Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jane Eason
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I don't make anything of this player's attempt to rescue himself from what is probably a disastrous situation. I assume that if he were doubled in 2C, he would have bid 2D. I assume that with five spades, his partner would have run before the auction got back to him.
Sept. 19
Jane Eason edited this comment Sept. 19
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David, I think it's a good idea to point out to beginners that bluffing in bridge has to do with what card you play, and not with how you play it. The less experienced also need to know that body language is not a part of bridge communication.
Sept. 19
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Great hand, Jim! Is it the famous (or infamous) Mississippi Heart Hand?
Sept. 13
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Soloway jump shifts by an uph. Fit-showing jump shifts by a passed hand.
Sept. 13
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Randy, none played at our club.
Sept. 12
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My partner held AK10 tenth of hearts and out, vul vs not, and she was outbid.
Sept. 11
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1. The class consisted of new and returning players. The ACBL employees were all new, as were the assisted-living residents, and all but one child. The other students were split about 50-50.

2. Changing tables was suggested at the TAP accreditation seminar. I don't recall if Patty suggested that.

3. The helper at the children's table encouraged children who had signed up for her summer bridge camp to take LBIAD prior to camp. In the future, I would not mix seniors from assisted living and other adults at the same table. Otherwise, teaching to the three groups at one time worked well, thanks to the table helpers.

4. I recruited two teachers for follow-up classes with beginners.

5. I last ran LBIAD in 2016. Changes included (1) recruiting table helpers from intermediates I was teaching at the time, rather than from experienced players (2) having students bring their lunches (3) printing books for half the original price (4) moving the players around (5) spending little time on scoring.

6. After the first event, approximately sixteen people took beginning classes at our club from the two teachers I recruited. The seniors took classes from a teacher I sent to their facility. The kids attended bridge camp, as planned. And one couple arranged for private lessons from their table helper.

The following September, 2/3 of the ACBL employees took lessons from the E-Z bridge presenter.

I taught play of the hand and some bidding to two or three tables of players returning to bridge.
Sept. 10
Jane Eason edited this comment Sept. 10
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Brad, I love Mollo, but don't remember that hand. What book is it in? Or, do you have the hand?
Sept. 10
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Yes, Jeff. 18 of my LBIAD? students were ACBL employees, sent to learn the basics of the game, June, 2015. And they were given the day off with pay.

The second and third times I ran the event, I had eight or nine people who had responded to ads for the first event, but who could not attend at that time. I did not advertise or try to recruit new people for either of the latter events.

LBIAD? was good for our club, as we have retained enough players to play in our three to table, evening newbie game.

I don't recall how many people we actually retained from this event. My records not easily attainable, ut I have signed up 26 new ACBL players in the years since and some of the other teachers have signed some up. And we have retained some previous ACBL members.

We ended up with a couple of tables of party bridge players and a table or two in the assisted-living facility that sent six to eight people to the event.

Immediately after the event, we had a beginning teacher at night, one in the day, and one at the assisted-living facility. And each class had a couple of tables. And that in Sept of 2015, an ACBL employee taught the ACBL group E-Z Bridge at our club.

At least 5 children attended and I believe four went on that summer to a youth bridge camp. One now plays with his mom and they travel to tournaments.


Since this was our club's first attempt at restarting our novice program, there was not a game in place and getting one started was a struggle.

I learned a lot from that first time out. Most of the people who attended loved the course and made friends. And their only negative comment was that they didn't want to learn to score. As a result, I dropped most of the scoring information in the next two classes.

I had true negative feed back from a mother/daughter pair who said they resented being stuck with two players from an assisted living facility (that facility sent six to eight people), and I realized after that, that I should have moved folks around every thirty minutes to an hour. The mother/daughter pair was right under my nose and they were so sweet to the assisted living pair that I had no idea they were miserable. So, it pays to move people, even when they seem to be happy. And even if they say they like their table mates.

My best helpers were novices who felt no need to go beyond what I was teaching. Too many of the more experienced players were anxious to teach more than what was covered by LBIAD?. Some were interested in showing off their bridge knowledge and others wanted to be helpful, but they simply could not sit there as a hand holder.

As I mentioned earlier, I learned how to save 50% on the books for LBIAD?. The first 25 or so were printed for $10 or $12/ book. The second set of books cost $5/book, using an ACBL discount.

I've considered running the event again, but I am also considering teaching from “A Taste of Bridge”.
Sept. 10
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Randy, when I ran LBIAD?, I got a $500 grant, half of what our club spent. This came from an Education Department located in Canada, separate from ACBL headquarters.

I could have gotten a larger grant, had I had a larger advertising budget. But I distributed flyers, made on my computer, word of mouth and free announcements in the local newspaper and the shoppers' news. ACBL sent out emails to former members who had earned few or no points before letting their memberships lapse. And because the ACBL was aware of the event, they sent 18 of their employees. I had hoped to get 40 students and no more, but I ended up with 64 in the class.

Our club had let our novice program die and as the first time I/N coordinator, this was one of our first programs. So, the club board was very supportive and they gave me a budget of $1,000 for the event. Our members were supportive, as well, and I was able to get volunteers for all the tables and for registering students and for fixing our lunch. With the grant money, I paid the club back for half of the budget.

The cost of having books printed ran up the cost of the event. But I learned a lot about reducing the cost when I ran it a second time. For one thing, I saved on the binding the second time around, and for another, I learned to use an ACBL discount for the printing. I am not sure if out-of-the ACBL area people could use this discount, but it was available for me, as I live only a few miles from ACBL.

For my part, I kept the fees, which paid for the projector I purchased, the license for LBIA? and part of the cost of staying three extra days at the Nationals for training for LBIAD? and TAP. And it also helped pay for the free plays I bought each of my 20 some odd helpers.

The department that gave me the grant required follow up with students six months later and again a year later.
Sept. 10
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I won my stiff king when my rho held Ace 8th of spades opposite QJ10x. She led the SQ, and when my partner showed out, she shook her head, ducked to my king, and then showed her hand, claiming the rest. I said nothing at the time, and to this day wonder if she ever found out she had 12 trumps between the two hands.
Sept. 6
Jane Eason edited this comment Sept. 6
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Yes. Twice.

I played a 3-2 spade fit in 3S, redoubled, making, in a 1970's Life Master Women's pairs. The hand was first published in the “Daily Bulletin” and in the “ACBL Bridge Bulletin”, and was picked up by Truscott, for his “New York Times” bridge column. We were cold for 6D, and, if I remember correctly, one pair bid the slam.

I also once played a 3-2 diamond fit at the three level, down 1, when my partner passed me in a q-bid in a win-loss team game. The hand was cold for 4H, but we won an IMP because, at the other table, our opponents played in the same 3-2 fit at the 2 level, down 2.

At our table, the opponents led trumps at every opportunity and the last trump lead by lho picked up his partner's trump. At the other table, our opponents had just learned transfers and opener passed his partner's 2D transfer. That declarer was discouraged and gave up on the hand. And he did not get the benefit of the 4th round of trumps led by our team mates.

We won an IMP on the board and won the match by one IMP.
Sept. 6
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Glad to know I'm not in this boat alone.
Sept. 3
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“Instead of pretending that ANYONE can learn bridge, let's try turning it on its head. NOT anyone can learn bridge, but if you have the smarts and the drive to accept the challenge, know this, you will thank the day you discovered our game.”

So true.

Bridge is also a social game, a game that attracts like minds across the globe. And I think it's important to mention that, as well.

In marketing my fall beginner class, I'll use the above, plus the fact that like minds from all walks of life can play the game that attracted Warren Buffet and Bill Gates. And I believe that I can attract students who are more likely to stick with the game.
Sept. 2
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Thanks, Jeff, and thanks to you other contributors to this post for so many good ideas.

Except for teaching LBIAD? a few times, I have avoided beginner classes for years. And as the I/N Coordinator for my club, I recruited others to teach beginners, few of whom stuck with duplicate.

Teaching beginning classes was difficult because the material was unexciting. I lost way too many after a single set of lessons. And, with a goal of getting students into duplicate, I was discouraged that so many ended up playing party bridge and encouraging others from the class to join them in home games.

It was obvious that students who had played Whist or Spades before discovering bridge had a greater understanding of the game. And I planned to introduce my son to those games before teaching him bridge. Yet, I continued teaching beginning students bidding, with no part of the lecture aimed at play or defense and I continued losing them.

In the sixties, I began writing a bridge book for my students, with a format different from any I've seen to date, and I'm just fired up enough now to finish it. But based on your suggestion, Jeff, I will add to the beginning, a couple or three lessons of no trump play followed by no trump bidding and then use the same schedule for suit play.

I can hardly wait to start a fun and exciting beginner class late this fall.
Sept. 2
Jane Eason edited this comment Sept. 2
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Ray, thanks for your thoughtful reply.

In this case, the pair had no agreement as to the meaning of 4D. West thought transfers applied and East thought 4D was natural.

After the game, West said he never opens 1NT with a 5-card major and East said he was unaware of that fact.

I like the idea of polling equal level players, without West's narrative.
July 29
Jane Eason edited this comment July 29
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Okey dokey. “Do you agree with the ruling?”
July 29
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Please choose only one answer! lol. I don't know how I managed to ask for two choices!
July 29
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If I could change one thing about ACBL, I would eliminate any law concerning hesitations occurring in low-limit games, or possibly in all club games involving flight C (or maybe even flight B) players. In my opinion, this law is the source of too much ill will.

I would prefer that my unit and district have some variety in their tournament schedule. Every day, except Sunday, is like every other day, tourney after tourney, year after year. I also think they should at least attempt to have a low-limit game that would include our adult novices, instead of lumping them into games with up to 299 points.

If I could change one thing at our club, I would end the policy of running two games a week where players with over four thousand points can not play.
July 8
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My husband used to say about a weak suit in a no trump contract,

“A. They may not lead it.
B. They may lead it and shift.
C. They may block the suit.”

For this deal, I'll add:

D. Spades may break 4-4.
If one of those four things should occur, 3NT is odds on, but we wouldn't be in game.
June 20
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