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All comments by Craig Biddle
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If declarer had called the K, he would not have waited 5 seconds or so he would have repeated it. As others it sounds like “kyou” to me, which is a lot closer to “thank you” than to “King”. (It might well have been “go up” or just “up”, come to think of it.)
14 hours ago
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Or the cone of abominable customer service, which the ACBL has become quite adept at using over the many years I have been a member.
June 23
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Yes, inadvertent doubles like this one are really savagely punished by the Laws. IN my 299er game a few weeks ago, the biding started Pass-Double. 2nd hand wanted to show an opening hand with no good suit!
June 22
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1-1, 3 as a weak jump shift?
June 21
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Yes, Mike but playing a to the Q early enables you to pick up all K onside layouts, while postponing the finesse until trick 7 forces you to guess the J - if S has it, your line works but if N has it you have to play a to the 10 since otherwise when you duck a N can drive out the A before you have squeezed him.

The early finesse, far from being a mistake, changes the timing of the squeeze so that S has to reveal his original holding or unguard hearts in order to keep his K10.
June 21
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Or, in the case of a spade lead and six rounds of clubs as Mike Kopera suggested, S must keep as many hearts as dummy in the 6-card ending, along with the K10 and the J. For if he doesn't, the dreaded red suit squeeze on N reappears after declarer ducks a heart.
June 21
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Wasn't dummy's first shown suit hearts? I wouldn't count raising opener as showing a suit.
June 21
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Buy and read “All 52 Cards” by Marshall Miles. Then read it again. It's in its umpteenth printing, and the bidding is pretty antiquated, since it is over 50 years old.
June 21
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Paul is right. The 4-card ending after a spade lead is W A7 ? 7 and E xx A10 with W on lead.

N must save 2 and 2 S must save 2 and the J, so only 1. But if S can beat W's heart, then N can unblock hearts on the A to prevent the establishment of one of dummy's hearts, since S will have a winner to cash after W cashes the A and ducks a heart. As Dave says, the ending that results from the diagram is probably a Compound Guard Squeeze without the count.

And on a heart lead and continuation the 4 card ending with W to lead is W A7 x x and E J x A10.

N must save a heart and Kx, he has an idle card. S, though, must save K10 J and a heart winner. So W cashes a club and pitches a from dummy. S must yield something, a spade pitch is obviously fatal. A heart pitch allows a simple red suit squeeze on N and pitching the J just allows a diamond finesse at trick 12. This is a classic double guard squeeze.
June 21
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Here in Pittsburgh we try to seed all the club games. It doesn't always work because of all the mobility challenged people - I ran our STAC game at the Unit game last week and there was only one flight A pair (average > 2500 MP) EW and the NS field was nearly all flight A.

Oddly (or maybe not, due to the advanced ages of some of these Flight A payers), the top two scores overall were NS.
June 18
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http://www.math.northwestern.edu/~xia/precision.bid

This may help. It appears to be an outline of the Goren book and the Dettman book.
June 18
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Yes, the director's ruling is clearly cause for concern. One needs more than a single instance to be able to call this a “frequent” light response. And it is a very common thing for less experienced players to bid something (anything!) rather than put down a stiff trump in dummy. I saw a player the other day respond 1NT to 1 and then bid 3 over partner's 2 rebid with xx Kxxx xx QJ8xx. This didn't go well, as you might expect.
June 18
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Yeah, doesn't E have an easy 2NT bid over 2? Spade length and a stopper, fitting heart honor, cards in both minors. Passing is basically telling partner that their bidding can't be trusted. If that is truly the case, there are other partners.
June 18
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I would word it “with 6+ HCP you MUST respond.” That makes it easier to start the discussion about when you should respond with less.
June 18
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Sorry, I switched back to my actual seat in my comment. I was E here and over my 5 bid my LHO just up and bid 6.

This is beyond bad in my opinion, for several reasons. First of all, there's no reason to believe that partner has any first round control for the 5 bid. Second, there's no reason to believe they have club support. (Suppose they held x AKQxxx Jxxx xx. Are they really supposed to bid over 6?) And third, pass here just has to be forcing - they preempted, partner bid a game, they took a push, and I have doubt about strain with extra values. I think I need a top heart honor in addition to all my other goodies to bid 6 here. Partner's 5 bid was pressured, and doesn't have to have full values if their suit is good enough.
June 18
Craig Biddle edited this comment June 18
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Agreed, Michael. We did, in fact, bid and make game. And game was terrific. Assuming that I could hold KQ10xx of trump opposite 4 small to one loser, all I needed was 3-2 or one of the Q, J, or 10 singleton. 3 of the 4 pairs that stopped in a partial made 5, I suspect because the defense tried too hard to beat 3 (clubs were 3-2).

I posted this hand more to find out how often BW readers would wimp out on game, given that 4 of the other 12 pairs who faced this problem missed game. I am sure that the standard of people here is far better than in out STaC field with dinner included. But I don't think that stopping in 3 in a standard limit raise auction is the worst decision in the world, especially for lower flight players.
June 18
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Just QJx. But he made up for it with Ax and K. I cheated a little on the problem conditions - we play 1M-2N as lim+, and over partner's 2NT I bid 3 to announce that I would have passed a LR. My reasoning was that (a) the trump Q is often wasted in a 9-card fit, and (b) partner's average HCP in spades rated to be close to 4. Unless his 4 points in spades was the ace, I was committing to game opposite a single raise.

I did pass reasonably quickly, but partner went on anyway with help in all 3 side suits, hoping I could deal with trumps opposite his 9 high. I could. But note that we would have had no play if I had been 2=5=3=3, let alone 3=5=2=3. And even then, we were vulnerable to a possible defensive club ruff since we were off the A.

I think this is one of those hands where it's reasonable (or perhaps, not unreasonable) to miss game at matchpoints but not at IMPs (especially vul at IMPs).
June 18
Craig Biddle edited this comment June 18
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What was unclear about “6♣. It made”? See the hand below, with 0-7-3-3 pattern for why. And partner's actual hand was even worse, void KQJ10xx Jxx Q10xx. But the K was on, so it still made.
June 18
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I am surprised at the overwhelming vote to reverse into a weedy 4-card minor here opposite a passed hand. It was the winner, though, as partner had Qxx J9xx KJ10xx x. 6 was laydown (reached by two pairs only in 13 results). We got quite a good score for +690.
June 18
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Can you? What if partner has x KQJ10xxx xx KQx? Slam made because partner was, curiously, void in spades.
June 18
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