Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jane Eason
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 15 16 17 18
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I like your idea, Kevin. Can this type game be run for advanced players?
Nov. 11
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Nor to me.
Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
These lessons actually conflict with the game I run. But what a great idea for a limited game!!
Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jeff, the same players could attend either.
Nov. 10
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I should have said the lessons are opposite the 199er game. They are separate and in another room. I run the Open and the 199er games, but they are not my games. They belong to the club.
Nov. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The lessons do conflict with a 199er game.
Nov. 9
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
How many of you run two games simultaneously? This is a policy at our club.
Oct. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
1.Fairly easy, as several players live near-by. However, I run an open and a limited game each session I direct, and I try to avoid filling in unless we have a very small game with a long sit-out. If each game has an odd number of pairs, pairs from both groups often volunteer to move to the other section in order to avoid sit outs.
2.No.
3.NA
4.Our club rotates directions monthly, a policy I do not like because it leaves directors with fewer options.
PS.A director at our club suggested we provide sit-out pairs with a set of hands to use for practicing bidding—a great idea in m opinion.
Oct. 23
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Diamond finesse for me, too.
Oct. 22
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I think part of the problem is that some of our beginning classes rush beginners through the basics and students come out of these classes with no idea there is a difference between opener and responder or between opening and overcalling.

They learn Stayman in one or two lessons and two weeks later, they learn to open a week two bid and in another couple of weeks, 2C, strong, artificial and forcing. And they get these two 2-C bids mixed up. To them, 2C is 2C whether they are opening, responding, or overcalling.

I think sticking with all natural bids in the first eight or so lessons would help them build a stronger foundation. No Stayman, no Blackwood, no transfers and no artificial 2C openers, until they understand the difference between opener and responder and until they learn to invite game and accept an invitation.

Just last week, two players in my 0-199 game had the following auction:

1C Pass 1NT All Pass.

And while waiting for the other tables to finish, they asked how they could have reached game with their 12 hcpts opposite 17.
.
The 1C opener said she opened a short club (with Kxxxx AQx xx Kxx). Responder said she had then opened her 5-3-3-2 and 17 hcpts with 1NT.

Both have taken beginner lessons and one is now enrolled in a class where the students learn a convention a week. (They LOVE conventions.)
Oct. 22
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
By the way, before our club moved to a new location, I probably played an average of once or twice a month and directed twice a week, two games each. But, since the move, we have lost a good portion of our membership, and our club needs lots of help to pay the rent, so my husband played 22 sessions in August and I played 16. And I've never enjoyed club bridge more.
Sept. 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I play because I like taking tricks on offense and defense. I enjoy evaluating my hand. I like the languages of bidding and of signaling with the cards.
Sept. 2
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Y'all are the bomb!!
Aug. 31
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Thanks for all the suggestions. I will use many of them.
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jeff, thanks. Will do.
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ian, I considered teaching the LTC to beginners or intermediates, but wasn't sure if it would help or further confuse them—had no idea the LTC was used in miniBridge.
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
From an elementary ACBL lesson, I learned something I had never thought about.

Hand pattern percentages are equal to the frequency of suit divisions around the table.

For instance, a hand pattern such as 4-4-3-2 appears 21.55 % of the time. And each suit will divide into the four hands as 4-4-3-2, the same 21.55 % of the time.
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Jeff Lehman, how is the contract determined in minibridge?
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
When teaching a play such as a finesse, I shorten the hand to a few cards in one or two suits. First, they play AQ opposite xx. And when they get that, they get to play AQ and xx opposite xx and AQ. Then I give them a hand such as AQJ and xx opposite xxx and AK. At this point, some finesse successfully and then cash the ace.

Eventually, I build this into a 13-card hand full of finesses for kings. (I also teach 2nd low at this point, or lho will invariably fly with the King.)

To teach ducking to establish a long suit, I would first give AK5432 and 2 and 2 opposite 67 and AK3 and AK3 and have the table figure how to take 9 tricks with a 3-2 break in the long suit.
Aug. 30
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Duck.
Aug. 25
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 15 16 17 18
.

Bottom Home Top