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All comments by David Caprera
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If we are below 4N, 4N is 2P2P. But above 4N you cant do everything. We double (takeout) and then bid which is “flexible.” In the rarefied air above 4N, there aren't a lot of options available.
16 hours ago
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Opener's double is takeout. The three suiter is easy. Much more difficult is the “Two places to play” hand where the opponents have taken away Michaels or 4N. There you can either bid one good suit if you have one or double and then bid a suit which is “flexible.”
16 hours ago
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The only time responder is going to have a five card suit is when he is 5-7hcp, in which case he is just going to double. If he had 8+hcp and a 5+ card suit, he would have bid it over 2D. I did omit that responder can bid 1C-(2D)-3S/4m with 5-7hcp and a reasonable 6+card suit. So, in this circumstance, I believe that responder is always going to double if opener passes.
18 hours ago
David Caprera edited this comment 17 hours ago
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I was trying not to sharpen the pencil too much by listing J, Q, K, A, QJ, KJ, KQ, AJ, AQ, AK, KQJ, AQJ, AKJ, AKQ. Perhaps I should have.
18 hours ago
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With 5-7, double is without regard to shape. With 8+ (GF) it denies a five card suit. A cuebid of 3D would be three suited, 8+HCP, and a singleton or void in diamonds.
18 hours ago
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Because this is the way I chose to present the problem. I thought it added a little bit of variety to the presentation and it is one way to attempt to get at the question of “What does it mean to say pass and pull is stronger?”
18 hours ago
David Caprera edited this comment 17 hours ago
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If you prefer, “What is the minimum number of high card points in clubs you would want to hold before you were willing to raise 5H to 6H?” (But to be honest, I think you understood the question as originally written.)
18 hours ago
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If “Questions?” is code for, “I have an odd number of hearts”, there is an obvious problem. But I am not convinced that bridge players are all that evil. It is, admittedly, an unnecessary social relic but I wouldn't advocate a penalty for someone who routinely asks.
21 hours ago
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If N-S are playing a limited opening bid system I am ok with 3S, but if these are standard methods I think that 3S is too much. Yes, I see AAK, four trump and a stiff, but, as North, I am looking for a heart control and driving this baby to slam.

As for the play, put me in the “clubs are 7-2 and hearts 6-1 camp.” East is hot and likely has his length and West doubled hearts twice (what is that all about?)
22 hours ago
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Two places to play or a weaker 5H bid for us. But I have too much to just play 5. Switch the hearts and diamonds and this becomes a death hand for us.
22 hours ago
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North might have doubled 1N. Double makes more sense if all white.
Oct. 15
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Excellent problem with three reasonable choices. Partly does depend on the partnership tendency to raise with 3 card support. Your “we play spiral” suggests that a raise on three is common. Frankly, I am not a fan of spiral, much prefering to play 1X-1M-2M-2N as F1 and tell me more.
Oct. 14
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We play it shows shortness and GF.
Oct. 14
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How would partner bid her 6-4 hand? Consider this auction. You have agreed to play “kickback” (one above the trump suit is keycard.) 1S-2H-3D-4D-? What bid is kickback? And our answer is that game bids in a known 5+ card suit are natural so that 4N is keycard. I put this problem in the same class.
Oct. 14
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Yes, one is break even, two is finesse. I don't know what I was thinking. (I wasn't.) I once spent an afternoon proving the equivalence when east has one more open space than west.

(nx(n-1)x(n+1)xnx6)+1/4x(nx(n+1)xnx(n-1)x4)=1/2x(nx(n-1)x(n+1)x(nx6)+(n+1)xnx(n-1)x4)

where n is the number of open spaces in the west hand.
Oct. 14
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If you are asking about the ACBL alert procedure, we do not alert. I don't believe that pass and bid are either subject to the alert requirements. The opponents are free to ask and, of course, we would tell them. I would also tell a screenmate and, if I was declarer, tell the opponents before the opening lead. But if you alert, someone is going to complain that you just did so to remind your partner about your agreement, claim there is UI, and that you cheat. You will be criticized for being a nice guy.

As for redouble, we have no special agreement but I am sure (I just asked Annie) that redouble is defensive values and subsequent doubles are penalty. I could be convinced that RDB shows heart shortness, again to better judge the next round. We play double as shortness in the following sequences: 2M-2N-(3X)-DBL, 3X-(DBL)-RDB-(Y)-DBL and 1M-2N-(3X)-DBL. This could similarly be used (and useful).
Oct. 12
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Assuming 3H is limit or better, we play that 3S is an “offensive oriented minimum.” This allows partner to judge over the opponents bidding 4H.
Oct. 11
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Isn't the simple answer that you should pitch approximately 1 time out of 30 and similarly finesse 29 out of 30? The defender is betting 1500 not vul to win an extra 50, a 30 to 1 shot.
Oct. 10
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When I started practicing law, there was another young associate at the firm named Bob. Bob was well-liked and unassuming but not someone you would ever call exciting. He grew up in Wisconsin, went to the state university, did not write for the law review, and had no judicial clerkship. He once told me he hoped to make enough money so that he could own three softball fields with a snack bar in the middle where he could chalk the baselines, cut the grass, and sell beer and brats.

A couple of the partners took a liking to Bob and gave him work. What they discovered was that it got done well and on time. So they gave him more. After several years, some of the firm's investment banking clients started calling Bob directly. His practice grew and he made partner.

Bob is not a gregarious person. He never wrote a definitive legal treatise, traveled the speaking circuit, supported high ranked politicians or threw lavish client parties. When he was younger, he lived alone with two beagles until one day, quite unexpectedly, he married his secretary. But Bob's practice flourished because his deals always closed, if there was a problem he solved it, and in the 40 years we have practiced together, I have never seen him make a mistake.

Bob has worked on billions of dollars of complicated securities financings. While he was managing partner, the firm doubled in size and more than doubled in profits. Bob doesn't play softball anymore and his practice has slowed down. When he is not working, he is usually found at his vacation home on Maui with his wife of 30+ years. Their gardener cuts the lawn.

So, Sabine, I am sorry I don't have any spectacular hands Debbie played in Orlando. But what I saw reminded me of Bob. Her decisions were uniformly successful and she made no mistakes. And that is how you win championships. To me, that is playing lights out.
Oct. 10
David Caprera edited this comment Oct. 11
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Everyone is congratulating Michael (rightly so) but in the boards I watched Debbie played lights out.
Oct. 9
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