Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Craig Biddle
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Curiously, in the final match of the second 2-day KO, a player faced a lead problem against 7 doubled. His hand was 10xx xx xx KQJ9xx and his auction was 1 on his right, 3 (favorable vul, but many of us would do it anyway), 4 on his left, 5 by partner, 6 on his right, pass, pass, 7 from partner, 7, Pass, Pass, Double.

Your lead please?

This player also ended up -2470 (tieing me for the worst lead of the tournament, as both leads cost 31 IMPs), and also won the event.

Perhaps the secret to winning KO's is to find bad leads against doubled grand slams. :)
19 hours ago
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I think he's asking whether he can announce to the table right now that he has misbid.

The answer to that, under the relevant ACBL regulations, is clearly no; the proper time to announce this is after the auction is over and before the lead is made, provided that your side declares. If your side ends up defending, then you have to keep quiet until the play is over.

I agree 100% with Mike Ma's comment above.
19 hours ago
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It's practically impossible to pick up 4 in W after the spade lead unless East has a ton of clubs. For instance, A, KQ K A and now if E has shown up with at least 8 major suit cards you can play a club to hand, likely leaving him with only one possible hand with 4. But now when you cash the Q and E shows out, W can just cover diamonds twice and the suit is blocked.
May 24
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Violating your agreements is not really a good way to play bridge. You may not like our agreement, but we have it and we both knew we had it. And if partner has a hand that can expect to make 3NT opposite void KQJxx Jxx QJ10xx then my correct call is 7 for it will be at worst on a finesse.
May 24
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I would call it idiotic. I can do that, since I led it. But 4 was explained (on inquiry) as “maybe Gerber, we don't play much together and he plays Gerber in a lot of sequences where I wouldn't.”

My hand was x J10xxx 10xx A98x. I thought it was more likely that they had had an ace-asking accident than that they had a 10-card diamond fit. It probably took me 2 minutes to lead.

Silly me. But this was in a 3-way with two survivors and we made it to the next round, and won out since I made better leads afterward.
May 24
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We sorely missed the ability for partner to splinter with his AK109xx J9x Kxx x - I would have had no problem signing off. But this hand could be cold for 7 opposite AKQxxx xx xxx Ax. I felt that I had to bid something with controls and tricks.

In retrospect, I think 5 is best. With the dream hand, partner will surely bid 6 over that. And with his actual hand, we would surely make 12 tricks whether partner bid or passed since either auction would have made a passive trump lead likely, and it would have been a no-brainer to drop the Q doubleton behind.

But I bid RKC, and the 5 response got doubled. Down 2 in 5. That was actually a blessing, since my teammate found the lead unaided against the same auction where my hand passed the 4 rebid.
May 24
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East had no business bidding 3NT with only one likely stopper and needing two high diamond honors from partner.
May 23
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Declarer went down in this against me by trying to set up clubs. I was East and had J73 QJ4 Q108643 9. They ruffed a club middle at trick 2 and I pitched a heart.

I just thought this was an interesting sort of dummy reversal.
May 22
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Probably never as spectacularly as Joe Grue did.
May 22
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If you have that hand, and partner balances with (or simply makes) a takeout double, you're supposed to cue-bid to make sure partner has 4 cards in the unbid major. If you restrict yourself to ONLY doubling with 4 cards in the unbid major, you're taking away opportunity to compete.
May 21
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The whole point of the 90/10 is to provide incentive for players to bid and play in tempo. It works. If Cheek wants to protect himself, playing with screens, he should write a note to his screenmate as soon as he realizes he has shown the wrong number of key cards. Then, he can think as long as he wants to try to catch up.

It's a lot tougher without screens. But that's OK, too, since events played without screens are usually larger and therefore more sensitive to delays caused by slow play.
May 19
Craig Biddle edited this comment May 19
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I had the great good fortune to be able to thank Zia for this in person the other day. He of course didn't know me from a cab driver, but he was very gracious and insisted that Mariusz had made the greater gesture.
May 19
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The lead and play to the first trick was identical where Greco played 7, and Bertens pitched a club on the 2nd round of spades, but Greco went down anyway. So maybe the inference about 5-2 clubs wasn't that strong.

All 6 opening leaders against 7 chose the J. All 6 opening leaders pitched a club on the 2nd round of spades. Three defenders (Platnick, Silverstein, and Fleisher) did not unblock the Q at trick 1, all declarers at their tables went down. The other three defenders (Zia, Cheek, and Koneru) all unblocked, but only Miller believed the defense and made 7.
May 16
Craig Biddle edited this comment May 16
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The director apparently rolled the auction back to 6, this giving Fleisher 11 IMPs on the board and 226 for the match.
May 15
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The auction was:
CC HB
1 2
3 3
4 4NT
5 5
6 6
7NT

West held AQ875 95 Q AKQJ9, East K92 A2 AKJ43 842

South was dealer, West opened 1 and East forced to game with 2. West bid 3 and East supported with 3. West cue-bid 4, and East bid RKC. West showed 0/3, and Bertens went into the tank since his hand was K9x Ax AKJxx xxx. 3 key cards was obviously impossible, and 0 left partner with QJxxx KQ Q KQJxx at best, which seems like an unlikely hand for his auction.

But unlikely and impossible are two different things. East dutifully signed off in 5. West now bid 6 and East 6. Now West bid 7NT. It seems logical for him to have concluded at some point that he was facing 3 key cards, since with 2 East would have asked for the trump Q and with fewer it would be tough for East to have his bids. But I'm sure tempo was a factor.
May 15
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Exactly. I think this hand should make one slam try and partner, who stretched to bid 3, will surely sign off. My hand is much better if partner has KQxx Jx Qx AK10xx, although slam is still not wonderful. But make either of his red suits Kx and slam is very good opposite the 2nd hand and fair opposite the hand he held.
May 15
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Our minimum opening bid is frightfully low. And it IS 15 HCP after all. But it's a classic hand for “in and out valuation.” Of course you and I are two of the few people who know what that is any more.
May 15
Craig Biddle edited this comment May 15
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There's not much you can do when overbidding opponents catch a perfecto. But it's telling that North at the other table made a slam try opposite 3 and this North didn't make a move over 4.
May 15
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I'm with the majority here, I think I should have bid 4. Partner's hand was AKQx J9 Qx K9xxx and he would have subsided in 4.
May 14
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Sorry, NS had the hearts. The dealer was N.
May 14
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