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All comments by Jane Eason
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If I could change one thing about ACBL, I would eliminate any law concerning hesitations occurring in low-limit games, or possibly in all club games involving flight C (or maybe even flight B) players. In my opinion, this law is the source of too much ill will.

I would prefer that my unit and district have some variety in their tournament schedule. Every day, except Sunday, is like every other day, tourney after tourney, year after year. I also think they should at least attempt to have a low-limit game that would include our adult novices, instead of lumping them into games with up to 299 points.

If I could change one thing at our club, I would end the policy of running two games a week where players with over four thousand points can not play.
July 8
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My husband used to say about a weak suit in a no trump contract,

“A. They may not lead it.
B. They may lead it and shift.
C. They may block the suit.”

For this deal, I'll add:

D. Spades may break 4-4.
If one of those four things should occur, 3NT is odds on, but we wouldn't be in game.
June 20
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This may not be totally accurate, but it's close.

Members own Memphis, TN's largest club, M A Lightman Bridge Club, Inc. Dues are $50/year. This fee gives the approximate 250 members a $2 reduced rate/game, a couple of free games/year, plus a membership phone/address booklet with a monthly calendar for keeping track of their bridge dates.

Card fees are $8/day session for non-members, $6 for members. Night sessions are fifty cents higher. The night increase helps offset the cost of a security guard. A once-a-month youth game is free, and the fee for the once-a-week 99ers game is $5. ACBL charges for special games are tacked on to the entry fee.

Coffee and tea are furnished and soft drinks are available at seventy-five cents each.

Most directors furnish snacks. Two morning games serve lunch. An afternoon game has sandwiches and an evening game serves pizza.

Some directors are paid based on table count, starting at $45 for a 3-table game, and they get a $10 food allowance. Others own their games and pay rent to the club. A club manager is paid to run the business end, obtain sanctions, make reports to ACBL, purchase supplies, maintain the building, oversee directors and cleaning crew, and pay the bills.

When the building is available, teachers can use it at no charge. They can also furnish coffee and make copies of lessons at the club's expense.
June 18
Jane Eason edited this comment June 18
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I originally voted 980 for E-W.

But after reading Michael Rosenberg's explanations, I changed my vote to other.

I am not sure how the director should rule here because it seems to me that South should speak up and say that without the double, he would have saved in 7C, if that were the case. And there was no mention of his doing that in the OP.

Should the director have asked South if a pass by North would have affected his final call in any way? Or, is it up to South to volunteer that he would have bid 7C without his partner's double? Players are sometimes so relieved to have their score improved that they are reluctant to ask for more.
June 4
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Bridge Humor by Eddie Kantar is the funniest bridge book I have read and reread and reread.

Kantar's lessons and his big books on defense and bidding are great additions for the up and coming player.

I agree with Bill Jacobs that Seagrams quiz books for advancing players are wonderful. The hands are good, with great explanations of what a player should do and why
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June 4
Jane Eason edited this comment June 4
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I have the green hardback, 1972 edition.
June 3
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Have any of you read Fishheads by Bill Cole? I should have put it in, instead of the law book because it's a lot more fun!
June 3
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1. Bridge Humor by Eddie Kantar
2. Winning Defense by John Brown
3. Test Your Defense: Where the Points are Won, by Victor Mollo
4. Watson on the Play of the Hand by Louis H. Watson
5. The Modern Losing Trick Count by Ron Klinger
6. Snares and Swindles in Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel
7. To Bid or Not to Bid: The law of Total Tricks by Larry Cohen
8. Adventures in Card Play by Geza Ottlik and Hugh Kelsey
9. Bridge Squeezes Complete by Clyde Love
10.The Laws of Duplicate Bridge (ACBL)
June 3
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On my first day back to the club after having hand surgery, my novice kibitzer offered to arrange my hands. And he arranged a 3-0-7-3 hand, as 3-3-4-3, to see what would happen. What happened was a zero for our side.
May 28
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RIP, Margie.
May 28
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“Declarer conceded all the tricks”? Impossible.
May 14
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Ray,

Mentioning ethics in the poll was relevant to me because the player who reported his partner's revoke believed that he was required by ACBL's Active Ethics policy to expose the revoke. I also hoped folks who voted for options 1 or 3 would not be judged as having less than perfect ethics by those who did not choose those options.
April 16
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Peg,

I intended option 1 to be chosen by a player who follows the laws as he knows them and who plays an actively ethical game, but who believes he has a choice of whether or not to expose partner's revoke.

And I intended option 3 to be chosen by a player who follows the laws as he knows them and who plays an actively ethical game and who additionally believes that exposing partner's revoke is not a choice he is allowed to make.
April 16
Jane Eason edited this comment April 16
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I am of the school that believes “it is wrong to expose my partner's unintentional revoke, as I am required to do the best for my side, as long as I am following the law and practicing active ethics.”

I am also of the school that believes that what is right for me under the law and under active ethics may differ from what is right for you, when the laws clearly give us a choice.

Additional facts:

The tired, old guy who revoked is my husband, a Flight A player.

The opponents who failed to notice the revoke are sound, winning Flight B players.

Aside from the penalty paid, the revoke did not affect the outcome of the board.

My husband's partner, a skilled director, forgot his roll, but his rule was the one I would have made had I been called to the table.

The tricks actually taken by the defense were AK-A-A, one of which was later forfeited to satisfy the revoke penalty.

The side that did not notice a revoke that had no affect on the outcome of the deal was later awarded a trick that allowed them to make a doubled contract which could never have been made otherwise. So, those guys scored a top board unrelated to a bridge result, albeit a legal result.

Would these additional facts have influenced your vote?
April 15
Jane Eason edited this comment April 15
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It didn't occur to me that whether or not damage had occurred might affect one's answer to the poll. In this particular case, declarer scored a doubled 4-level contract on which they had only 9 tricks. The defense took four tricks via AK-A-A.
April 14
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If an honest person rolls a perfectly balanced honest die once, he has a one in six chance of any of six numbers occurring. If he rolls back to back numbers on that die in two rolls, on the third roll, he still has a one in six chance of rolling each of the six numbers because a die has no memory and each roll is independent of all other rolls. To me this problem is like the problem of, “Which hand is more likely: 13 spades, 13 diamonds, AK7, AQJ, AQ2, AK109?”
April 8
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Every roll of the die is independent of every other roll, so every time the die is cast, each of the six numbers on the die has an equal chance (1 in 6) of showing up. So if I choose 5 and 6, each of us players has an equal opportunity to win the game. I'd rather play a game where we roll two dice, and I can pick 7.

(Edited to add: I think strategy dictates that I pick 1-3 or 3-1 so I have an equal chance to win when either of my two opponents hits their first number.)
April 8
Jane Eason edited this comment April 8
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I let the result stand. North did say she was willing to play in 3H, but she did not say she was willing to defend 3S. I do not believe the UI was the reason for her bidding on, but I am guessing, as I was not there to inquire.
March 29
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To me, any action other than 3D is bizarre. I think I'll give my 0-master point group this hand to next month and see what they do. They all hesitate before every call, so the hesitation would make zero difference. I'll also give it to my Tues. night 99ers, with very few having anything close to 99 master points, and see how what they do.
March 24
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Way to go, Richard!
March 19
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