Join Bridge Winners
All comments by David Levin
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I'm not sure there's a heart return that will always work. For example, if East led from KJ75 and Trick 2 goes 4 to Declarer's ten and East's jack, East won't know whether Partner started with Axxx (in which case East must try to find Partner's entry) or five hearts (in which case the defenders can cash out). This would be solved by West's cashing the A at Trick 2, but this play might well be too committal.
Nov. 22, 2019
David Levin edited this comment Nov. 22, 2019
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“I duck the first heart (as long as West remains on lead), then win the second round with the King.”

Rising at Trick 1 seems worth considering, as it would block the suit if West started with J10 or J9.

“At trick 3, I finesse spades. If it wins, I start building my club trick by leading low to the Jack. East will almost never fly queen from Qx(x)…”

I'm not sure this is realistic. East can see that if Declarer has the A but not the K no spade honor, Declarer will quickly establish three spades, two hearts, and two clubs. So it seems that East must play Partner for the A.

“Finally, if they can only take 3 diamonds after the spade finesse loses, but I don't get any diamonds, it means East started with AJxx or KJxx.”

On these diamond layouts, Declarer's nine becomes a stopper. So, the defenders can take only two diamonds before Declarer gets a diamond.
Nov. 21, 2019
David Levin edited this comment Nov. 21, 2019
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I'm still not sure I follow. If Dummy leads the 8 and it goes to West's stiff K, then another trump trick will still be lost. Also, leading the Q seems more likely to induce East to cover than if the 8 is led.
Nov. 15, 2019
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How is it wasting a trick?
Nov. 15, 2019
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If your range for opening 1 and rebidding 2 goes up to say 18, Partner with 8 can allow for that by rebidding 2 over 2 even with 2=3 in the minors (a “false preference”).

Going low on the second round could be vital if Partner would strain to bid with shortness in diamonds. For example, if Opener with 4=4=3=2 faces a very weak 5=3=1=4, Responder's passing 1 would strand the partnership in probably its worst strain. On a bad day, responding 1 might beget 3 by Opener, but it seems much more likely to improve the final contract.
Nov. 13, 2019
David Levin edited this comment Nov. 13, 2019
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“What's a control bid?”
Nov. 12, 2019
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Penultimate paragraph on page 2, did you mean “6=4=1=2” (rather than “4=6=1=2”).
Nov. 12, 2019
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It's not clear to me why, playing “standard” discards, North's 2 would be intended as count.
Nov. 11, 2019
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After Responder's 4, what would 4 by Opener have shown?
Nov. 10, 2019
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@Alan, I was concerned that if two spades were cashed and then East won the second round of diamonds and had a spade to exit with, this could destroy the communication needed for a round-suit squeeze against East (if dealt say, xxx Qxxx Qx Jxxx).

[Cross-posted with Josh's reply.]
Nov. 8, 2019
David Levin edited this comment Nov. 8, 2019
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After taking the K at Trick 1, I believe it's safe to cash the AQ and the A before taking the A and letting the 8 ride, in case this would exhaust East's black cards (and endplay East).
Nov. 8, 2019
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You can't be serious!
Nov. 6, 2019
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Page 2, "(if East holds 6+ of them then he might have advanced or balanced with 2♣)".
Nov. 5, 2019
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I'm not sure why it seems questionable, being that South is a passed hand.
Nov. 4, 2019
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Given the circumstances, I'm not sure how much these percentages tell us about how well the organization is run.

Travel, lodging, and food for say, a couple trustees to meet several times a year could be in the neighborhood of $100K.

An executive director could be in the neighborhood of $100K.

Grants are in the neighborhood of $100K.

These three items don't leave much room to trim from total expenses of $340K.

Raising revenue significantly might not be easy either. Posters often decry the difficulty in drawing interest in participation in bridge. I wouldn't want the task of persuading people (or institutions) to donate to bridge.

Bridge has the misfortune of not involving a disease or a disorder. Maybe fundraising would be more successful if “bridge deprivation disorder” were included in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. It's not as much of a stretch as one might think, although I'm not advocating it.
Nov. 2, 2019
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The article title made me think there was a disturbance.
Oct. 28, 2019
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I think what posters object to is teaching points without providing context. For example, if the teacher conveys that a 1N opener shows at most 17 HCP and that 25 HCP are needed for 3N, then the novice can deduce that game is possible only if Responder has at least 8 HCP.

It might actually be easier to first teach Stayman opposite a 2N opener. The novice could be prompted for the number of HCP Responder needs for game opposite a minimum 20 HCP. Stayman opposite 1N involves the added concept of having an extra level of bidding available below game-level.
Oct. 26, 2019
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I'd be interested in a histogram that was normalized for each expected score. For example, say that for an expected score of 45, the mode actual score was 46. The actual scores (also for an expected score of 45) whose counts are at least 75% of the count for the mode actual score (46) might be in the top tier. The next tier might consist of the actual scores (still for expected score of 45) whose counts were 50-75% of the count for the mode actual score of 46.

[Head-scratching by numerous readers.]
Oct. 25, 2019
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It could be worse to be called a “great la—dy.”

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/400/stories-pitched-by-our-parents (Act One)
Oct. 23, 2019
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I thought maybe the three of spades was stuck to the ace of clubs.
Oct. 23, 2019
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