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All comments by Damian Hassan
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The Cornell Critical Thinking Tests might be suitable for your task. They can be administered from age 10 onwards.
April 17
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Not 100% Florian - East might have a singleton or void diamond, which I reckon at about 12% given the spade break. But still pretty good odds, and nearly 10% better than line B.
April 3
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Line 1 is the better line.

Christopher is wrong about the hands where RHO has a singleton heart. He's right if declarer fails to notice that RHO discards on the first heart ruff, but an alert declarer will ruff a diamond back to hand after winning the A in dummy (so Line 1 as stated is incomplete). So if we know RHO has a singleton heart then line 1 is definitely better, gaining against a 5125 or 5152 distribution with East (in the latter case, you see West discard on the K so can safely ruff two diamonds back to hand.)

Line 1 seems to lose if East started with a 5242 shape, as now East can discard a club on the second heart ruff, and can ruff the K. But in that case, East's last three cards are a trump and two diamonds, so dummy's J must win a trick.
April 3
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In one partnership, we invert the 2NT and 2 rebids, with 2 showing a 17-19 balanced hand (we play 14-16 NT). Responder bids 2 with an invitational hand, and 2 and 2NT are puppet relays, either to play or to show various minor suit hand types.
March 12
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Sarah, you know full well that the declarer in your slow played hand did not say that he was playing slowly to confound the opposition. Indeed, I believe you apologized for that misrepresentation at the time.
Dec. 12, 2018
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Queen Margaret laments a costly revoke in Henry VI, Part II: “A heart it was, bound in with diamonds.”

Shylock also has cause to regret a careless discard: “Why there, there, there! A diamond gone cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfort (sic).”

Junior bidding seems to cause some squabbles. Florizel and Perdita in a Winter’s Tale are obviously ashamed of their bidding: “Come, come, he must not mark our contract”, and “The heaven sets spies upon us, and will not have our contract celebrated.” Juliet complains to Romeo, “Although I joy in thee, I have no joy in this contract to-night: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.”

Good declarer play does have its reward. Claudio in Measure for Measure boasts, “Thus stands it with me; upon a true contract I got possession of Julietta’s bed.”
July 31, 2018
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Apologies, Lilias. An autocorrect error, but my fault for not noticing.
Peter's source is a blog that only ran for a few months. There are a few red flags for fact checkers: it misspells stature instead of statute; it talks about British stature, when UK law generally distinguishes between England and Wales, and Scotland; and it categorizes by IQ, which is not something you would expect in legal definitions.

I went back to original sources, as far as possible. The
1913 Mental Deficiency Act www.educationengland.org.uk/documents/acts/1913-mental-deficiency-act.pdf defines idiot and imbecile in functional terms. This act was repealed by the 1959 Mental Health Act www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/7-8/72 . Idiot as a legal term is cited in the OED going back to 1590, and the earliest mention of imbecile in English law that I can find us the 1867 poor act.
The classification by IQ dates from early 20th century US psychiatry texts, and continued up to ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases). This was superseded by ICD-10 in 1990.
July 28, 2018
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Liliana, I too would have been shocked if these were legal terms in 2005. Peter's post illustrates another problem with quoting from the internet - it is often wrong. Idiot was a legal term from the middle ages, and imbecile became a legal term in England and Wales from the mid 1800s. Both terms were abolished in 1959. Moron, as David Burn has already stated, was a word coined by Goddard in 1910, and has never been part of UK law.
July 28, 2018
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There's a reference to the coroner's report in the Independent (Elizabeth City, NC) of August 30th, 1929.
https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025812/1929-08-30/ed-1/seq-3/
See the top of the page. The coroner, S.A.Nathan, believed the death to be an accident, and that Harry thought he was pulling the trigger on one of two empty chambers.

The Watauga Democrat of Sept 12th 1929 has a paragraph about the funeral: http://newspapers.digitalnc.org/lccn/sn82007642/1929-09-12/ed-1/seq-3/

The same newspaper, a fortnight earlier, had the rather unsympathetic heading: “He kept his word.”
http://newspapers.digitalnc.org/lccn/sn82007642/1929-08-29/ed-1/seq-1/ (bottom right of page)
March 20, 2018
Damian Hassan edited this comment March 21, 2018
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That looks right.
The description of the game in this article http://wickedchopspoker.com/simpleton-country-folk-hog-wild-for-pig/ matches Pedro.
I can't find a working link to the rules of Pig, although there is a fleeting glance at them in this video. https://youtu.be/Wusjo45UMTo
Feb. 28, 2018
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If you think that a defender with QT would always ruff low first, but with QJ or JT would choose at random, then your strategy with QJT should match that. Your first two cards will be the T,Q 1/3 of the time, and the four QJ or JT permutations 1/6 of the time each. That way, when declarer sees you follow with the T then Q, he has to choose between your playing this 100% of the time with QT doubleton and 1/3 of the QJT. Similarly, if you play T then J, this could be 1/2 of the JTs, or 1/6 of the QJTs. In each case, the restricted choice calculation reduces the chances of the QJT by three.
Feb. 28, 2018
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Yes, Richard and Kenton have convinced me that I was wrong, and the overall evidence points to a 7222 shape and dropping the SJ.
Feb. 27, 2018
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Vacant spaces (7 v 12) gives odds of 3.85% for initial QJT,1.54% for QT. Divide QJT by 3 for restricted choice, so it's about 55% for the finesse now.
Feb. 25, 2018
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I certainly would not have seen the necessity of winning with the Q and not the A at trick 1.As David says, a lovely problem.
May 2, 2016
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There is a real danger of being stranded in dummy in this hand. You need to keep the KS as a possible entry. Win in dummy with the Q, then lead a club. If East (with something like Jxxx, xx, KQx, AKxx) returns a spade, you can win in hand and establish the QC. Alternatively, if the defense tries to draw trumps, you continue clubs, and your KS and AS in dummy allow enough flexibility in your entries to decide where you win the third round of spades.
May 1, 2016
Damian Hassan edited this comment May 1, 2016
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