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All comments by Cornelia Yoder
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If you Pass, what is 4th seat supposed to do? Pass with spade support? Bid 2N to allow partner to clarify?

You'll almost certainly get a chance to bid again.

Seems to me the sane thing to do is exactly the same as you would do over something like 2(single suit) – if you don't have a good suit of your own, then wait to see what their suit is.
2 hours ago
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“Table feel” might just as well be cheating. I can't wait until we finally get electronic play and eliminate this non-bridge stupidity. It has nothing to do with the game of Bridge, only with external factors. I prefer to play Bridge, not Poker.
Sept. 19
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Is that what I should tell my beginning-intermediate bridge friends and students …. that they should be happy I psyche because they should learn how to deal with bids more advanced than Pass?

A preempt is not a psyche, it's a bid in which you have what your bid says you have. A psyche is not.

So you're entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to mine. Psyching against weaker players is abominable.
Sept. 19
Cornelia Yoder edited this comment Sept. 19
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Ya know, it's kinda strange. I've psyched occasionally, and I've been psyched many times, but I never realized how angry I was about that one incident until I started writing in this thread.

I'm sure it was because it was a world class player who didn't need to do it, who had nothing to gain, and who did it out of total disrespect for the special game and for the random stranger he was deliberately ruining the fun of playing against a world class player.

It would be like me going to a BIL tourney on BBO and psyching against the BIL players who have taken lessons from me and who had been looking forward to a chance to play against me. What a #*%&#^$* thing to do.
Sept. 18
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This is the sentence from that email that gets my attention: “Psyching against novices is not allowed.”
Sept. 18
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Stephen, of course not, psyches are legal. I'm sure he could have beat us regardless, so why would he feel the need to psyche? As for a “good story”, that's bs, he just wanted to get the highest score he could, even when it didn't matter a whit. I didn't care if I won or lost, but I did feel angry anyway. That's what psyches against weaker players do .. they cause anger and despite. No matter how good a bridge player he is, I will never respect him again as a person.
Sept. 18
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Years ago on OKbridge, there was a special game where experts were auctioned off as partners to raise money for the Turkish earthquake relief. I played with a regular partner, and one round we played against Zia and his client.

Zia psyched a 1N opening with 8 points and we played our game instead of slam.

I still remember how angry I was that someone of his skill level felt he had to psyche against an unknown random opponent, in a game that was supposed to be fun for everyone, where there was no world title, no money, no fame or glory, no masterpoints, absolutely nothing to gain by winning.

I'm feeling angry right now even writing about it.

But I got my revenge by saying privately to Zia, “Thanks. I know you are only supposed to psyche against people you can't beat honestly, so I'll take that as a very nice compliment.”
Sept. 18
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You should decide if you like the lead, accept it. If the card is one that you can trap as a penalty card, leave it on the table. If you fear the contract has been wrong-sided, accept the lead to right-side it. If you have a tenace in the suit, require the partner to lead the suit.

These are not rocket science, just do whatever gives you the best advantage.
Sept. 17
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Neal, it's a totally secret and proprietary convention that gets me to the right contract about 97% of the time. :)
Sept. 17
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I call it trump.

I once had an opponent end in a 3N contract and as the dummy put down her 9 card club suit, two of the clubs fell off the table. Her partner observed, “If a suit is too long to fit on the table, it should be trump”.
Sept. 17
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@Peg .. “highest” and “lowest” rather than “high” and “low”. I'm sure that's what you meant, but for a novice, the difference might be important.

@Phil .. I haven't heard “grok” in a lot of years! It brings back some great memories! :)
Sept. 17
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What Andy said!
Sept. 17
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Suppose you asked someone what their 2 bid means and they say “we play yoder 2”. You ask what that is, and they say, “it's yoder 2”. You ask again specifically what yoder 2 convention is and they tell you that if you want to play in an open game, you should know that already and they are not required to educate you.

Would you think them rude? Well, that's how that lady felt.
Sept. 16
Cornelia Yoder edited this comment Sept. 16
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But she IS entitled to have the full information, even if you think it's obvious.

If you say “transfer” and they ask what that is, you need to explain it fully. If you say “signoff” and they ask what that is, you need to explain it fully.

You cannot draw a line and say “here is what you are required to know and therefore I don't have to tell you”.

As ridiculous as it sounds, if they ask you what “spade” means, you need to tell them it is the pointed black symbol.


An open event is open to everyone, even a rank beginner. Patience is a virtue with new players, even if they're in an open event.
Sept. 16
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If you are playing in a weakish field, you should not say anything that either what you say or your intentions might not be clearly understood.

I occasionally claim on BBO by saying, “who has the K”, intending to claim based on whether the obvious heart finesse visible in the dummy wins or loses. I've had people accuse me of cheating for asking that. I've also had good players say, “me”, so I can do the claim.

Your “no ten?” was over the head of your opponents and even if you said it originally, as soon as she didn't answer, you should have said, “very sorry, play on”. I'm not sure I'd even turn it into a claim, since she obviously didn't understand what you were getting at.

As for explaining what udca means, full disclosure applies exactly as much as if you named an obscure convention instead of describing the bid. A simple “It means high discourages or shows an odd number, and low encourages or shows an even number, so the 2 means he likes diamonds”. What is so hard about that?


I could be wrong but my overall impression is that you are using such opportunities to show how much more you know than the opponents do, and yes, that is rude.
Sept. 16
Cornelia Yoder edited this comment Sept. 16
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I was educated by a National Level director as follows:

1. You may ask, but the opponents do not have to show.

2. You may not touch their cards, even after they leave the table.

3. You may (and should if you have reason to see them) call a director and ask them (or their permission) to see the cards.

4. The director will always check for you. The opponents cannot prevent this.
Sept. 15
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John H, of course you can, if it is your agreed system and you alert it properly.

Brad, if it is your agreed system and you both alert and explain it properly and you and your partner generally have what the explanation says, then no problem.

If it is just random nonsense because your partner can't remember your system, then yes, I'd probably ask you to go. When I'm playing bridge, I prefer if everyone else at the table is also playing bridge.
Sept. 15
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Brad, like psyches, very occasionally shouldn't be a problem. Constantly violating your system should be.

Calling them “tactical” bids is nothing but a subterfuge for bidding whatever you feel like to annoy the opponents and then claiming it's ok because it was just to annoy them.

ON BBO, I give an opponent three “tactical” bids (such as 5 HCP 5 card overcalls, 13 HCP 1N openings, and the like) and then I tell them “We prefer to play Bridge here, so please find a different table.”

It's not cheating, it just ruins the game for everyone else.
Sept. 15
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If declarer does not give everyone several seconds to think about the hand, then 3rd seat is supposed to. Period.

If you don't want to say anything, that's up to you, although I had a director called on me when it happened that I had a singleton to play and the declarer took inference from my pause and went wrong. The director simply told me to announce “thinking about the hand” so there couldn't be any issue with it.
Sept. 15
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