Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Ed Herstein
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Thanks, I'll look for it.
Aug. 11
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Thanks.
Aug. 11
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Probably won't be easy to find!
Aug. 11
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2 (shortness in a pointed suit) - 2 (4+ spades, correctable) ; 2NT (spade shortness) - Pass.
Aug. 11
Ed Herstein edited this comment Aug. 11
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Thanks for you thoughts. I like your ideas about 1, it's clearly worth thinking about.

An extensive study of world championship hands a few years ago showed that weak and strong notrump openings achieved almost identical results at IMPs.

I have no idea of how the 2m openers will do, but I don't think Precision players consider it a major liability to open 2 with three-suiters short in diamonds. The proposed method is probably a bit better because 2m is a long suit and thus may be passed.

My friends are committed to playing a strong club. In my experience, the biggest problem about playing it against weak opponents is that they have no idea what their 1 - 2 and 1 - P - 1 - */2/2 auctions show!
Aug. 11
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I'll have to ask my “five-card 1M over 1” friend how he handles these. Off-hand, I'd not play two-over-one and without extras I'd bid two of my longer minor (2 if five-five) over 1 - 1NT. As responder with 10 HCP and 4351 shape, I'd bid 2 (a “new” suit) over 1..

After 1 - 1, I think a double should show four-plus hearts.
Aug. 11
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I also agree. One guideline I use is to show a short, weak suit only if I believe there's a good chance that we'll wind up in a superior contract.
July 1
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No less an authority than Michael Rosenberg asserted that queen-third should be considered a stopper in this auction.
July 1
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Yup, that's right.
June 25
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It's a problem if responder needs to have more than a high honor in the minor to bid slam. In that case, the best he can do is to bid 4MT as Last Train and expect opener will often go on with better trump support. (I prefer not use 4NT as an RKC-ask in minor-suit auctions.)

Perhaps a bigger problem with these methods is that opener needs to bid 4 to deny a high honor, not so good if responder with a long minor wants to play in 3NT if opener DOESN'T have a high honor there. I'm working on a solution – stay tuned!
June 25
Ed Herstein edited this comment June 25
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The latter.
June 24
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Well, 2, 2, 2NT, 3, and 3 are all often followed by stiff-showing bids, and 3 and 3 show one. Given how often they come up, it seemed reasonable to describe the entire structure. And yes, over 1NT - 2 ; 2M - 3oM, opener must ask for the stiff if he's interested.
June 24
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Openers actions (3NT or 4) over 1NT- 2♣ ; 2x - 3m are now clarified above.

Re (41)(53) hands, responder doesn't need to worry about his short major in 3NT if opener has bid it over Stayman. He might, however, bid 3!m with length there for reasons described in the article.

If opener bids 2 over 2, responder has no way to show a stiff major. He can, however, bid his longer minor to see if it will run. Knowing opener has only 2-3 cards in his stiff, he can then make an intelligent judgment about whether opener is likely to have the stopper(s) necessary to make 3NT. This isn't as good as specifying his stiff, but it's better than blasting 3NT.
June 24
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You're right – late at night is a poor time to edit carefully (though I did try!).

1) Sequences after 3oM in Stayman auctions have been clarified.

2) Over 1NT - 3M ; 4M is a cuebid with slam interest in the longer major (corrected above). I like your idea of reversing 4 and 4! Another possibly is to bid the fragment rather than the stiff. This has pluses and minuses, but it does allow responder to always cuebid below game.
June 24
Ed Herstein edited this comment June 24
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It should be there – corrected.
June 24
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It's worth noting that the primary purpose of Trash Twos is to make life hards on the opps, not necessarily to reach the optimum low-level contract. A simulation of 100,000 hands showed that without three-card or better support, responder has an invitational or better hand only about 15 percent of the time. and the response structure allows us to find most of these. We'll lose on the small number of hands where we might simply want to compete for a partscore in opener's second suit (if any) and of course when we can be whacked out for a substantial penalty.

I agree that one needs to be more cautious when playing at IMPs, though I'm not sure that giving up a Trash Two in clubs is a superior approach given their lack of frequency. At any rate, a partnership is free to impose whatever constraints it wishes on suit length and quality, hand shape, and high-card strength. All I can say after using this approach for a few years and given it requires a decent suit if vulnerable, the more often we opened a Trash Two, the better our results.
Aug. 20, 2018
Ed Herstein edited this comment Aug. 20, 2018
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True, but the opps can't be sure. Opener will have a six-card suit one-third of the time and responder can have three-, four-, or even five-card support. Knowing whether responder holds a high honor has proven to be very helpful on defense and we've yet to get burned. Perhaps my thoughts will change if we get nailed a few times.
Aug. 19, 2018
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I agree. My partners and I believe our results have been overwhelmingly positive, but it would be very useful to have some hard data so I'll start recording all our Trash Two results.
Aug. 19, 2018
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My bad – I left out a line (corrected above).
Aug. 18, 2018
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All interesting ideas. I was attempting to suggest something useful without getting into transfer advances which, in one way or another, are likely to be a superior approach.
June 18, 2018
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