Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Dave Feldman
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I'm pulling for you!
Aug. 18, 2017
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Here's hoping tomorrow isn't Thrombosis Thursday! Enjoying your posts immensely.
Aug. 16, 2017
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When possible, it's always nice to be able to describe 13 of your cards with one bid. :-)
Aug. 13, 2017
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My first club game was a tad intimidating for two high school students. We sat east-west and when we made it to table one, a guy named Charlie Goren was playing north. Westwood Bridge Club.
Aug. 13, 2017
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What an unusual ATB problem! I'm not sure I agree with any of the four bids by NS, but I also voted for neither of them doing anything terrible.
July 29, 2017
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The rooms vary dramatically at the Royal York. Have you asked for a room change?
July 24, 2017
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I so agree with Michael on this. If you have 3 raises, the opps deserve to know what 2S means. After all, YOU think it is important to make these strength distinctions – why shouldn't the opponents be privy to the information during a live sequence.
July 15, 2017
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If 2N is decent hand with trump support, what do you bid with with a decent hand without trump support but not a suit or strength (or both) to make a positive in your best suit?

We've found that auctions that start with 2X (acol) - ranking (negative or waiting 2N – fouor or more cards in that ranking suit usually put us ahead of the field, especially with very strong hands.
July 14, 2017
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Shireen, if you (or anyone else) has the time or inclination, I'd love to know how you can handle the “waiting” hands if ranking bid promises a weak hand.
July 13, 2017
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I'm not sure Acol 2-bids are playable unless the ranking bid is negative OR waiting, for many of the same reasons 2-2 as weak-only is tough.
July 12, 2017
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We play that new suits are forcing, so 2-2 (neg. or waiting) 3 is forcing for one round. At least you've shown nine cards in two suits in a way that standard cannot (e.g., 2-2
3-? Even simple strong club systems with 2-suiters with longer diamonds are not so easy to stay low.
July 11, 2017
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I love Acol 2-bids and play them with two partners. We mostly play the same as above, with a few significant differences. We have loosened the requirements for a positive single raise (a first-round control is no longer required) and we would definitely open most 5-loser hands in the majors. In fact, auctions like 2S-2N (negative or waiting) 3S specifically show a 5-loser hand and is obviously not forcing. We would usually have more HCP's, but we might bid this way with your sample hand, AKQJ654 Ax 32 32

As David indicates, Acol 2's are great for 2-suiters, and it allows you to bid other hands that are difficult in standard. For example, we don't need the auction of 2C-2D 2S to show 5 spades, so we use it to show 4 cards in the major with longer clubs (the one 2-level suit bid that is not an Acol 2). We also don't need a jump bid by a 2C opener, so we use 2C-2D (negative or waiting) 3D/3H/3S/4C to show shortness in that suit and at least four cards in all the other suits (we need 2C-2D 3C to show long clubs).

I think your set requirements for positive responses might help with some slam bidding, but our cruder methods, especially eschewing the need for lots of defense in opener's hand) get us to many games that the field doesn't seem to reach.
July 10, 2017
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A big way-to-go for the whole Kokish team, but a special nod to Fred and Eric. You are an inspiration to part-timers!
July 7, 2017
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How about calling the director if you aren't sure about your ethical obligations?
July 5, 2017
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Just to be clear, if I'm playing negative free bids, I always alert takeout doubles.
July 5, 2017
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I prefer the EBU's approach to the ACBL's, but I guess at this point a sufficient number of pairs play a double with values and no shortness in opener's suit that an “off-shape” takeout double doesn't feel alertable in ACBL-land. With the added baggage of pairs using equal-level conversion and negative free bids, a takeout double is a virtual self-alert in today's game. That's the only reason I voted “no” on the poll. Of course, there should be full disclosure when opponents ask about your style.
July 5, 2017
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While reading all the comments, my mind wandered to last week, when I was kibitzing the finals of the USA-2 trials. In the grueling final, I watched Joe Grue, Brad Moss, Geoff Hampson, and, to a lesser extent Eric Greco, busting each other's chops, making fun of their own mistakes, playfully needling the opponents , and in general, acting like friends. As the Vu-Graph operator described it, there was respectful silence when a player went into the tank. Of course, these four have played against each other many times, and played on teams together, and I assume they wouldn't act the same way with opponents who they knew would not welcome the running commentary.

They all desperately wanted to win to get to the world championships, and yet they seemed to be having more fun and resorting to fewer legalisms than in a typical 4th bracket of a regional Swiss. Yes, silence at the bridge table probably is prudent, but if some of the best players in the world, playing in the most important event in their country can have some fun and avoid being offended, can't the rest of us?
May 17, 2017
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Jan Martel for President – of anything!
May 12, 2017
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Nicely done!
May 10, 2017
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