Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Burch
1 2 3
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Perhaps West should have led the King for count.
Oct. 11
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Me, too, but we play 2 as a negative free bid. So it is that or 3 fit-jump. I'd choose the fit-jump.
Oct. 11
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Duck - like Skid Simon says.
Aug. 25
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Fit non-jump… Club suit and Diamond support to help partner decide what to do over 3.
Aug. 17
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Maybe he was trying to send a friend request to your son and got confused. We 70 year olds (OK, I'm only 69) do, you know.
Aug. 10
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This happened to me last night!

As dealer, I held 5 763 AKQ10 K10765 - and I didn't know what to do. The Clubs did not look rebidable, and I decided to pass as someone was bound to open a major, and I could join in later. In the event, partner opened 1NT, and I raised to 3NT to much amusement around the table. Our oponents cashed the first 5 Spade tricks and conceded the rest: 1 down for an unassailable bottom.

I have a “Next Time” notebook. It contains a new entry, open 1 on weak 1-3-4-5 hands with the points concentrated in the minors.
July 31
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The other David B.'s numbers are spot on, of course, but what can be calculated at the table?

Let's assume that North has 10 red cards as David says, but that the absence of a Lightner Double precludes a Spade void. Therefore North holds either a Singleton J or Doubleton Club.

After allocating the 1 Club to North and the 3 Clubs to South that they must hold for the possible 1=4 and 2=3 splits, the probability ratio of these holdings is calculated as:

Remaining Vacant Places/Cards Held when the last one is allocated to each hand in turn.

In this case, North and South started with 3 and 6 Vacant places.
After allocating 1 Club to North and 3 Clubs to South, North will have 2 Remaining Vacant Places and South will have 3 Remaining Vacant Places for the final Club, and North will hold 2 Clubs for 2=3; and South will hold 4 Clubs for 1=4.

So the ratio of the probabilities of 2=3 to 1=4 is 2/2 to 3/4 or 4 to 3 in favour of North starting with a Doubleton.

If you wish to check, the ratio of 9.52% to 7.14%, given by David above, are prescisely in the ratio 4 to 3.

Following David's logic in halving the probability of the Doubleton (but ignoring the 3=2 split as improbable), the odds switch to 3 to 2 in favour of the second round finesse.
July 27
David Burch edited this comment July 27
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Thinking of the Comparable Call as the Yoke in the Egg of the Withdrawn Call, both a 6-9 1NT response and a 2-level limit raise are clearly Comparable Calls to a Withdrawn Pass.
July 6
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Whoever wrote the laws does not understand set theory, and used a word of which they did not know the meaning.
July 1
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AH, or rather ARGHH! It's my fault, I have muddled Length and Strength too. Thank you David for allowing this penny to gently drop.

Unfortunately I seem to unable to edit and corrected the original.

With apologies to all, especially Ron Klinger.
June 19
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No David, I should have said “number tricks required for the contract” instead of “the level of contract” - but I'm sure you knew that!

Should I edit the original?
June 18
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Thank you both for the clarifications, Daniel and Ronald, which are very useful for me.
June 18
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In Ron Klinger's “100 Winning Bridge Tips” he presents three criteria required for a penalty double below game level:
a) 20+ points on your side
b) Length in the trump suit: Rule of 10 (Level of contract + expected trump winners >=10)
c) Strength in the trump suit: Rule of 12 (Level of contract + trump winners >=12)

- with all three needed to be present.
June 17
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Hi Daniel, I'm not sure I understand your question. After partner's competitive 3♠, there is no invite.
June 16
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“3♠: Invitational. If partner just wanted to compete to 3♠, he would double. That would not be a responsive double. It would be a puppet to 3♥, after which he would bid 3♠ to show that he was just competing as opposed to having game interest.”

Dare I say this? I play this the other way round: direct 3♠ is competitive, double followed by a bid shows invitational values. How wrong am I, and why?
June 15
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The French call dummy “Le Mort” - and with reason: he/she should be dead quiet (except to prevent an irregularity).
June 8
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I always enjoy reading Kit's Korner with the step by step analysis and insight into correct ways of thinking. It must be quite an effort to put it together.

Thank you, Kit.
June 8
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I agree… a winning bid in my view, and I might get to mention the Spades if either: partner inquires about strength; or opponents overcall Hearts.
June 5
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I play weak 2s in all four suits. So, no problem - a standard weak 2 opener for me.

When I play outside events, our opponent's often ask “What's your strong bid?” to which I normally reply, “We don't hold strong hands.” - which is true 99% of the time. The other 1%, we just open at the 1-level and catch-up. And, anyway, a very strong hand doesn't seem to play well opposite a very weak one - especially when I am declarer.
June 4
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LHO has on average 16 HCP (accurately it's 15.79, so 16 is a good enough approximation). You have 7 HCP, leaving 17 for partner and RHO. Assuming RHO would bid with 9-17, partner has 8-17. This will be weighted to the lower end, so I would guess partner has 10-11 and RHO has 6-7 … on average.
May 11
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