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All comments by Jack Oest
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Fixed. Thanks very much
April 8
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For about the last seven years I had the privilege of playing with Billy once or twice a year at one of our sectionals. He was a wonderful man, a lightning fast player, and a terrific card player. It was like playing with a founding father. At dinner, I would pepper him with questions about the early days when he was winning Bermuda Bowls and partnering some of the other legends of yesteryear. He would answer them all graciously and modestly. What a loss but how lucky I was to know him.
April 7
Jack Oest edited this comment April 8
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Playing a diamond (7 for attitude) seems clear. If declarer has something like QJxxxx xxx KJx Kx the switch gets it two tricks. If I cash the ace of clubs first: (a) partner cannot get me back in for a second diamond play and (b) declarer might guess how to ruff out the club suit to escape for down one.
Nov. 4, 2018
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Eduard, as I think I mentioned I did not purport to analyze every hand in question. Perhaps one reason I did not mention the Chiaradia hand you mention is because he did not play in the event I was discussing.
Sept. 22, 2018
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Boy I never post on Bridge Winners but feel compelled to do so here. Like many people here I began playing in my teens (in the 60s) and was in awe of the unwavering success of the Italian Blue Team. They never lost and I took at face value all the accolades thrown their way in the bridge press.

Looking back on it all, I know I was young then but would rather not admit how naive I must have been. I have a huge bridge library, with complete collections of many things, including The Bridge World magazine and all the World Championship books. Just for fun, I like to page through these once in a while. Beginning several years ago, in the course of so doing, but now with a lifetime of bridge experience behind me, I came across so many hands like the ones Avon suggests that it became clear beyond argument in my mind that those consistently remarkable results could not have been accomplished without ‘something extra’ going on.

I too thought about knuckling down, with so many resources at my disposal, and tabulating what I knew would be a very long list of occurrences, then consulting with expert players who would hopefully validate my fears. But life got in the way.

Even in my youth, I remember one hand from very near the end of the 1968 world final. Camillo Pabis-Ticci held J84 9 A10763 A986.

The bidding was pretty close to 1S on his right, 2H on his left; 2S on his right; 3S by LHO and 4S on his right. It certainly looks right to try to deal partner ruffs and that is what he did. Only he started with his SHORTER suit, clubs. Needless to say that was right.

Yes I know I know I know “one hand does not prove anything” but there were many many hands. IMHO Avon is doing the game a great service by bringing all this out into the open, no matter how many years after the fact it may be
Sept. 21, 2018
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Of course if you want to ‘solve these problems at the table’ you will also want to get used to 'all move please! next round!" :)
June 10, 2018
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That must surely qualify as the most impressive thing I've ever read on Bridge Winners! I had known of Martin's brilliance but not this amazing story.
May 16, 2018
Jack Oest edited this comment May 16, 2018
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SI did have a column but Charles Goren authored it
Jan. 16, 2017
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An incredibly worthy recipient who has contributed mightily to bridge for over half a century. I agree with the above posters that,although this award may be long overdue, it is richly deserved. Congratulations Eddie!
Jan. 16, 2017
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Congratulations Oren. I can say I knew you when. :)
Aug. 17, 2015
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Philip: I did not know about yours but I did now about Adam's (via the Kaplan Estate), Jeff's, and (by rumor) Kehela's. Jim Hall (a Minneapolis player who passed away a little over ten years) also told me had one but I don't know what happened to it (assuming he had one). It's also possible Doug Doub has one.

I seem to recall Edgar telling me many years ago that there ‘four or five’ in the world although perhaps he didn't know of all of them.
June 10, 2015
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I was given a lifetime subscription by my parents about 30 years ago and what a wonderful gift that was! But yes I am giving up my ‘freebie’ in order to do my bit for a great magazine (although not as great now as it once was).

Of course I went crazy on collecting back issues and now own one of about maybe four or five complete collections in the world so I am not necessarily the most rational actor on this topic.
June 10, 2015
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Congratulations to all of you guys for a great final match.
May 19, 2014
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Great job Kit. Your discussion of the merits/demerits of odd-even at the end of your article was superb, one of the best I've seen frankly.
Dec. 9, 2013
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I have always played simple count here. At least both players know what is going on. A long time ago Jeff Meckstroth told me this is what he and Eric played (they certainly may have changed in the meantime) remarking to me at the time “at least we'll get some of them right”.

As much as I understand the sentiment of telling partner ‘what he needs to know’, it does not work in practice in my experience since too often both partners are justifiably not on the same wavelength about what they already know and what they think they need to know.
Nov. 11, 2013
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I will miss Walter as well. The first time I ever played against him (in our youths) he overcalled against me on a three card heart suit (the KQJ to be precise).

More recently, I got to know him again through BBO (broadcasting matches and otherwise)where we would chat about all sorts of aspects of bridge. He was always friendly, insightful and a real tribute to the game we all love. My condolences to his wife and children.
March 23, 2013
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This is a mandatory cue-bidding situation after a serious slam try. It is a matter of partnership agreement whether a four heart cue by me denies a diamond control. If so I have to bid 4D. If not, I might bid 4D anyway or 4H and then 5D.
Sept. 17, 2012
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Good job Steve. At the time I remember thinking it unlikely anyone would play for the squeeze but your point about leading early toward the J10xx is excellent.
Aug. 24, 2012
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I'm not sure I fully understand Michael's point on chess clocks. He mentions that the declarer would be docked if he failed to claim with 13 top tricks. In ‘Chess Clock World’ would the opponents also suffer the ‘time penalty’ incurred here defending 6NT with twelve top tricks?
Nov. 6, 2011
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