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All comments by David Levin
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Excerpt of Law 73 (2017 edition):

D. Variations in Tempo or Manner

1. It is desirable, though not always required, for players to maintain steady tempo and unvarying manner. However, players should be particularly careful when variations may work to the benefit of their side. Otherwise, unintentionally to vary the tempo or manner in which a call or play is made is not an infraction. Inferences from such variations are authorized only to the opponents, who may act upon the information at their own risk. (Italics added.)
Sept. 14
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Richard, you just might now be responsible for another initiative.
Sept. 14
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Email scammers often use forged names (and email addresses), although I haven't attempted to determine whether this applies to “George Moxon”.
Sept. 14
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True, but if one accepts that West should credit East with both spade honors, this would preclude J98x with Declarer.
Sept. 14
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Supposedly his contracts often dangled by a thread.
Sept. 14
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“When West has Hxx in spades, how do you propose to make the hand?”

I don't. (Sorry, I should have said that earlier.)

“How does he know declarer doesn't have AJxx?”

I tried to convey above that once the Q holds, Declarer would place the K with West. If West started with Kx(x), then Declarer can establish the J by taking the A and ducking the third round, or vice versa.

But even with three diamond tricks, Declarer would need the 10 in order to take the needed fourth heart trick, and this card is much more likely to be with East than with South. (This is still assuming that East holds the J rather than the J.)
Sept. 14
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At http://db.worldbridge.org/Repository/tourn/wuhan.19/microSite/Results.htm, the cell in the bottom row, third column says “Finals Sessions 1-3” (which presumably should instead read “Finals Sessions 4-6”). I mention it in case this comment might be spotted by someone with the ability to make the correction.
Sept. 13
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The diamond lead at Trick 2 seems predicated on West's ducking when holding the king. But if West holds something like Kxx xx KTx Qxxxx, South's failure to immediately attack spades should suggest that East has both hidden spade honors, which would leave room for at most a jack in East's hand (assuming South didn't upgrade).

If East has the J and South the J, then ducking the diamond lets South knock out the Q for an easy nine tricks, whereas rising and exiting with a diamond (say) appears to leave Declarer unable to knock out the Q without letting the defense score three spade tricks.

If East has the J and South the J, then playing the K probably won't hurt, because Declarer would have presumably played West for the K anyway once the Q holds at Trick 2, which would have resulted in Declarer's establishing the J by ducking a diamond on the second or third round.

So, it seems right to me for West to rise at Trick 2.
Sept. 13
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If the defenders can take three spade tricks, then we're probably doomed even if the K is with West. So, I'll hope spades are favorable and lead the 4 toward the ten at Trick 2. If East wins with a kace and returns a round suit, I win in the closed hand and lead the 8 toward the queen.
Sept. 13
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+1 for “Great Firewall of China”.
Sept. 13
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Perhaps the confusion was because East cannot hold five diamonds without the 7.
Sept. 13
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I seem to recall that the term GMT has been replaced by UTC (Coordinated Universal Time).
Sept. 13
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If South held something like Kxx Axxx KQTxx x, I'd have expected a rebid of 3N rather then 4.
Sept. 12
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Here's a hypothetical scenario. I'm competing in a pair event in which everyone knows I'm the weakest player, and it is deemed acceptable to ask an opponent if hen* would like to know how to have done better on the deal just completed.

I like to temporarily clear my mind of the deal just played. So, if in every round, an opponent were to ask if I wanted advice, it would get annoying fast—even though the advice would probably be welcome between sessions (for example).

So, the practice of not asking if someone wants advice seems sensible to me.

* Swedish gender-neutral singular pronoun in the nominative and objective cases.
Sept. 11
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The last paragraph is hard to decipher.
Sept. 11
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Louis, I think Jim was saying that implicit in the offer of bridge advice is that the asker considers the askee weaker.
Sept. 11
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After West takes the A at Trick 3, Declarer should realize that there will be ample side-suit winners and that the K is offside, and therefore the goal should be to lose no more than two trump tricks. Accordingly, Declarer should duck a spade in both hands at Trick 5, to eliminate the possibility of an uppercut. If East wins and returns a heart, Dummy ruffs with the Q, takes the A, and crosses to the J so that the closed hand can lead a third round of trumps.

If at Trick 4, West shifts to a diamond (instead of continuing hearts), it seems that Declarer can do essentially the same thing.

Steve's idea of ducking the first round of clubs might succeed even if after a pause. The threatened club ruff would not only score an additional defensive trump trick, but destroy one of Declarer's club winners. But I'm not sure whether ducking the club is West's correct play in principle.
Sept. 11
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Under the ACBL's regulations, an analogous case might be where a player has available a support double and bidding two of partner's suit. I believe that the former is alertable but the latter isn't, even though many Bridge Winners members have said that this seems to conflict with the principle of full disclosure.
Sept. 8
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“You should have told her why you laughed then and there.”

According to a reply to a discussion started by Mark Raphaelson, Michael Xu did not laugh in the opponent's presence.
Sept. 8
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