influence in showing that an active style is very dangerous. Hell, expert partnerships are playing big club systems called “Meckwell light”. That should show their pervasive influence that occurs merely from their success.
Nov. 10, 2011
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@henry - I thought about Blackwood, but Rapee not only had a ubiquitous convention that altered the game, but also was a successful international bridge player. I don't believe Blackwood's accomplishments as a player are anywhere close to Rapee's. I may be wrong, of course; Rapee was in his prime 30 years before I was born.
Nov. 5, 2011
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Eddie Kaplan too.
Nov. 4, 2011
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52 people most influencing bridge in the past 75 years, hmm… people who immediately come to mind (some in multiple categories)…

Populizers:
Charles Goren
CC Wei
Other potential entries include Warren Buffett, Frank Stewart, Alan Truscott, Omar Sharif, & Bill Gates. I have not included Ely Culbertson because his main work was before the timeline included.

Theorists:
George Rapee
Eric Kokish
Marty Bergen
Larry Cohen
Eric Rodwell
A large number of foreign players that I am not qualified to comment on

Writing:
Terrence Reese
Victor Mollo
Hugh Kelsey
Eddie Kantar
Jeff Rubens
Mike Lawrence

General Contribution
Matt Clegg
Fred Gitelman
Bobby Wolff

Players
Bob Hamman
Zia Mahmoud
Jeff Meckstroth
Paul Soloway
Nov. 4, 2011
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Hi Joe. When you are at the table at really good events, how much does table feel affect your play? Would you say that you depend on it more or less than other players? How has that developed for you over the years?
Nov. 3, 2011
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Jess - to answer your question, it just means that in the auction (1S)-2D-(2S)-?, that I will have two ways of making a call. The first is a direct bid of a suit, and the 2nd is to make a call of 2N.

The way my partner and I play it is to use 2N to show the stronger hand, letting me bid 3C, 3D, or 3H as just competitive and non-forcing, while going through 2N implies some sort of invitation, with partner bidding the suit in which he would not accept an invitational call.
Oct. 20, 2011
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In a competitive auction, we also use 2N as showing a 2nd place to play with 2 card disparity between suits. For example, in the auction
(1H)-2D-(2H)-P,
(P)-2N

the 2D bidder would usually have 6 diamonds and 4 clubs,
leaving
(1H)-2D-(2H)-P,
(P)-3C
for 5-5 or better in the minors (and somehow a hand that was not appropriate for 2N over 1H)

The same thing can apply with the auction:

1H-(1S)-P-(2S),
2N

to show 6+ hearts and a 4 card minor.

We also play good-bad 2N when in competitive situations (all 4 hands bidding & they have bid & raised a suit, either explicity or implicitly).

In fact, our meta rule is that 2N is never natural in competition unless no other logical interpretation is available for the meaning of the bid.

Oct. 18, 2011
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This is not the first time I saw this quiz. I used it to memorize the list at some point, and for a week I'd go back & play again to get my 100%. I'd say 30 of those perfectos are me from when I was trying to memorize the list. I think I retained something like 90 of them the first time I tried again today. I get bored at work.
Oct. 14, 2011
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Thank you Gavin. This was a spectacular series of videos, I feel like this was well worth every minute I spent watching these videos.
Oct. 12, 2011
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Fred, thank you for doing this today. In your own development as a player, did you read bridge books? Are there any that stand out as being particularly insightful or influential in your development?
Sept. 29, 2011
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