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All comments by Dan Putnam
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After the Q lead and AK in dummy, there is no need to show attitude. The 2 should be suit preference. Therefore, clubs.
Aug. 21
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Agreed, and pummeling someone with a bridgemate is only slightly worse than an angry post mortem.
Aug. 19
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I like the 3NT much more in matchpoints. I assume this was IMPS.
Aug. 19
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On the last board, he might have led the Q if you had bid 1 instead of 2. What was that all about anyway?
Aug. 19
Dan Putnam edited this comment Aug. 19
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The only time I find that my bridgemates hold data after a game and server is turned off, is when we end a game early. We hold a non-sanctioned game where players want to leave before 8:30 pm, so we may have to change last round from 9 to 8 or whatever. When we then start a new game, the bridgemates want to finish that last game, so I have to reset them, which I do at the tables.
Aug. 17
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Based on my experience at local clubs, sanctioned games have these advantages:

1) You get to play against players from nearby towns, and not just your neighbors.
2) You can overcall with 8 points without hearing the term “handhog”.
3) Auctions seldom end at 2. It's not much fun defending 2 making 6.
4) Postmortem discussions are more interesting than merely a recitation of how many points everyone had.
5) Results are posted with contracts if not hand records.
6) There is a much wider variety of bidding styles which make you use more judgment.
7) Card counting is not cause for banishment.
8) You can see your improvement by how often you scratch and which pairs you beat.
9) You sometimes get great lessons. Good bridge players are like good cooks. They all have a million secrets for success and they share them with anyone who will listen.
10) After playing in sanctioned games, you can go to tournaments and test your mettle against pros once in a while. You can even beat them once in a while in a short set by doing everything against the odds.

But a lot of it depends on how much you like the game vs casual conversation with old friends.
Aug. 12
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Before the auction begins, hcp are a good way to measure your relative strength. Same with short NT auctions, such as 1NT-3NT. My biggest pet peeve is automatically adding points for length or shortness without a likely fit, though long suits are more likely to find fits.

A fifth card in a weak suit is worth a lot less than in a good suit unless it becomes trump. If you have a fit, the 5th trump is worth a whole trick and even adds value to the 4th. Meanwhile, shortness is only valuable if it either gives you likely ruffs or eliminates losers. I cringe when one side finds a 9-card fit and the opponents each add value for their doubletons.

While this can be too complicated for beginners, I think you can teach very early that once you have a fit, you count tricks. Part of the advantage of doing this is they start to envision how the hand may play.
Aug. 11
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“Really?” is pretty flagrant, especially in a tournament.
Aug. 5
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Wayne, you can only say “11-15 hcp, etc.” if you have that agreement. My partners may very well have a 5=2=1=5 with 10 hcp or fewer with a 6-5. They may also have 20+ hcp and an unbalanced hand. I don't tend to ask infrequent partners whether they use the rule of 20, or open 2 with two-suiters. The only agreement is that 2 is game forcing and we are looking for our best strain. With an experienced partnership I will learn quirks and tendencies, which should be disclosed, but I don't expect an experienced opponent to want a primer on undiscussed understandings.
Aug. 5
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A second suit is generally 4+ cards. Isn't that pretty standard? If the pair has never heard of treating the 3 as showing extra values in a game force situation, why would they think to offer a range? It promises opener still has an opening hand? Only 56 of over 600 voters in the Bridge Winners survey require “significant extras” for the bid. Apparently it's not that common, and I'd be curious how many partnerships have discussed the meaning of “modest extras.”
Aug. 4
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On a Dec 25, 2017 survey by Larry Cohen and Bridge Winners, 347 voters said that the 3 bid in this sequence promised “at least modest extras,” with only 56 of these requiring “significant extras or full reversing values.” Meanwhile, 256 said it could be a dead minimum.

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/bw-21-openers-high-reverse/

In the August Bridge Bulletin, Cohen says in an article for newer players that “reverses only apply after a one-level response.” He is assuming 2/1 GF, by the way.

I don't know if it is regional or level of expertise, but I would guess that a large majority of players I compete with (mostly clubs) have never heard of treating the 3 as showing extra values. When asked, they would reply “second suit” and wonder if the asker thinks all club bids are artificial.
Aug. 4
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I believe Mike Lawrence advises to overcall a weak two as if partner has 7-8 points and minimal support for your suit. I have nothing more that that.
Aug. 3
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The author of the example worded it poorly, but I think he intended it to mean that opener responds to the 2NT as if their actual agreement was weak twos.
Aug. 3
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As West, I interpret 5 as “I'm not worried about aces.” OK, 6.
July 30
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“At both tables West showed values in the Auction by either XX at my table or 2d showing 11-17 and 4h and 5 or more spades.”

But in both cases, this hand passed after the 1 opening bid? How can the 2 promise a powerhouse, and how does someone get fooled by it? Was it alerted and explained as both majors, 11-17?
July 30
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Great story. Would have been better seeing the hands though.
July 30
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“Get a life” seems rude. So I picked “other”, but there was definitely an eye roll.
July 29
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E/W did their very best to not wake up. What did East think the 4 meant? 6 spades and 5 diamonds? No adjustment here.
July 29
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When in Rome, don't rock the boat. Or is that Venice?
July 23
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I also very much enjoyed the session I watched from the European Youth games.
July 22
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