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All comments by Dick Wilson
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Josh, I like 5 Soades - “Ok, dude, you pick it!”
Oct. 30, 2016
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I abstained because I played the hand and had a different auction. I was forced (almost) to bid what I think I was going to bid anyway - 3 spades. My partner and I play Reverse Bergen so I was considering 3 clubs limit raise but had decided to aggressively splinter with 3 Spades and then my LHO bid 2 spades. My decision was made - splinter! We defended 4 spades doubled down 2!
Oct. 28, 2016
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Under the new law one can open a hand 1NT with a stiff A, K, or Q. With that in mind East's first bid might have been 1NT which would make his rebid less problematic. As the auction actually went I would opt 2 spades showing my values and shape. Partner will also have a clear picture of my hand and be able to act accordingly. We discussed this after the game and I did indicate that I chose to open 1 club and partner did happen to bid 1NT with 5 diamonds just as happened at your table. I reversed with the hand in question and partner bid 3NT making 3. This hand - Board 21 - in The Common Game was not easily bid as evidenced by the results distribution. Less than half the field (48%) of 1,198 pairs in he Common Game bid and made 3NT. Interestingly, few pairs bid and made the Spade Moyesian fit game which was optimum EW score. This result could only be achieved by choosing 1 Club opening bid and then reverse.
Sept. 29, 2016
Dick Wilson edited this comment Sept. 29, 2016
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How tortally weird!! I abstained and saw that 1 person abstained. I abstained because you and I had thoroughly discussed this hand. Why my abstention became 7nt is a mystery,
Sept. 28, 2016
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Thanks
June 10, 2016
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4 Diamonds was a misclick as I was traveling in a motor coach in Scotland on a golf trip. Given the quality of my golf I'd be better off playing bridge even though I do not feel particularly good at that either.
June 7, 2016
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My vote of 4 Diamonds was intended to be 3 Diamonds (a bid with which very few agreed). Pass seemed reasonable but I follow the so-called “rule of nine”. - number of the doubled suit plus number of honors including the 10 plus the level of the doubled contract. On this hand I reach 8 which suggests that I must not convert to penalty. We're the colors reversed I would break the rule.
June 7, 2016
Dick Wilson edited this comment June 7, 2016
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Mid lick!
May 9, 2016
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3 hearts only if forcing by agreement.
May 9, 2016
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Way, way too good to pre-empt .
March 26, 2016
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Thanks, Ken. I like your use of Double. Other systems deal with this shape nicely. It is awkward for Cappelletti. Your solution which must replace double as equal or better seems to be a good one.
Feb. 26, 2016
Dick Wilson edited this comment Feb. 26, 2016
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Is the “Impossible Spade” standard or by partnership agreement?
Dec. 31, 2015
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I thought long and hard about a forcing 2 Diamonds. It just doesn't compute. Scattered honors; weak spots, balanced - it all adds up to 1NT Forcing. After all, the range for the bid is 5-12. It may be at the top but it is definitely not over the top.
Dec. 30, 2015
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West cannot pass 3 Clubs with 16 HCPs opposite 10-12. Club slam may be there but I would opt for 3NT. 3 Spades would probably deny a Diamond stopper and my sense is that partner must have a diamond card. I played this board holding the East Cards Q3 Ax Qxxxx Axxx. After 2 Clubs I made the forcing bid of 3 Diamonds asking partner to bid 3NT with a Spade Stopper. He did so.

I was playing opposite Steve Surasky and Rhoda Kratenstein at the Boca Raton Duplicate Bridge club. They are excellent players who had a fine 71% game today. They benefited by my misplay of the spade suit on this board. We made 3 NT and should easily have made 4. Steve was somewhat critical of my 3 Diamond bid but I was comfortable with whatever action my partner took after that bid.
Dec. 30, 2015
Dick Wilson edited this comment Dec. 30, 2015
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Is this the “Third Pair” or is there still more to come?
Sept. 19, 2015
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4 Clubs is Key Card asking…
Sept. 13, 2015
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I play this with the person from whom you probably learned it, Ed. Gavin's system is more extensive than what we play. I have just e-mailed my partners with whom I play 4-way transfers asking those who are willing to implement it.
Sept. 13, 2015
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Simply, succinctly, and sagely stated.
Sept. 7, 2015
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4 Diamonds has to be right. I chose the key card ask but I should give partner the opportunity to show a spade card.
Aug. 30, 2015
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This says it all!
Aug. 18, 2015
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