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All comments by David Levin
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I took the discussion-starter to mean that the pair of deals nicely illustrates the difference.
July 7
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At https://bridgewinners.com/article/view/overtake-or-not/,
Craig Biddle comments, “This deal is an interesting parallel to the deal posted by Dave Caprera from Biarritz overnight.”
July 7
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To derive value from seeing the expert in action, one has to have already grasped the fundamentals, and I get the impression that many if not most ACBL members have not done.
July 6
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Perhaps North has the K but discards on the second diamond. Then if Declarer pitches a spade on the third diamond, North ruffs and leads to Partner's A, allowing Partner to exit with a diamond.

But if Declarer pitches a club on the third diamond, the next club pitch is certain to be useful.
July 5
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Perhaps West thought that North was probing for a grand.
July 4
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[Presumably, you draw trumps ending in hand.

To run the Q, you must now cross to the A.]

How will the play go if North has four clubs and ducks the Q?
July 4
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“Even if the queen cashes, it just sets up a diamond trick for declarer while there is still an entry in dummy.”

I'm not sure I see the harm, if Declarer has a diamond to lead toward the J.

“The diamond trick, if there is one, should still be there later when partner gets in with a probable spade trick.”

Partner might not have a (second) spade entry, and Declarer might play South for the Q based on the 2 call.
July 3
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The deal at the top of page 5 contains another potential pitfall: North might hold four clubs and the Q (in which case the contract seems to fail because there's no entry to Dummy's fifth club). Declarer could cater to this by winning the third round of spades in Dummy and leading the Q, but the gain is probably outweighed by the inability to pick up four trumps with North.

Added: Cripes, this is the second dopey analysis I've posted in two days. Leading toward the Q forces an entry to lead clubs from Dummy, while retaining the A.
July 3
David Levin edited this comment July 3
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The movie has Declarer (West) playing the K at Trick 3.
July 3
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Here's how to post to the Intermediate Forum.

1. Click “Explore” at the top of the page.
2. Mouse-over “Forums” in the dropdown menu.
3. Click “Intermediate Forum” in the pop-right menu (which is probably not the technical term for it).
4. Click “New post” just above the Intermediate Forum topics list.
July 2
David Levin edited this comment July 2
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Even top grandmasters might occasionally blunder. Petrosian once overlooked an attack on his queen in a winning position.
July 2
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Nick, how could you omit Basman?
July 2
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“Does anyone know a data structure which is good at exploiting increasing number of cards in a suit becoming equals later in the deal?”

I don't know whether this will help, but I think of a given card as having (1) an original rank, (2) a promoted rank, and (3) an effective rank. Here's a nine-card, single-suit layout showing each card's original rank:

A Q 4
J 9 6 3
8 7
The same layout showing each card's promoted rank:

A K 7
Q J 8 6
10 9
The same layout showing each card's effective rank:

A A 10
K K J 9
Q Q
July 2
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Drat. I was expecting to see interesting auctions or plays.
July 2
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Yet another line is A, A, K. This gains when East was dealt x 432 because Declarer can draw one round of trumps and arrange to ruff two hearts “high.” If the 10 remains outstanding after their heart ruff and one round of trumps, assume West has it and proceed to ruff two hearts.

Added: I'm sorry. I was thinking that North started with two hearts rather than three.
July 2
David Levin edited this comment July 2
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What are their leads? (I'm mainly interested in whether the 3 could be from 985432.)
July 2
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If the A at Trick 2 draws two low ones, I'll then lead a spade toward the king (if East ruffs, the spade finesse is marked), followed by eliminating diamonds and clubs and leading a second trump toward the jack. If West shows out, I'll win and exit with another trump to force an exit to dummy, then lead another spade.
July 2
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Maybe x xxx AQJxxx Kxx was among the earliest hands opened 2 as a diamond preempt?
July 2
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A backgammon player who picks up more than one blot at a time is likely an octopus.
July 1
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The kibitzers run out of popcorn.
July 1
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