Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Gábor Szőts
1 2 3 4 ... 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As a big club enthusiast I liked the article very much. At the same time it has raised some questions.
I wonder if you use the same 8-step reply structure in a side suit when skipping the 2 trump ask.
Also, if opener, instead of asking for controls, chooses to bid a suit, do you use some step support/strength showing structure?
And third, if you don't mind, what does 1-1-2 mean?
May 7, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Adam and Steve, you presented your case very well, a must-read for those who wish to improve their defensive bidding in this area.

What I still fail to see, sorry that I keep repeating myself, is where you benefit from defining a border under which you are in a forcing situation. As far as I can see all the methods you present can be equally applied if you are not in a forcing situation.

I believe it is a good thing to let the opponents stew in the juice of their 7-card fit on the 2-level when strength between the sides is about evenly distributed. If you bid on in such cases you are taking over the opponents' minus. And if you are short in the opponent's suit you can double for takeout in spite of not being forced to do so.
Feb. 21, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In reply to Adam:
I can't see how treating the situation as nonforcing prevents using Lebensohl. Also, I am not afraid of being passed out with a penalty double hand: if partner is short in their suit he will reopen, if he has game-going values he will again reopen. When he will not reopen is when they are in our suit and we have no game, which is just the situation when we don't want to declare.
Feb. 9, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Steve, why even play forcing to 2? With the take-out double idea you can bid if you wish and pass when in their suit - partner would have doubled (or will double) with a T/O hand of his own, otherwise you are just fine playing a partscore in their suit.
If any one of you is afraid of missing a game because he has extra strength, he can bid even with length in their suit. Otherwise, bidding just saves them.
Feb. 8, 2013
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Very good hand it is, yes. But it is still a T/O X of spades. As all T/O doubles, this does not guarantee shortness in the doubled suit _if you are so strong that you can handle all responses from partner_. If you have the hand which intended to rebid 1NT and is short in spades, you can now double again. If you have a strong genuine T/O of D's with longish spades, you can now _pass_ and wait for partner to reopen with some strength and short spades. You are not going to miss game if partner passes it out with his 5 HCP's.
Besides, I don't like the ‘very good hand’ idea. Partner will have to guess your hand based on opp's bidding, and I prefer to base my decisions on partner's bidding.
June 2, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The second double is T/O of spades and shows a good hand. As the opponents may be bidding on tram tickets for me this is a Lebensohl situation where 2NT is the preamble to signing off. Therefore I bid 3D here to show some values.
June 2, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
at least invitational, not afraid of penalty pass
April 18, 2012
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
invitational (not forcing)
April 18, 2012
1 2 3 4 ... 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92
.

Bottom Home Top