Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jane Ahnger
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This is an interesting question. I stopped playing Jacoby 2NT years ago because I never really liked the system, mainly for the reasons you outlined. I play something different now to show the same type hand and it has worked out so much better. Won't bore you with it because you seem more interested in staying with Jacoby but with improvements. Good luck. I hope you can find some answers. There is always room to improve an old system and I did not know there were already this many variations.
Feb. 16, 2017
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Our bidding did not go as suggested. South (me) opened one diamond and my partner bid two clubs. I bid three hearts, he bid three spades, I bid four spades and he passed. I believe he should have bid more, as I had shown him a huge hand with my jump shift and now he knows we have a fit and lots of points. He also should know my exact distribution. He did say he should have bid one spade first, and then I will splinter with four clubs. We will probably find the slam then, not sure if we would bid the grand but we should at least be in six.
Jan. 21, 2017
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Every year. At least that is what it is called on the notice I receive.
Jan. 18, 2017
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Ray,

I was aware of the binding arbitration issue. I am not an elite player, or a professional, and rarely play in tournaments either, so for me, it is not a big concern. I suspect that this issue means little to most of the ACBL members as well, but can understand how it could perhaps be a problem for the professional player or for someone who does play in a lot of tournaments. Since you did not clarify the case details in your post, I have no idea why the member had the problem. If your intent was to inform and educate all of us that when we renew our membership we should be aware of what we are agreeing to, then why not just do that? Does the member know this is now being discussed on BW? You seem to know a lot about this case so I wonder if you are involved somehow.

If someone objects to the arbitration statement, does this mean they can not renew their membership? Seems like you either agree or not, but if not, then you can't stay a member.
Jan. 18, 2017
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My daughter and my grand kids have no interest in bridge. They are all smart enough and could easily learn the game if they were willing to put in the time, but they are not into a game that would take so long to learn to become proficient, plus having to find partners and a time to play. My grand kids are both in college, and neither of them have the time. One of them has a part time job along with full time classes and extracurricular activities, and the other is a football player. (Yes, he has a brain as well.)

I initially learned by watching my parents play. No computers, cell phones, video games, etc. It was board games or cards mostly for entertainment. Not much relevant on TV either in those days, so bridge became an important and fun part of my life. In college, everyone played, either in the dorms or the student unions. I don't think clubs were part pf the equation however and I was not a member of the ACBL until a few years later. I don't think I even knew the organization existed.

Bridge was not offered in my school or college and for the most part, I don't think this has changed much in the USA. Bobby Wolff believes that until there is enough interest to get bridge in the schools so that students can actually discover the game and learn about it, bridge will remain a game that is going to die out eventually. I believe bridge has so much to offer, but perhaps it has more to offer the older adult who has more time. It is a great way to keep the brain active, and does not require someone to be very physically active, at least not on the club or social level. Elite levels of bridge are different, of course, but most of us do not play at that level.
Jan. 2, 2017
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I should have been a little more clear. Our club owners/directors do explain what the rules are regarding poor behavior. Our clubs are zero tolerance (I know, there can be a wide interpretation about that but the directors do the best they can) and the directors make that announcement several times a week. They also discuss recurring issues if there happens to be an increase in an infraction. Once in awhile for example, there will be an increase in revokes, or leads out of turn, or whatever. When this happens, our directors will inform us that the “bridge devils” have been at work again that week and ask us to be more careful. I just don't know if there are written rules in a binder somewhere regarding behavior. I think there probably is. My opinion is that there should be but that is just my opinion.

Committees at the club level where I play have not occurred in a long time either. I would say most of our players don't want or expect one. Our directors try very hard to be fair but no one is perfect. What usually happens is that our directors will concur with other directors if they are unclear about a decision, check the rule book when necessary, etc. Our directors even contact the ACBL for director advice once in awhile, and the ACBL responds quickly to answer their questions. I have no complaints about our directors where I play.
Dec. 6, 2016
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Can you define misbehavior? I sat on a committee a few years ago at our local club because the player involved wanted a committee to review what the director decided regarding a ruling. I am not sure a club member like me, who is not a director, is qualified to decide if the director's ruling was correct or not, but this is what happened. There were three of us on the committee, none of us were directors but all were long time players, and we felt that the director ruling was valid and correct, but did we really know for sure? Probably not.

For bad behavior other than rulings (zero tolerance issues), our club directors and owners handle those problems themselves. On rare occasion, the club owner/director has sent someone home immediately and told the person not to come back for awhile. It depended on the offense as to how long the player was barred from the club. Usually at least a couple of weeks to three months. A couple of players have been barred forever, but this is rare and happens only after the player has been barred a couple times before for bad behavior.

I do not know if our club owners have written rules in place as I have never asked them. Didn't think it was any of my business, but I imagine they do. My opinion is that they should as a way to define how they run their club and what is expected of the members.
Dec. 5, 2016
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I agree with number one about Horn Lake. I have no knowledge about ACBL salaries, but I believe a number of bridge players are giving up the game, at least on the tournament level. It seems quite apparent when a national event draws 3000 tables less that what was predicted.

The complaints about this national are little different than so many of the other nationals. Costs are too high, the hotels are average at best, parking is always an issue, availability of affordable food is marginal, card fees are high, the playing cards in use are awful, rudeness toward hotel staff is rampant, and the list goes on.

Problem is, those in charge either don't care or pay no attention to the problems that are the same or similar. I was not at this national, nor do I attend nationals. The cost versus the benefit is just not worth it to me. I am just a rank and file member, and I don't make my living playing bridge, so my choice to avoid these tournaments does not matter much. But it seems to me that unless these problems can be resolved, nationals, regionals, and even sectionals may become a thing of the past. And yes, I have volunteered at many tournaments, and I have personally heard all of the complaints myself.
Dec. 5, 2016
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I am not familiar with this system but it seems to me the west hand does not follow what the system says. Whether is is legal or not is in the eyes of the beholder, on the directors.

Not knowing what the recommended defense is supposed to be, I would have bid two diamonds as the north hand, and south will take action as well. Perhaps make a cue bid of clubs to show a limit raise, jump to four diamonds if that is something their partnership does, whatever. One thing that would not have happened at my table is to let a four heart bid by west go quietly into the night. Double comes to mind or a five diamond bid, thinking it is a sacrifice and then be really happy when the bid makes.

Fun game, this bridge.
Nov. 16, 2016
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No, I don't.
Oct. 27, 2016
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I don't think you will lose a partner, but it seems to me this is something that should be discussed with partner so whatever is decided works for both of you. My agreement with my partners is if I pass, I can support any suit they bid but I literally have nothing and no clear preference.
Oct. 27, 2016
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With hand one, I pass. With hands two, three and four I bid one spade. I consider having a five card suit worthy of a bid. Unless someone is psyching, partner knows you can not have much. I do not play that passing means a willingness to play there however. If I pass, I really have nothing with flat distribution.
Oct. 26, 2016
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My partners and I play puppet stayman over two NT so I would bid three clubs hoping to find a five card heart suit, in which case I bid four hearts and hope for the best. If not, I bid three NT and still hope for the best. Hope springs eternal, right? Yes, I know three NT could be the right choice, but holding two doubletons, I like my chances at four hearts a little better if partner holds five hearts. (I don't know how to calculate odds so this is just my opinion.)
Oct. 22, 2016
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I play pretty much what Cornelia does but with one partner we use a two NT call as a help suit game try. Partner then lets me know what help he has in an outside suit if any. If no extra help then he signs off at three of the major.
Oct. 9, 2016
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I choose the announcement answer because if it is technically not a required alert per your OP, (I have no idea), I think you are doing the right thing anyway. It is an agreement you and partner have, so I think you should share the information.
Aug. 30, 2016
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I lived in Kansas City for thirty years and it was a great place to be except for the weather. You are right on about the barbecue. It is absolutely the best. I have never had better barbecue anywhere else, and that goes for the great state of Texas also. I lived in Dallas for 18 years as a child and teen. I have a good friend (from Fort Worth) who thinks the barbecue in Texas is the best. I keep telling him he is wrong, but try to convince a stubborn Texan of anything.

Great and funny article. Thanks for sharing it with us.
Aug. 17, 2016
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My exception would be if I was wide open in two suits. Then I would open the major and if partner bids one NT I would raise him to the two NT level expecting his points to cover my empty suits. Not saying this is right as the NT opener with 15-17 does show the point count right away. Just a matter of style.
Aug. 17, 2016
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Although I personally don't have a problem with the concept, I can understand why it would not be allowed in a sanctioned game. If all the mentees wanted to play the hand as declarer then the rules could maybe be bent a little as the hand would have the same declarer, but all the mentees probably don't want to play the hand. It is likely some feel they can learn just as much by being dummy and watching their mentor play. Since there are rules in place for sanctioned games, and switching declarers is not allowed, then it is what it is. I applaud your efforts in attracting new players to the game and it sounds like it is working. If this concept of switching declarers is something important enough to your newbies, then hold a non sanctioned game where you can be more flexible with the rules and see how many players would come. If collecting master points are a main focus along with the learning experience, then this won't work, but you could try it and see.
Aug. 16, 2016
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My question has nothing to do with Mr. Passel and his kindness, and I commend him for the choice he made. I realize that Peg is just the messenger so she may not know what happened at the table either.

After reading the post again, I can't tell if declarer stated her line of play. If she said the club jack is good, I will play it, and claim, then pulling the wrong card because of her visual problems should not have made a difference, right? I am just asking a technical question for my own clarification. Maybe the director that Peg has summoned will help?

We have a lady in our unit who has visual difficulties as well, and I have played with her a few times. We do the same thing for her by sorting her cards, calling out the bids, telling her what the dummy cards are, and each card as it is played. I find her amazing and she has dealt with her disability for years. We have another lady who is severely crippled and has poor use of her hands. We sort her cards for her as well and put them in a card rack. I believe we should all give back and help those who need help. Some day it could be me needing that help.
Aug. 11, 2016
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I don't plan to change anything but I also don't plan to open a NT with a stiff honor. Since it has been done by my opponents, and on rare occasions, my partners, I can see why the ACBL is now allowing it to be routine but it has to be announced along with NT point range if this is going to be part of your system agreement. You and your partners have to decide if you want to adopt this approach to your bidding style and what the benefits and risks could be. I prefer not to wind up in a five one suit when the stiff is a major because partner would always transfer me to that suit holding five bad of his own and a poor hand. For me, this is a thanks but no thanks. Maybe holding a stiff minor would be a bit easier as hopefully if partner transfers you to three of a minor he would hold at least six of them. Still, why have to worry about it.

And don't we all love those 4441 hands with the 19 to 20 point count range. Do you want to open two NT with a stiff? I have a partner who does and it never works out very well. Could just be our bad luck. Sometimes these bids can work, but they never seem to work for me.
Aug. 9, 2016
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