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All comments by Jane Eason
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Dominic, I was not annoyed at the situation or at either of my two opponents, and I was definitely not condescending. And I want to point out that I did not call about a hesitation. This is what I said in my original post: “At this point, I called the director and told him the 4D bid had been announced as a splinter.” There was never a mention to the director or to either opponent about a hesitation. I only mentioned it in the post to show that rho was considering another call at this point and if that call was to be based on what was possibly UI, I thought it was only fair for her to understand the situation and her obligations.
Dec. 2, 2018
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John, thanks for your input.

As I have said in previous responses, I was not calling because of a hesitation. In fact, in almost 60 years of playing, I have never once called on a hesitation in a club game. And I never will, even against strong opponents.

I called at this time because the announcement that 4D was a splinter gave rho UI. And seeing that rho was considering a call over 4H, I felt that UI should be explained to my rho.

The following statement by you is confusing because I think I did exactly what this statement says should be done.

“Note that the calling the TD is done BEFORE an opponent has (possibly) made use of the UI. It is designed to prevent such (ab)usage.”
Dec. 2, 2018
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To answer your question, Richard, we play in club games for two reasons. A. My husband will not play online. B. We both like seeing our friends.
Dec. 2, 2018
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Michael, thank you for your reply. To answer your question, “How did you become aware of the fact that 4♦ wasn't a splinter?” I had no way of knowing for sure that 4D was not a splinter, but rho seemed worried. I was calling about the announcement, because it gave her information that she might possibly use at this point. And I believed I knew her well enough to think she wouldn't understand UI unless it was explained to her.

I, too, am a club director. And I don't recall reading that there is a time frame within which the director should be called to address an infraction such as an improper announcement.
Dec. 2, 2018
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Francis, thank you for your input and your insight. To answer your question, “What did you expect the TD to do?”, I actually expected him to explain to my rho, who was thinking of bidding, that she had unauthorized information. Period. I did not realize that I had only the moment the announcement was made to call the director regarding that infraction. I would not have called, had there been an alert.
Dec. 2, 2018
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I was once leading winners from my hand in a 5D contract with no winning play other than miss-defense by the opponents. Dummy had tricks that I couldn't reach and I needed the opps to guard that suit. They were discarding slowly and lho said it was rude for me to play for an over trick because he had to catch a train back to NY. I really didn't know how to respond, but I called the director and told him what lho said and the director said, “She has every right to play for an overtrick”. I made the contract.
Dec. 2, 2018
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Another question regarding fast pairs. Suppose a table starts a board late and is bidding when the round is called. Should the director take the board away? Assign a penalty, or penalties, and let play continue, thus putting two tables behind for the next round? Give a hospitality break so other tables will not be a board behind on the next round? Should there be a time after which no table can start a new board?
Oct. 24, 2018
Jane Eason edited this comment Oct. 24, 2018
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deleted
Oct. 22, 2018
Jane Eason edited this comment Oct. 22, 2018
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Yes, a cute ending!! After your first six tricks, you have a count on the hand and know rho is all black, lho all red.
Oct. 22, 2018
Jane Eason edited this comment Oct. 22, 2018
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Adjusted Score, Average Minus, Law 12. C. 2.(a).
Oct. 22, 2018
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Look at the trick before playing to it.
Oct. 22, 2018
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Oops! Misspelled Bayone. Is there an edit button somewhere around here?
Oct. 17, 2018
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Interesting, Steve. Thanks for the suggestion.
Oct. 9, 2018
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By the way, when I asked for interesting hands, a couple of people mentioned two of Pavlicek's hands, where 3S and 3NT could be made by both directions.

I think my students would enjoy seeing them, whether or not they would be suitable for my intermediate lessons. Do any of you know these hands?
Oct. 9, 2018
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ACBL has a collection of celebrity lessons on their website. One of my favorites shows defenders how to count distribution on a hand, using clues from the bidding and play, before playing to the first trick.

I've enjoyed using this hand for a mini lesson before a game and as part of a class on defense. The lesson is called Aunt Lucy (Hand Patterns) and it was constructed by Ken Monzingo.

http://web2.acbl.org/documentLibrary/teachers/celebritylessons/handpatternsrevised.pdf
Oct. 9, 2018
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I agree, Jeff.
Oct. 9, 2018
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I'm currently teaching an intermediate class on play and bidding. We are working on thinking about one defenders' hand, with clues from the bidding or play. It is easy to construct hands where the declarer has to pay attention to one opponent's distribution in order to play a suit such as AQ98 opposite K1076 correctly for four tricks. The distribution will be wild enough for the declarer to succeed with almost no effort outside of paying close attention because the auction will have someone bidding two suits or, with no bidding, rho will show out of the suit led, immediately placing seven small cards in that suit on their left. And opening leader will also have another clue, such as a side 4-card suit, so that the play should not be hard if they know what information they have gleaned after a three or four more plays. All they have to do is postpone play in the key suit.
Oct. 9, 2018
Jane Eason edited this comment Oct. 9, 2018
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I like the hand-sharing idea. I recently tried to post a request for interesting hands on this forum, but the post ended up on the open forum, where I got some interesting hands to use in my current class and for future more advanced ones.
If a hand could be copyrighted, who could copyright it?
For instance, someone makes a hand on a squeeze. It is a hand that was dealt by one of his opponents in a team game. And it is later published in a bridge column.
Who owns the hand? The dealer, who created it? The person who played it? The person who published it? The person who invented the play that made the hand interesting enough to be published?
Oct. 8, 2018
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Jeff, it's not off the table. I'm considering teaching a Taste of Bridge in two evenings, or LBIAD, probably in January.
Oct. 2, 2018
Jane Eason edited this comment Oct. 2, 2018
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Agree. Good partnership skills are among the most important concepts we teach.
Oct. 2, 2018
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