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All comments by Cornelia Yoder
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@Oliver: I couldn't care less about football, only about bridge. How football chooses their teams has absolutely nothing to do with bridge.
Sept. 26, 2015
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If the ratio of USA teams to other countries is 2:1, what is the ratio of total bridge player members of those same countries? Are there twice as many (or more) in the USA than in, say for example, England, Monaco, Germany, Italy, etc.?

Why should players in the USA have to compete against tens of thousands of others for a spot when players from, again for example, England only have to compete against thousands?

Shouldn't the number of teams to the World Championships be based on number of officially registered players in the country?
Sept. 26, 2015
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I think the correct quote is “Love of money is the root of all evil”. Money itself is simply a means of honest exchange of value.
Sept. 26, 2015
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LOL @ Harald, don't you know the ♦7 is called the beer card, and is good for a free beer if it is not trump and wins the last trick of the hand. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_card Maybe you have been reading too much about cheating lately to understand the humor. It's ok to lighten up a little :)
Sept. 26, 2015
Cornelia Yoder edited this comment Sept. 26, 2015
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Dave, how can an extra card at the end of a hand accomplish anything, other than maybe a free beer? :)
Sept. 26, 2015
Cornelia Yoder edited this comment Sept. 26, 2015
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of course it's a theoretical one, as I stated clearly. My point is that a whole lot of people are posting why someone cheats and so far not a single person has been able or willing to make it personal. Unless you are willing to look at it that personally, you cannot possibly have any insight into why anyone else might cheat. That's why I think Martin's whole question and list of answers is useless.
Sept. 25, 2015
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I made no assumptions, nor do I plan to guess or hypothesize (Martin already did that). I just asked the question.
Sept. 25, 2015
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That's my point, Ed, it doesn't matter if it's possible or not, nor whether you actually would or not given the chance. The question is, what would tempt you over the line?
Sept. 25, 2015
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Martin asked the wrong question, and worse, provided his own answers, making this a pretty worthless compilation of opinions.

If you want to REALLY know why people cheat, ask yourself why YOU would cheat.

Keep in mind the old story about the guy in the bar who asked a pretty woman, “Would you go to bed with me for five dollars?”
“No”, she replied.
“OK, then would you go to bed with me for one million dollars?”
“Sure”, she replied.
“How about fifty dollars?”, he asked.
“What do you think I am? A whore?”
He said, “We've already established that, now we're just negotiating the price.”

So the right question to ask about cheating is this one:

Suppose you consider yourself a truly honest person with no interest in cheating. What would it take to get you to cheat? Don't say “nothing”, because everyone has a price, and it's not always money. Think long and hard, what would be enough to make YOU try cheating?

All answers posted here should never be construed to be any admission of past, present, or future cheating, just hypothetical. What would it take to get YOU over the line?
Sept. 25, 2015
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LOL Stephen, my method is to tell them once, then when I tell them a second time, I always say, “I only tell you twice, after that I just look”. That tends to make the point :)
Sept. 25, 2015
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I already understood at an intellectual level what damage these guys did to people, but you are the first one who actually brought tears to my eyes.

Thank you for sharing such a poignant story.
Sept. 25, 2015
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Richard, I observed that in a partner of mine years ago, and informed him of it. He tried to stop doing it, just successfully enough that I was able to ignore it when playing with him. Those kind of subconscious habits are very hard to break.
Sept. 24, 2015
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… or of the sixth commandment?
Sept. 24, 2015
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Seems to me that any such ideas should be communicated to the development team asap, so they can build in guards against them.
Sept. 24, 2015
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Peg, I accept reality. I am fully aware that all kinds of body language tells are legal for the opponents to read.

Yes, I don't like it. I hate it. In MY PERSONAL OPINION it is a form of cheating. The sooner we are rid of it, the better, and the sooner people will be able to actually think about what card they want to play without (a) being “read” and (b) called for illegal hesitations. After all, bridge is a game in which you are SUPPOSED to think.

And as for lobbying, I guess I thought that was exactly what I was doing by presenting opinion and reasons why it is grossly unfair, even though presently legal.
Sept. 24, 2015
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If you like to win card games that way, then go play Poker, there is a lot more money and a lot more fame to be had there. Leave bridge for those of us who like the game, not the poker skills.
Sept. 24, 2015
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If it were truly part of the game, then it would also be fair to deliberately be deceptive with it, just exactly like falsecarding is fair.
Sept. 24, 2015
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Sure they like it. It's the people who resent being “read” that think “reading” is nothing more than a legalized way to win without having to be good at the game of bridge.
Sept. 24, 2015
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“desperate”, now there's a word I like with respect to this. If you can't win the game with bridge logic and skill, you can always get desperate enough to try reading info from the opponents. I wonder how much desperation it takes until you have to move on to even more robust measures of desperation.
Sept. 24, 2015
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“…..I worry that I am merely fidgeting until I die….”

Isn't that what we are all doing? Life is about doing something that is important to you, and it kinda doesn't matter why it is important. If you enjoy playing bridge, then why care if it is “fidgeting” or not, just do it because you enjoy it and can.
Sept. 23, 2015
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