Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Levin
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“One reason to discard on A is to unblock the hearts. Otherwise, I can't run hearts even if I find LHO with Kx.”

Why not cross to South's 8 and then back to North's Q?
Jan. 17
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“Because, (1) if West is holding off the first round why should change his mind on the second round (unless he sees something that changes things)? (2) This way the defense comes out ahead whenever West holds the ten of diamonds (then West knows to win the second diamond.)”

East's dropping the jack on the second round works out badly when Declarer started with 10xxx.
Jan. 16
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If dealt AK and QJ, might East have considered playing the Q at Trick 1 (hoping to induce a diamond continuation if West gets in)?
Jan. 16
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“If they play a club early, taking out the ruffing entry, declarer can still eliminate the minors and play ace and a heart, which is superior to the finesse.”

I believe that if Declarer assumes that hearts are 3-2 (which is suggested by the play), then only the finesse works when East was dealt KJx (3 cases), and only A+x works when East was dealt Jxx (3 cases).
Jan. 16
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For information about professional indemnity insurance in the US, one's insurance agent might be a good source.

If the request is from someone who might come to the US and teach bridge, one could inquire with US insurance companies.
Jan. 13
David Levin edited this comment Jan. 13
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Bidding 4N seems to have some redeeming qualities:

1. It takes away that call from West.
2. N/S are at favorable.
3. East's presumed spade length makes it extremely likely that N/S have at least an eight-card fit.
4. South can establish many tricks by driving out high cards.

[Edited to correct grammar.]
Jan. 13
David Levin edited this comment Jan. 13
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If West had bid 5 over 5 and East had then bid 6 holding AKQ-eighth xx J Kx, I wonder where folks would be placing blame.
Jan. 11
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I would have thought that West's double followed by bidding 5 (in contrast to bidding 5 directly over 4N) showed slam interest.
Jan. 11
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Nice article. A couple typos:
* Page 1, second diagram, change the declarer in the auction.
* Page 2, next-to-last paragraph, “4clubs” -> “4 clubs”.
Jan. 11
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“The key defense will be for RHO to hop up with a spade honor and shift to hearts.”

If West has A-fourth and one spade honor, then it seems okay for East to let the first round of spades ride around to West, who can then lead a heart. (I'm not saying that this would necessarily invalidate some other aspect of your analysis.)
Jan. 9
David Levin edited this comment Jan. 9
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I see that it's been fixed.
Jan. 9
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I guess that explains why it wasn't mentioned. 8^)
Jan. 8
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I didn't see it mentioned, but with AQxxx, Advancer would have been more likely to have raised.
Jan. 8
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Nice.

Typo on page 9: “isa” just below the diagram.
Jan. 8
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Pitching the x (on the 10) works if a defender started with AK, 109, A, or K, and void and x seem remote in light of the opponents' silence. It's still not good, but at least there's a chance.
Jan. 7
David Levin edited this comment Jan. 7
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I probably wouldn't think of this at the table, but perhaps leading the K at Trick 2–to appear as if I might be trying to steal our ninth trick–might induce a defender to rise and shift to spades. It shouldn't succeed on the actual layout: West takes the A and after seeing East's 10, optionally cashes one spade to get a signal, and then goes back to hearts. But it might work if both defenders have broken heart holdings.
Jan. 7
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I recall a forum comment by Sylvia Shi that said she opens a Precision 1 with less than 16 HCP if she's prepared to unilaterally compete to game.
Jan. 7
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That reason might also have been a factor in West's bidding 4 rather than 6.
Jan. 7
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I agree that North should bid diamonds on the second round. As is often said at this site, strain before level.
Jan. 5
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Bud, why would it be necessary to find players that would bid 3 over 1, rather than stipulating to the pollee how the partnership defines 3 and that this call was made with the given hand?
Jan. 3
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