Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Caprera
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With all respect, you got all the matchpoints because 5H was a REALLY BIG BID opposite a simple raise that rejected a game try. The issue isn't, “What is 5H?”, rather, “What is my hand worth?”

Next time, partner will hold,
QJx, KQxx, KQx, Jxxx
(a game accept), and 6 level would have a flaw.
Aug. 19
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There is no need to duck a heart early. On a spade lead, come down to four cards. Your expert rubber bridge LHO has to throw away a top heart as declarer runs the minors, and your RHO has to go in with HJ from Jx. If they find that defense regularly, I am cutting into a different game.
Aug. 19
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Some months ago Spencer Hurd posted a rule of thumb credited to his son John, "When we don't have a preempt, we don't preempt. Sound advice and applicable here.
Aug. 17
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For me, 2S is not forcing and a no-brainer.
Aug. 17
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Richard's suggestion that 3S-(P)-5S is asking about trump quality surprised me. I would guess most play some form of “baby keycard” (0-1-1w-2-2w). Admittedly you cannot find the jack, but it can avoid the five level when the preempt was not based on a good suit. His example is a vulnerable 3S preempt which tends to be decent but his rule would appear to cover a favorable first chair weak two bid. Preempting style these days isn't what it used to be.

On a frequency basis, I would hazard the guess that further preemption is much more likely than looking for slam. Again, that may be dependent on how frisky one preempts.

As for Richard's preempts, don't let his mild manner fool you. In a national pairs event he blew me out of the water preempting on KQJx (yes, fourth. He was white third chair.)
Aug. 17
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You asked what my auction would have been.

2D (precision ~4414) - 2N (relay)
3C (min) - 3D (relay)
3H (4=3=1=5) - 4N (Mulberry, KCB in spades)
5D (1 or 4) - 6S

Are you sorry you asked?
Aug. 17
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Put me down for fitting.
Aug. 14
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Obviously, the North hand is not looking to bid slam, rather it is trying to prevent East-West from doing so. I was merely attempting to observe that an agreement to use 4N as KCB (rather than 4S) comes with a hidden cost of making such a bid less attractive.

While we are on the subject, I question what the proper spelling is for a bid designed to mislead one's opponents. I spelled it “psyche” which is clearly wrong, being a two syllable word referring to the human soul and spirit. However, “psych” meaning “to prepare for a task”, or alternatively, short for psychiatric or psychedelic, would also appear to be inappropriate. Michael used the term “psychic” which is commonly defined in terms relating to supernatural, telepathic or clairvoyant powers. That doesn't do it for me either.

I wonder whether one of the bridge historians who frequent this site could enlighten us.
Aug. 14
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The long running debate as to whether 4H-4S should be natural. If it is Keycard, then it is a safe psyche, but 4H-4N may lead to a bad result if opener has “two with”.
Aug. 14
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I am having trouble imagining what agreement you would like to have. If the heart suit is known, then most partnerships would default to suit preference. Declarer's decision with respect to the diamond penalty card may resolve partner's preference regarding diamonds. So, your left with little information to convey. Perhaps you could give a Vinje triple odd, triple even signal, or ask a question of partner, “How about pizza after the session?” I would think it would be permitted to have an agreement that, “If attitude, count and suit preference are all known, our carding relates to how strongly we desire to eat pizza.” Whether it is upside down or right side up should probably be consistent with the partnership's other carding agreements.
Aug. 13
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Why is this a psychic bid? Fundamentally, it asks “Do you have a four card major?” I describe it as “Staymanesque.” It does not promise values. For example, responder might be 5-5 in the majors and wants to know if he should dive. It could be the same bad hand that bids 1N-2C.
Aug. 13
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Other. Card showing in context with a willingness to defend and no better bid available.
Aug. 10
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Thank you. And sorry Han for misspelling your name.
Aug. 9
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I agree that this is a nice piece of writing and I look forward to more, but, as someone who lives in the Wild West, can wake up to cattle looking into his kitchen window, has attended rodeos, and owns a couple of pistols (just for plunking varmints and tin cans), I would like to question the implications of a statement that Hans makes. Hans said, “When West is known to hold 3 spades and 2 small clubs, while East is known to hold 6 spades and 1 small club, lefty has 8 cards left and righty only 6. The odds for playing West for the queen of clubs are therefore 8 against 6.”

Is that mathematically correct (putting aside Hans' derision of mathematicians)? I thought that if declarer had 9 trump missing the queen and there was a one card known difference in a side suit, that the finesse and the drop were equally likely.

I would appreciate someone putting me straight on this.
Aug. 9
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Who said anything about a disagreement? I was playing with my wife. How could we possibly disagree? Yes, she thought it was a diamond control, I thought it was just “I have extra's.” We survived and the board was a push.
Aug. 7
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So, I bounced this hand off Eddie Wold between sessions today. He believes 4D is a diamond control because responder's 3H bid is supposed to be “pure.” Could responder be QJTxxx and AKQxx? Perhaps, but don't play for it.
Aug. 6
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DBL is penalty. A trap of 1D. It is also nuts. If it worked I would roll it back. I would consider a procedural penalty.
Aug. 5
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“When an auction is competitive, you have to show your suits.” TGBH
Aug. 4
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One year my wife ran the Lincoln marathon when it was 80 degrees and 80% humidity. She finished the race on a day when finishing was winning, but physical exertion does affect one's mental processes. Our kids were little and we had signs we had made up as we followed her around the course. “Go mom”, “you can do it”, and my sign for mile 20, “what is the cube root of 64?”

Of the hundreds of runners who ran by, I would say 70% offered no response, 25% said “8” or “I used to know this”, and perhaps 5% answered “4”, the correct response.

But my favorite was a guy who said “8”, ran 100 yards, turned around, ran 100 yards back, said “4”, then went on to the finish. He could be a bridge player.
Aug. 4
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2S is the bid that set the trolley off the track.
Aug. 4
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