Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Jane Eason
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Agree. That's what I intended.
July 3, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment July 3, 2017
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No. But if they need to charge extra fees when special equipment is used, or when monitors are paid, that's the way to go, imo. This cost would be shared by pros and non-pros.
July 3, 2017
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In the mid 1970's, ACBL required anyone who played for pay to pay $50 to resister as a pro. I don't remember any perks being offered, though. A few months later, when they discontinued that program, they gave no refund.
July 3, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment July 3, 2017
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I don't use the stop card because I can't remember to use it all of the time, which is my understanding of how it should be used.
July 3, 2017
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Interesting that we had over 10,000 in the first free practice and something like 7,700 in the second. It seems a lot of players were discouraged.
July 3, 2017
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Kit, I like your line of play (also chosen by Tom Townsend). And your analysis has converted me.
July 3, 2017
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Agree with Leo, and with John Uchida, in that it surely helps to be lucky. :)

In this first practice session, we use basic robots, so entrants do not get equal treatment by partners or opponents. And that is also true when we play against humans.

In the real event, where we play against the improved robots, we will have equal treatment by the bots in equal situations–same leads, etc.

If your line will squeeze your robot opponent, my identical bidding and identical line of play will squeeze my robot opponent. But you will see the robots are less likely to be squeezed than humans.

And this factor eliminates much of the luck found in F2F tournaments where some opponents are easy to pseudo squeeze, while others will attack your entries and break up your real squeeze when possible.

The bots will know early on to hold a guard like 9xx in a suit to keep his partner from being squeezed.

And just think, your partner is as good or bad as everyone else's.
July 2, 2017
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My husband and I play 3C as a general-direction, spade-game try.
July 2, 2017
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With a bye-stand and relay movement, when possible, we make a second set of boards, so there is no sharing.
July 2, 2017
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The instant games, which are ACBL paid-to-play games, use basic bots. Basic bots do not play like other basic bots when given the same situations.

You can bid exactly like the entire field, be the only declarer to get the killing lead, go down off the top and get a zero. This does not happen with advanced bots. Given the same auction, the advanced bots will make the same lead and defend identically given the same set of plays by declarer.
July 2, 2017
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Craig, if trumps broke 3-1 or 2-2, I'd just pull trumps and set up a diamond for the 12th trick. I'd go set with 6-2 spades and 4 hearts on my right or anytime 4 hearts were on my left.
July 2, 2017
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No problem if trumps break, so assume 4 trumps with rho.

SA, ruff a spade, cash a high heart and get the bad news that rho has four trumps. Club to CJ, ruff a second spade, three rounds of clubs, pitching two diamonds, ruff a diamond, trump to HQ, diamond, pitching spade as rho ruffs. Claim. Or ruff as rho pitches or follows. Claim.
July 2, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment July 2, 2017
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They signal udac, so I play the H4 at trick one.

Before this discussion, I would have led the DK, had I chosen to work on diamonds. But in the future I will lead the DJ, thanks to some of your good explanations.

(Edited out my last question–figured out the answer.)
July 1, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment July 1, 2017
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The bid asks about controls necessary for slam, with those controls being the four aces, voids, and the king and queen of trumps.
July 1, 2017
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I played in this event an hour or so ago, and, at that time, there were 3,300 entries.
July 1, 2017
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I like upside down attitude in all attitude situations and upside count on declarer's lead, with standard present count on the second and later plays of the suit. For count situations when partner leads, I prefer standard count because I can always read it, while trying to read upside down count on my lead is confusing. However, none of my current pds will agree to this method.
July 1, 2017
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Christopher Monsour, you asked, “What is NACB?” It's a typo! <blush>
June 30, 2017
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Looks to me that, double dummy, 4H is a make. In all cases, you set up clubs and keep an entry to dummy to cash them. I don't think you can make it if you win the diamond at trick one, though.

Duck a diamond at trick one. Say rho returns a diamond, win. Cash CA, ruff club, ruff diamond, cash HK, ruff a club. Cash HA, and lead a heart. Clubs are good and you have the spade K to get to dummy.

If rho wins and shifts to a low spade, play the SJ, forcing lho to win. If he wins and returns a spade, win the king, play CA, ruff club, HA, HK, ruff a club, give up a heart. Dummy has three good clubs and the DA for an entry. If he ducks the SJ, just set up clubs and give up a heart.

If rho shifts to the SQ, as someone suggested, you play small from hand and either win the king or, if lho wins the SA, he will either lead a spade or a diamond. If he wins the SA and leads a spade, win the SJ in hand. Now, cash CA, ruff club, ruff a diamond to dummy, cash HK, ruff a club, setting up the clubs, cash HA and give up a heart. lho has to lead a spade to dummy's king.

If rho wins the diamond at trick one and leads a trump, play the HA, CA, ruff a club, HK, ruff a club, give up a heart and you have the DA for an entry.
June 30, 2017
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The convention I most dislike is Lebensohl in response to a double of a weak-two bid.

And the non-conventional bid I most dislike is responding 2NT to a strong 2C opening. (The bots love this bid.)
June 28, 2017
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RIP, John Potter, a wonderful man and a wonderful bridge player. Saw him at a recent Nationals, for the first time in many years, and was so happy to have a chat. (Jane Knapp Eason)
June 28, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment June 28, 2017
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