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All comments by David Caprera
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I would like to be playing transfers here so that I could show a good 2H bid.
an hour ago
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I wrote to East and confirmed that their partnership agreement is to lead the 3 from both T73 and T753 in the middle of the hand.
2 hours ago
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Sorry. Corrected.
4 hours ago
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I limited it to two tricks for a reason. One option was win the CQ and play another club.
5 hours ago
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Michal,
I see Canada is about to legalize marijuana. With that answer, I am guessing on what side of that question you are.
17 hours ago
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Curious. What do you pitch?

I will be back tomorrow for “part 2” (of 3).
17 hours ago
David Caprera edited this comment 17 hours ago
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I did it for Walter. The late Walter “Big Train” Johnson often preached, “A singleton K is a balanced hand”. My issue was hand evaluation.
June 18
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If you are regularly bidding 30% games, the defense needs to be doubling more to protect their equity. You may make some or play safely to go down a trick less, but at 30% you are stealing. Auctions like 2N-3N are hard to hit but those like 1N-2C-2H-3H-4H may need to be pounded most of the 32% of the time trump don't go 3-2. And if the heart void wants to hit them, that is ok too (yes, this could be a 5-5 fit, but that is not the sort of thing to worry about.) Note, this assuumes you know your customer - one cannot be as agressive against conservative opponents.
June 17
David Caprera edited this comment June 17
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The idea that you should bid 37% vul games seems too agressive. Sometimes you go down more than one and sometimes they double. Curious, what do you believe the percentage for bidding game is that makes the imp odds a coin flip?
June 17
David Caprera edited this comment June 17
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My bad. I didn't appreciate he was a passed hand.
June 17
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I didn't mean to suggest that it was a relay system. 3C is a “relay bid”, defined as “tell me more.” As for whether a relay system would solve this problem? It would work fine for this responder's hand (as does Blackwood) but some of the other constructions (responder having a needed major suit jack, for example) don't get resolved below 5D in relay methods with which I am familiar.

(Mike, as you know, we shared a common partner in Varis Carey. Varis and I played the relay structure taught to him by Henry Bethe, as embellished with Varis's own creations. It has been awhile, but I am not sure we could have distinguished between xx, Kxx, xxxx, Axxx and xx, Axx, xxxx, Kxxx. By the time we got to the decision point, we would know responder's pattern, high card point range, three controls (A=2, K=1), one honor in hearts and one in clubs, but we would not know which was which. We did not play reverse relays where responder could ask about opener's hand, and opener with a 6-4 hand might have broken relay.)

In the original posting, I offered up ten possible constructions for responder. I invite relay pairs to see and report on how many of the ten they can resolve successfully.
June 17
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Geir told me exactly the same thing!
June 17
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The fear is that declarer can pitch a heart loser on the DQ. Give declarer 5=3=2=3. So it looks like we may need to get hearts going.

Comparing heart plays. When partner has Jxx, nothing matters. When partner has Txx, small immediately gives up a second heart, the Q freezes the suit, and the A just prolongs the agony. If partner has Jx (1=2=5=5?), everything works out the same. If partner has Tx, you want to stay off the suit. Partner with Jxxx? Again all the same. But when partner has Txxx, small blows a trick that A or Q does not (in the unlikely case declarer really has his bid:
AQJxxx, Jx, xx, Kxx.
Just because we are told declarer could be a comedian doesn't mean he has to be. Can partner have 4 hearts? Kevin suggests not and I tend to agree, but that might depend on the defense the opponents play over (2D)-P-(2M).)

If you lead the Q, partner will flag the J if he can. As this is all about guessing, I lead the Q, the card that might get me the information I will need when in with the SK.
June 17
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Ok, I was dinged this week on Bridge Winners for, unbeknownst to me, using the term “n-gn-g” in an offensive manner. And now someone throws “chuffed” at me, a term I have never heard. My brief internet research is that it originally meant, “swollen with fat.” If I walk into my office on Monday and say to my secretary, “My you looked chuffed”, her first reaction will be,“What?” and the second will be to contact the employment harassment reprentative.

Two countries separated by a common language.

I enjoy single malts, golf and flyfishing. Go Scotland!
June 16
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Fred, I want to make sure I understand what you are suggesting.

1C-1H (8-11)-2D-2N (best raise)-? 3C is now a relay. By our agreement, if opener breaks relay and bids 3M/4C it shows the 5-6 hand -I cannot remember it ever coming up, but is consistent with our “meta rules.” (As we approach retirement age, consistent and memorable rules have increasing importance.)

Rather you want to “splinter”? (Would you play 1C-1H-2D-2N-3M as a splinter as well?) No doubt that on this deal a splinter works well. But my experience with relay methods (and I have played some whacko ones) is that the strong hand is captain and the weak hand is crew. Do you just give up on the 5-3 major when you have a 5-4 minor? (Yes, this is all low frequency stuff.)
June 16
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Responder cannot have four card support. And 2S is a sixth piece. We would splinter on a minimum but Annie and I use the term, “I am embarrassed I opened.” If you give me four controls; A=2, K=1) and a potentially working stiff, I am living the dream and certainly not embarrassed.
June 16
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Cheering for partner to hold JTxx, AQx, Kxx, Qxx. Can't a person hope that once in their life their dreams aren't crushed like a cabernet sauvignon grape from the Medoc during harvest season. It is a beautiful thing, but maybe I wanted a pinot.
June 16
David Caprera edited this comment June 16
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Michael, I love your posts and I wish more of your peers could be encouraged to post as well. But I don't want aspiring players to be deceived, “Bridge at the higher levels requires a certain amount of memorization.” I remember having a conversation with Geoff Hampson. I said, “I don't have a good memory” to which he responded, “That's a real problem.”
The idea that understanding why you do something obviates the need to memorize has been something I have always wanted to be true, and, in fact, sometimes you can work things out from general principles, logic and reasoning. But there are some things in bridge that aren't so clear and others that are pretty arbitrary. Furthermore, bridge is a timed event and needing time to work out the meaning of a bid takes away from time you need to play and defend. It also uses up mental energy that you want to save, particularly in extended events where fatigue is a real issue.

That is the bad news. The good news is that at your age your microprocessor works so much faster than mine and your ROM is so much larger, the memorization will come easily and naturally. It should not be a deterrent to learning to play the game we love.
June 16
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Harrison, if your choices are overtake to force partner to make the right play or signal partner to have him make the right play, even if your partner is the best player in the world, it is correct to do the deed yourself. Mistakes have been made when a thoughtful partner, knowing you could have overtaken and did not do so, inferred that a different defense was required.
June 15
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Not a fan of Lebensohl here unless you mean something like “better minor Lebensohl”? After bid and raise, we play 2N is a “scramble, may be weak with hearts.”

We would not play 3H as forcing but it should be a very good hand. I don't have a strong opinion as to whether East should raise.
June 15
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