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All comments by Ed Judy
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I believe it is close to idiocy to believe that contributing articles (like Karen's) are officially reviewed or ghost-written. I simply called the comment “stupid” but it fact it is trollish….and successful, since it pissed me off.

Of course, an Editor of the Bulletin (which is also a house organ) is a knowledgeable bridge player who might well have a suggestion to a writer from time to time on any number of matters. He or she is also a loyal employee who must be sensitive to any matters of substance that might be outside the parameters of good taste or in potential conflict of ACBL “official” policy.
11 hours ago
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For many, bridge – like life at its best – is a flowing, changing process in which nothing is fixed.

Well-known, if not great U.S. theorists include Culbertson, Kaplan, Roth, perhaps Bergen and certainly Rodwell. Others will follow.
23 hours ago
Ed Judy edited this comment 23 hours ago
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I was hoping, for once, that no one would call a 9-card suit as “trumps.”
Sept. 19
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Fly-speck, picayune point. For your benefit, I should have written “her articles ‘would’ have.”
Sept. 19
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This comment has been marked as inappropriate by the moderator(s).
Sept. 19
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How about adding in the expense of a few events and the cost per bridge deal played for your entire experience? I wouldn't want to know :)
Sept. 19
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“Walking distance” restaurants don't exist in Orlando resort hotels. However you cut it, this is not an event for those with tight budgets.
Sept. 19
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Yes, “Edgar” and “EK” were understood, at one time, as synonymous with Edgar Kaplan.

Rumor has it that some referred to him as “Old Money-Bags!”
Sept. 19
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Mike Becker's contribution above has drawn a record-breaking (?) 57 well-warranted “likes”.

But this piece strikes me as rather funny. Is it possible, just possible, that B&G are having some fun here? Surely, all these players are aware that “cheating” is and has been in the air for quite some time. If so, maybe it's a good time to lighten up?

I, for one, might break up laughing with all the antics going on – imagine your screen-mate Garozzo with his face almost level with the table!
Sept. 19
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Karen Walker's current series in the ACBL Bridge Bulletin titled “Table Feel” discusses and relates to several situations and issues that are mentioned in this thread.

Presumably, her articles have the endorsement of appropriate officials of the ACBL and reflect recommended good practices within NA jurisdictions.

(“Table feel - part 7, under ”Bidding Matters"appears in the September issue; previous issues are available on-line to acbl members. Perhaps also at kwbridge.com.)
Sept. 19
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If you have access, see RP's Modern Bridge Conventions (beginning on page 156) regarding responsive and related calls.
I believe these are/were mainstream understandings, circa 1981.
Sept. 19
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BWS 2017 is simply:

“Among advancer's actions over responder's raise: a double is responsive (for takeout or showing general values, depending on level).”
Sept. 19
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And, in turn, may the multi partnership consult your written defense?
Sept. 16
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Ian, don't know if all would do as you would.
Sept. 16
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Edgar Kaplan's name is mentioned only twice (I believe) in the Wikipedia discussion of “cheating” in bridge from 1933 to date.

Here are the two:

(1)

Accusation by Tobias Stone, 1958
The 1958 Bermuda Bowl was held in Como, Italy. The Italian team was leading and, as was usual at the time, were holding their hands over their heads so that kibitzers could see them and follow the action. However, Tobias Stone claimed that the Italians were holding their hands aloft only when they were strong but lower when weak. The officials asked the Italians, who felt insulted by the insinuation, to keep their hands low at all times.
Back in the United States after having lost by a large margin, Stone continued to accuse the Italians of cheating and the Italians threatened a lawsuit. The American Contract Bridge League (ACBL) censured Stone and barred him from international play for one year owing to his “conduct unbecoming a representative of the American Contract Bridge League.” Stone sued the ACBL for $25,000 in damages for defamation and asked the court to set aside the one-year ban. A petition by one hundred prominent players moved the ACBL to drop the ban and Stone dropped the lawsuit.
Analysis of the boards played at the match was undertaken by Charles Goren and also by Edgar Kaplan together with Alfred Sheinwold. Kaplan and Sheinwold concluded that it was impossible to prove either side of the issue. Goren was unconvinced that the Italians cheated and felt that the Americans did not do well because they were distracted by the thoughts of being cheated; Goren publicly apologised to the Italians.

(2)

Terence Reese and Boris Schapiro, 1949-1965
Terrence Reese and Boris Schapiro were among the world's best partnerships between 1948 and 1965.
Early incidents
Having been on the team in 1948 when Britain won the European Teams title, Reese and Schapiro were invited in late 1949 to play on the next British team but were disinvited four months later without explanation.
According to Alan Truscott, during the trials for the 1950 British team, Reese and Schapiro were in the lead when Maurice Harrison-Gray withdrew, asking for an inquiry into Reese and Schapiro's performance; his request was refused and he was reprimanded and barred for one year from international play. However, Gray led the British team to victory in the 1950 European Championship, and captained it in the 1950 Bermuda Bowl. Other sources suggest that Gray withdrew from international play because of disagreements with the British Bridge League over the running of the game.
Rumors about the British pair resulted in Edgar Kaplan being designated to keep an eye on Reese and Schapiro during the 1955 Bermuda Bowl in New York; Kaplan found nothing.
At the 1960 championship held in Turin, Eric Murray told Reese “your opponents are quite convinced they were being cheated”. Don Oakie of the USA also identified suspicious mannerisms but was asked to keep quiet to avoid embarrassment. Harold Franklin was asked to pass the information to the British Bridge League; he did not do this but did tell Reese that there were suspicions. Reese and Schapiro did not participate on British teams again until 1964 in New York when they lost a semi-final to Italy.
Sept. 16
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I assume this book (article) is the one that Judy Kay-Wolff gave us a heads-up to in previous comments on BW.

Please advise, Judy, if I'm mistaken.
Sept. 15
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Bill, yes – but why does that totally negate any validity in the premise (Italian bidding style contribution).
Sept. 15
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I guess I'm part of the naive group. The OP seem to pose a reasonable observation. I'm a bit bewildered by all the cheating insinuations…
Sept. 14
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Yes, diamonds were indeed the danger in the actual deal.

(It was in a home game on Tuesday since our two local clubs had, by untimely governmental procedures, closed down due to hurricane Florence.)

My hand as south was something like KQ9xx-AQx-xx-xx and the best possible result was 11 tricks in spades.

I found it to be an interesting and highly unusual problem; hence, the query. Thanks for votes and comments.
Sept. 13
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Jeff,
Thanks for the link.
I like the “flavor.”
Sorry I don't have the air miles that the author does; getting to, let alone staying, to Hawaii is hardly cheap.
Sept. 13
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