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All comments by Hanan Sher
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Don't think Harald is right. Lebanon could have been assigned to play in other zones, including the one that Egypt plays in. Or Asia.
Jan. 19
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Michael Hargreaves is of course correct, up to a point. If the law assessing punishment is flawed, Fantunes have redress. But the EBL's decision was based on an interpretation of the facts, ie did the card positioning by Fantunes constitute a signal? EBL said it did. That is a matter of bridge expertise, which is not the sport appellate court's area of expertise.
Jan. 10
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On the face of it, the CAS ruling would seem to invalidate the most basic of legal principles, that accused should be judged by their peers. in this case, an organization without proper knowledge of bridge overrules an organization dedicated to bridge. that appears to be the kind of world we now live in. alas
Jan. 10
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Winston sure. But like all other sports, there should be some kind of eligibility rule. I don't know about the Polish players, like Pepsi, who play in the U.S., but I do know that Migry and Sam Lev, both Israelis who played for national teams here before moving to the U.S., didn't immediately switch to the U.S. team when they moved to the U.S. There was something of a cooling-off period before they switched, assume under someone's regs though I don't know for sure. And when Matthew Granovetter lived in Israel for a number of years (I'm pretty sure he's a double citizen, as am I matter of fact) I don't think he was seconded onto the Israeli national team immediately. Switching countries is ok, but there has to be some kind of limit. (Just as, for example, there probably was – again I don't know for sure, correct me if I'm wrong – some kind of time gap before H&H and Fantunes were eligible to play for Monaco).
Dec. 31, 2017
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Kudos to the U.S. team for what appears to be a very nice win. Also to the Chinese. i'm sure they deserve it. And I have no stake either way. Even though nobody asked me, it seems strange that in the same year they apparently represent China in the Worlds at Lyon they can also compete to represent another country in international competition. Seems to me you pays your money and takes your choice – but that it's problematic to have it both ways. The eligibility rules should be examined, for Juniors as well. (Let's take a hypothetical case where the Kaplan team lost in the finals, and all decided to take grad courses at Tel Aviv or the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and enter the Israeli trials. I don't think that would go down very well locally, even if the transplanted team had a better chance that a home-grown squad to get onto the World podium.)
Dec. 31, 2017
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Congrats. Much deserved….
Aug. 24, 2017
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all looks very exciting but what happened? what was the outcome? who held the N-S cards? Understand that the winning margin was 5 IMPS, but have not (yet) found details of this hand. NABC Bulletin says there was 8-IMP swing, gives no details.
July 31, 2017
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Cayne and Schwartz, but calm this time.
July 27, 2017
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I returned to OK less than a year ago and, truth to tell, feel somewhat relieved. Despite the cost, I find what I call the “reliability factor” a major advantage. Though I still play on BBO, when I'm there I find the propensity of so-called World Class and Expert players who turn out to have little or no expertise to hop into games maddening. That's not true, of course, when you're playing with (and against) people you know, or with whom you are familiar. In short, the games at OK may not be as good as some of those on BBO, but there are far fewer duds (except on the rare occasions when, I suspect, someone else uses the OK owner's account).
June 12, 2017
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Gary you're right. Everyone should be identifie. Some of the players might not be identified very easily by first name: Morgan talks about one of them as something like Eytay, not sure who that might be. Overall, though, it's a great idea, particularly since it lets some of us who live far away get a real glimpse of some top players we may not have encountered any other way.
May 4, 2017
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I have now checked, and there's no notice of this (major) change on the ACBL website. Which makes me wonder if all the posters on here, including me for sure, have been “had.”
April 1, 2017
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oops. someone just reminded me that it's April Fool's Day. Should have verified before commenting, though the shortcomings of the wbf are very much an issue, foolin' or not.
April 1, 2017
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Protecting the interest of ACBL members living in the U.S., Canada and Mexico (and are eligible to represent their countries in international competition) is understandable, admirable and commendable. Certain other aspects of the ACBL decision are more difficult to understand. Principally the idea that in even-numbered years, when non-resident ACBL members are allowed to compete, NABCs will become the de facto, if not the de jure, world championships. For two principal reasons: The lack of a current ACBL framework for the kind of competition between official national teams representing a national bridge organization, as is the case in the BB and other WBC events. And the assumption/presumption, all of its own, that the ACBL can decide, apparently on its own, that events it runs are World Championships. Remind me if I'm wrong, but I cannot think of any other national organization that deems to call its premier event/events the world championship. In tennis, for example, the premier events (Wimbledon, French, Australia and U.S.) don't do so, nor do they do so in golf, swimming, or other sports (those that have Worlds do so through a sponsoring roof organization, something like the WBF). America/North America's Major League Baseball, of course, is the only/one of the few sports organizations to call its championship the World Series and proclaim the winner World Champion. That may have been OK when hardly anyone outside the U.S. and Canada played the game, it's certaingly a misnomer today (even after the U.S. won, for the first time, the recent World Baseball Classic).
Though the ACBL apparently has chosen not to formally explain why it's leaving the WBF, the reasons are pretty easy to figure out. Jurisdictional problems as exemplified by the recent cheating scandals, financial issues, bureaucratic issues and possibly/probably worse. But the effects of its decision are manifold. It effectively means that there no longer will be an internationally recognized world champion and it seriously erodes the ACBL's primacy as the leader of the bridge world. Worst of all, perhaps, it would seem to do serious financial damage to top bridge professionals, who (I assume, please correct if I'm wrong) earn a substantial part of their income from fees for playing in NABCs.
I'm not either for or against the decision, it's entirely the ACBL's business and I have not belonged to the ACBL in more than 50 years. But it certainly raises some interesting issues, worthy of discussion by the BW community.
April 1, 2017
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Might this be connected with Nicolas Hammond's March 7 bridgewinners post on BZ's “strange mannerisms”? Or is there other material? The post, as Hammond notes, was anonymous – for whatever that's worth or not worth.
March 10, 2017
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It's the high of winning. There are lots of examples of that, in all kinds of fields. Winning is a drug that's addictive.
Feb. 17, 2017
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I don't mind Richard, though I must say I only saw one comment by Futrell. I try to express what I think is right, even if it's not the popular, conventional wisdom. In this case, I genuinely feel sorry for all three of the “banned” pairs, think it's a terrible waste of talent and intelligence – even if they deserve the punishment, which I think they do.
Feb. 15, 2017
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Peter's English, so I don't suspect he'd know, Gary. I don't know either, though I would imagine that the decision might be subject to review by the courts, though that would likely be a long and expensive project that Fisher and Schwartz would be unlikely to undertake.
As for other questions, I noticed that Eitan Levy, a member of the Special Ethics Committee, has posted in this thread. He might be able to speak authoritatively on this and other issues, if he so desires.
Feb. 15, 2017
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:)
Feb. 15, 2017
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It can be said to explain, to some extent, why it took a terribly long time. There were those here in Israel who got very restless about the delay.
Feb. 14, 2017
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Should I say it's mutual, Jack. Entirely
Feb. 14, 2017
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