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All comments by Jane Eason
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Uhoh. The word police are everywhere.
April 3, 2017
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Thanks to all of you at this point for taking time to give your thoughtful and insightful answers. I believe now that I was off the walls in my original thinking about what went on here. I will let the girls know that and let them know what I was concerned about in hopes they will understand that concept as well.
March 31, 2017
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Phil, what do you think they should be learning? (I'm not sure if it's I or they who should be learning…lol.)
March 31, 2017
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Thanks, Ed.
March 31, 2017
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Jim, thanks for your response. Suppose you want to explain this to your mentee and her partner–two people in whom you have a real interest.

The problem I am trying to find out about is not whether or not to ignore the situation. I really want to know how to look at it.

Would it be okay for you or me to pass in the identical auction in a tournament? And, if not, why not?

(Edited out a grammatical error.)
March 31, 2017
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Thanks.
March 31, 2017
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Phil,

Are you a director?

I was playing against my mentee and her regular partner, two people I am crazy about. Still, I did not want her to think it was okay for her partner to pass in this situation.

Later, I decided I could be very wrong about the way I was looking at it and I told them I would check with the folks on this site.

If you think it is not okay for responder to pass, please explain further why you think it is not okay and what should have been done.

My partner and I got most of the available match points on the deal, so the score is not relevant.
March 31, 2017
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Way to go, Richard! Congratulations on a spectacular showing for the whole tourney, and on your stepping-stone squeeze!!
March 21, 2017
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Thanks for your input, guys.
March 16, 2017
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Sorry I didn't make it clear, Alan, that this was a no trump contract with defenders having no black cards, the K having been played, and losing diamonds in dummy.
March 16, 2017
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I'd like to edit my previous comment to add that my hand was 4 clubs and 5 spades, and that the opponents had a 5-3 spade fit, but I don't see an edit button.
Jan. 30, 2017
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I also voted Other. And here're my points:

South's failure to double an alerted 2D followed by his failure to double the 5C response to Blackwood could have suggested to North that a heart lead was superior to a diamond lead.

Had the 2D bid been alerted, South could have doubled to show a good diamond holding. But he was denied that chance.

With no alert, his pass of what he believed to be a natural 2D was meaningless because he could have had a holding where it made sense to double an artificial 2D, but not the final contract.

Suppose that North-South had presented that defense, rather than (or along with) the defense that South may have bid 2H over an alerted 2D. Wouldn't the director have adjusted the score to 6H down one if he agreed with their take?

Suppose that the director realizes the points I'm making here at the time, but North South, in the excitement of the moment, does not get back into their bridge zone and work out for themselves that they were damaged in this way. Can the director base his rule on his knowledge of these facts, even if North South fails to point this out?

I think all the bases should be covered in such a situation and, to me, it seems more fair to give an average plus to North South and average minus to East West than to try to work out all the possible results and pick one based on the director's bridge knowledge (thinking about all directors here, and not the actual director in this case) or North South's skill in presenting their case in the heat of battle.
Jan. 27, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment Jan. 27, 2017
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My pick-up partner and I sat down against the 1-seed on the last round of an open pairs. We'd had a good and lucky game, and I felt sure we could win the event by simply avoiding a disaster. On the last board, relieved to have a clear-cut bid, I opened a club on a hand where those who had sorted their hands correctly opened a spade. Our opponents' spade game was doomed, while the field's 3NT was cold. This lucky accident propelled us to a win, as we beat this pair of national champions by one match point.
Jan. 27, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment Jan. 28, 2017
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Many, many years ago, playing on a pick-up, win-loss Swiss team, our side was cold for 3NT or 4H.

Partner opened 1NT. RHO bid an artificial 2D. And I bid 3D, which I intended as forcing. But partner passed, and we played our 3-2 fit.

3D was down one after the opponents led trumps at every opportunity, bumping their 12 and 13th trumps together.

Amazingly, at the other table, our opponents also played in their 3-2 diamond fit. The NT opener forgot their new convention, the Jacoby Transfer Bid, and he passed 2D.

Our team mates scored their trumps separately and when the smoke cleared, declarer was down 2.

We gained 2 IMPs on the board and won the match by 3.
Jan. 23, 2017
Jane Eason edited this comment Jan. 23, 2017
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Suppose the situation occurs where two players expose a key card at different tables in the same event. At one table, the law is enforced and the offender pays a costly penalty. At the other table, the law is ignored and the player suffers no penalty. Further suppose that the person against whom the penalty was waived wins the event, instead of being out of the money had the penalty been enforced.

In an attempt to be kind, the person who ignored the law determined the outcome of the event. The player who lost the event as a result of this “act of kindness” has suffered an injustice. And the player whose infraction was overlooked leaves with the opinion that future opponents who enforce the rules are unkind.

To me, it is a matter of ethics to call the director whenever an infraction such as a lead out of turn occurs. (A break in tempo is another matter, as it is not an infraction where one is required to call the director.)
Jan. 9, 2017
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Declarer loses the trick she conceded. She could easily have played a heart before running diamonds, as she has obviously miscounted diamonds. (By the way, it's my understanding that after play ceases, there is no longer a dummy.)
Dec. 9, 2016
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In the 60's or 70's, there was a bridge game with six suits, the two additional being Wheels and Rackets. And it was played with six players, three on each side.
Dec. 12, 2015
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Oops. This comment was responding to another post, so I deleted.
Dec. 12, 2015
Jane Eason edited this comment Dec. 12, 2015
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If random results are undesirable in certain contests, why not run them like par bridge? Folks get credit for bidding to the right spot, but the play and defense are compared with declarers in the best contract with the same lead.
Dec. 12, 2015
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As a group of us drove to our first tournament, the discussion turned to filling out convention cards. Back then a jump to 2NT over partner's opener was forcing, showing 13-15 hcp. One friend said to her partner that if either of them should open 1C, a jump to 3NT shows exactly 12 hcpts. She said someone at a party bridge game had taught her that bid and that it always worked, so they should play that way. I told them that what they were discussing was a private understanding and that they should write it on their card. Turns out, the director was called when an opponent picked up their CC and found the words “Private Understanding” on the back.
Dec. 12, 2015
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