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All comments by Jane Eason
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Except in a novice game, the comment, “Really?” is inexcusable.

I can't believe it was appropriate to treat this comment so lightly in a National event.

(Wayne, I just noticed you answered my request for a hand, as I was editing our that request. I had forgotten about the 1S bid, but after reading the next post, saw the real auction. Sorry about that. And thanks for complying)
Aug. 5
Jane Eason edited this comment Aug. 5
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Congratulations, Fred! You were a wonderful host, both at BBO and, earlier, at the Microsoft Zone, where I played daily, as jobanjo.
July 14
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My husband says Margaret Wagar was not doing well financially in her later years. And, once a year, Barry Crane would fly to Atlanta and pay her to play with him.

I didn't know Barry but I did play against him twice. The second time, he was playing in the qualifying round of an open pairs with Ron Anderson. And at the end of the round, I said, “Good luck”, as I left the table. Needless to say, Barry and Ron won the event. And, after the evening session, Barry found me, to thank me for wishing them good luck. He said he believed that contributed to their win.
May 15
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What if the killer had a motive unknown to the police? What if he remembered the crime, but lied and claimed he didn't remember it? What if the guy who left his cigarette butts in Barry Crane's car actually stole that car and abandoned it in the mountains?
May 11
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An interesting 2017 article about Barry Crane's life and death.

https://www.hourdetroit.com/community/who-killed-barry-crane/
May 10
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Brenda, I just reread your post and noticed that you have Bridge Sorter. We have Dealer4. Yet, both machines have problems distinguishing some spades from diamonds. I mentioned that our machine mixes up those aces. It also mixes up another two cards regularly, and I can't remember which it is, but I think it's the spade and diamond treys.
May 5
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3C is not comparable, as it does not show at least 3 spades.
May 4
Jane Eason edited this comment May 4
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If the offender chooses to bid 3S, his partner is barred from the auction because 3S is not a comparable call. It's a q-bid. (Oops. I misread your original point. If 2S was a mechanical error and the player was planning to q-bid, he is, of course, allowed to bid 3S without penalty.)
May 4
Jane Eason edited this comment May 4
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I recently took a course on this and I believe a comparable call must be a call that showed at least three spades and at most two hearts and a non-game going hand. And I don't see any call showing that.

Imo, the offender can choose any call he wants, and his partner will be barred for the remainder of the auction. And the result could be adjusted by the director if he thinks the offending side gained from the infraction. For instance, suppose the offenders play that double of 2S asks opener to bid his minor, or to pass if his second suit is spades. Now, if offender should double for penalties, holding long spades, something that he could only do because of the infraction, that score would be adjusted if offending side gained from it.
May 4
Jane Eason edited this comment May 4
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I use ACBL plastic cards and our machine often has trouble distinguishing between the spade ace and the diamond ace. This doesn't happen when I use non-plastic cards. What happens is the machine deals one of those aces and then when the other one shows up, it gives an error message saying that it is a duplicate card.
May 4
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Congratulations to you, Peg, and to the USA Team.
May 2
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Of course bridge is a game of logic. :) And I am a big fan of yours and of your teaching methods.

Still, I don't buy that one method of counting is superior to another, when we get the same totals for the 9-card fit, opener (19) and responder (14), and 33 total for the two hands. And we teach our students by showing them that ruffing in the short hand is the normal way to go and by having them play and replay hands to reinforce that.

Most important to me is to teach students to think in terms of tricks that come from shortness and from length and to evaluate hands beyond hcpts. I don't want my students to think that the hand you presented will produce a 24 point slam, when it's actually a 33 point slam.

Beginners and intermediates do learn to ruff in the shorter hand, but we also reteach our more advanced players to look for a cross-ruff that will produces 9 total trump tricks or to see that reversing the dummy will allow us to make extra trumps in the long hand or that we can set up dummy's side suit via a couple of ruffs in the long hand.
May 2
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Jeff,

When I took beginning lessons in the 1960's, my teacher, Nate Silverstein, in Memphis, TN, taught us to count dummy points once a good trump fit was found. We added 1 point to any trump support holding of Jxxx, Qxxx, or Kxxx, and counted a max of 4-points in the trump suit, no matter what honors we held. And, with 4-card support, we counted useful voids 5 and singletons 3. Doubletons were 1. We were also taught that aces counted 4 1/4 (suits and no trump) and to beware of giving unsupported queens and jacks their full value. We distinguished between distributional points and hcpts and talked about support points and total points when discussing suit bids.

We counted declarer's hand the same way, once a five-four fit was found. So, we would have counted dummy as 14 total points and declarer's hand as 19.

And the above is what I teach my students.

From ACOL, I took up the losing trick count in the 70's, and that counting method says these hands should normally produce 12 tricks. When I play, I use both methods.
May 1
Jane Eason edited this comment May 1
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The only comparable calls after a pass out of turn, at partner's turn to call, are calls that definitely limit the offender's hand to less than an opening bid. Say his pd opened 1D. He could bid 3D, playing inverted, because that would deny an opener. He could bid 2NT, if that were a limited bid, because, again, it would deny an opener. And he could bid 1NT, which denies an opener. And he could bid a weak jump shift. But he could not bid 1H or 1S or 2D, inverted, and unlimited, because these bids are not limited to less than an opening bid, and in each of these cases, he could possibly have an opening hand.

He can also make non-comparable calls, but his partner is silenced for the remainder of the auction. And the score is subject to being overturned.
April 2
Jane Eason edited this comment April 2
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Way to go, Richard! Congratulations to both for this win and for the 2nd place finish in the fast pairs.
April 2
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Playing against Ron Anderson and Tom Sanders, years ago, Ron opened a minor and I overcalled a heart. The auction proceeded, Pass, Pass, x, and I bid a spade with my 4-5 distribution. Tommy, holding six hearts, was sure that I had psyched and single-handedly put the hand in six hearts, which my partner, holding a singleton heart and an ace, doubled, knowing that I had a minimum of 5, at least reasonable, trumps. I would like to say that we all had a good laugh afterward, but that wasn't the case.
April 2
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Praying for your daughter, Frank.
March 29
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ACBL's site clearly states that we are required to wait 10 seconds after a skip bid.

Yet, one writer in an article in “The Bulletin” says 5 seconds is long enough because 10 seconds is a “lifetime”. And that same opinion has been stated and gone unchallenged numerous times in print.

When the attitude of those who speak for the ACBL is what it is, folks feel justified in ignoring the rules and regulations of the game. Waiting two or three seconds, or even five, is not complying with the rules.
March 28
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My husband and I had this very auction recently. He bid 3H, showing heart values, and a desire to play 3NT. Holding Jxx of spades, I bid 3S, hoping to play 3NT opposite a partial spade stopper. He interpreted the 3S bid as showing Ax and a desire to play 3NT from his side. How do you guys play a 3S bid here?
Feb. 7
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Congratulations, Curtis!
Jan. 19
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