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All comments by Florian Alter
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T/O. No special agreements about what 3 would have shown.
July 15
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Considering the features of the West hand:
Positive:
- 5c suit, including two honors
- no unsupported queens/jacks

Neutral:
- one ace (average number of aces for a 12HCP bal. hand is 1.27)

Negative:
- poor spot cards

Altogether this makes it a good 12-count, but in my point of view it's not worth an upgrade strength-wise.

I also ran a simulation of how often 3NT makes opposite a random balanced 12-count. For 11 x 1,000 deals:
3NT succeeds in 40.35% +/- 1.61% of cases.
June 2
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An easy fix to this problem is to play the transfer accept as fit showing, usually 3-card fit. With two hearts you simply bid 3NT. The advantage of this approach is its simplicity and the clarity of follow-up bids:
2NT - 3; 3 - 4 is a control bid
2NT - 3; 3NT - 4 shows second suit

I've seen people play it reversed, but I don't see how this is superior in any way.
May 9
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I've played 2 Puppet for a while and eventualy switched back to playing standard Stayman. The arguments sound convincing, but I can't remember one hand where playing Puppet showed a big gain over Stayman. However, the loss of Garbage Stayman was painful. Additionally, the bidding becomes much more complex, which for practical purposes is usually a sign that the convention is not so great after all.

Another option is to integrate a 2NT or 3 Puppet to protect declarer's hand opposite GF hands.
May 1
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Interesting problem without the double? What option but pass do you consider?
May 1
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Yes. I believe quite many hands should bid 3NT on 15hcp.
April 30
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Transfer followed by bidding shortness seems the most practical approach to me. You will be able to locate M-fits most of the time.
April 29
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A three-suit delayed duck squeeze to be precise. There is also a two-suit variant.
April 25
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Strong opponents. Typically they bid what they have but there are no guarantees. Partner is an expert player.
April 25
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Dummy is marked with strength in . I better cash the A before declarer discards his (s) on .
April 16
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As Alan described, this is a ruffing double squeeze(which can be played as a regular double squeeze if anything else than a is led). For further reading I recommend Love, Bridge Squeezes Complete (second edition), p.336-338.
April 16
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3. This hand must be strong enough to move on. The bidding indicates that the layout is favorable for our side. It's not clear yet which strain is best. 3 says exactly that and may allow us to rebid 3.
April 14
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Cahsing the A seems to be a poor play. What are you going to do if the K does not drop?
April 5
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Yes, I have it on Windows.
April 4
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Anant:
I don't see what you gain by ducking. Winning the king and exiting passively is the almost the same thing, with the only difference that you have scored one trick and declarer having played an additional trick in one of the majors.
April 3
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In my opinion this should show values in clubs, usually with fit. This comes up frequently and does two good things:
(a) Partner can evaluate his hand appropiately and bid accordingly
(b) It helps with the lead in case opponents end up declaring

Here is an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBxyAZJcLRw&t=7484s
April 3
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Damian:
Strictly speaking, you're right. In my mind I excluded these layouts, since either LHO would have led his singleton or would have pitched a rather than a .
April 3
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The 10 works in that scenario as well.
April 3
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Declarers line of play suggests that we are not going to cash 4 tricks. Partner may well have the J8 or declarer AQ doubleton, leaving declarer one trick short. This indicates that we don't need to open the suit yet.

Imagine declarer holding AQx A7xx 9x Qxxx. If we play a , we are about to establish declarers 9th trick in clubs!

I feel like the passive 10 is the percentage play here.

EDIT: A small spade seems to do the job as well, since even if declarer has AQ10x, the suit would block.
April 3
Florian Alter edited this comment April 3
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Sathya:
The discard doesn't help him at all. When you lead the K, RHO will be left with two trumps and two diamonds, and will have to give you the J in the end. The only time you have to deviate from Line 1 is if diamonds break 0-6.
April 3
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