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All comments by Jeff Sapire
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I agree with all 3 comments above. A friend who is not on Bridgewinners asked me to post this, to settle an argument . (He wasn't satisfied with my opinion). The vote so far, 36-0, is pretty much what I expected.
May 1
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Thanks Steve and Peg - corrected now.
April 15
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So 33.2 deals with MPs (Master Points)eligibility, and 33.3 states that MP eligibility and the right to be a title-holder are one and the same.

I was under the impression that the American majors are either the same, or very similar - but I'm not sure.
March 19
Jeff Sapire edited this comment March 19
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Steve, apologies, but I simply copied and pasted. I did realise it would be difficult to read.

Thanks very much for setting it out with paragraphs.
March 19
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In the 70's, British Bridge Magazine had a column called Cui Culpa? (who's to blame) - conducted by Bill Pencharz.
Dec. 12, 2019
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Dave, thanks for mentioning this. I've just hauled out 1956 and read the article. Most interesting - and Morrow says that “this variation in the Blackwood Convention was invented by a Dallas, Texas, bridge expert by the name of Oswald Jacoby in a book he wrote for the Four Aces - some 20-odd years ago when five-suit bridge came to America from England (That game did not long survive).”
Oct. 26, 2019
Jeff Sapire edited this comment Oct. 26, 2019
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Maybe your memory isn't too bad.
In 1969 the Blue Club book (by Benito Garozzo and Leon Yallouze) appeared, and in the same year The Italian Blue Team Bridge book was also published (by Benito Garozzo and Pietro Forquet). In this book, it seems that ordinary Blackwood was used. On page 146 there's a response of 5 to 4NT with A and A (so they weren't using RMC or CRO, which were the two options in Roman Blackwood).
Oct. 25, 2019
Jeff Sapire edited this comment Oct. 25, 2019
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Avon, in my copy of the Blue Club (first published 1969) by Benito Garozzo and Leon Yallouze (adapted by Terence Reese):-

Page 166. B. BLACKWOOD 4NT AND 5NT
We use conventional Blackwood in only two situations:
1) When there is a JUMP to 4NT
2) When the bid occurs on the FIRST or SECOND ROUND:

Our responses are not those of traditional Blackwood. They are:
5 1 or 4 Aces
5 0 or 3 Aces

To show 2 Aces we enter the territory of Roman Blackwood:
5 2 of the same Rank
5 2 Mixed ( and or and )
5NT 2 of the same Colour
Oct. 24, 2019
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In BB; Italy v Norway, an Italian pair also went wrong.
On the lead of the 9, declarer played the ace, north following with the 6. Declarer drew 2 rounds of trumps as north played 2 then 9. When declarer next ran the J, north played the 3. On winning the K, south switched to the 9!
I have no idea what signals the Italians were playing.
Sept. 23, 2019
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Someone pointed out a very clever and deceptive play that west could have made, which was almost sure to fool declarer.

When a heart was played to dummy's 9, he should have won with the queen, not the 10! That would have been a great defensive play.
Aug. 22, 2019
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Thanks Giles.
Somehow it didn't occur to me to try that before - really silly!
Aug. 22, 2019
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From ‘The Complete Book on Takeout Doubles’ by Mike Lawrence.

“(page 68) WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOU PASS AND DOUBLE WHEN RHO REBIDS A NEW SUIT?
(1) P (1) P
(1) Dbl?

Don't wait up for this one. I mention the possibility only because if I didn't, someone might think I overlooked it. In theory, you are making a takeout double of spades, showing the other three suits, including clubs and hearts. You could have 8 A873 KQ106 AJ74

Fortunately, you are unlikely to hear this sequence. If it does occur, though, this is what it shows.”
Aug. 14, 2019
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Quite right about the timing of the play. GIB says that declarer must finesse the before playing a . Of course this is double dummy stuff.
July 28, 2019
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Good to know, thanks Ray. But I'm sure it's not just me who didn't know this about Keith.
June 13, 2019
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A great post, but I'm still none the wiser as to what the actual Law is.
Perhaps a leading TD could clarify this most important issue.
June 12, 2019
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Andy, your post ranks about 498th on my list of comments to be considered thoughtworthy.
May 12, 2019
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Thanks all for the feedback so far.
It seems to me the time has come for the Bridge Authorities to implement some standardised Regulations regarding the use of Bridgemates.
May 12, 2019
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And watch Gromov - he keeps a close eye on what Nunes is doing with his scorecard, and then he turns towards Fantoni, who is clearly looking in the direction of the scorecard. It's almost as if Gromov catches him out (21:02), as Fantoni makes very fast eye contact with Gromov, then moves his head and eyes further to his right, and then shifts in his chair. Gromov then looks back in the direction of Nunes' scorecard.

Seems to me that Gromov was a bit suspicious and/or uncomfortable with what was going on, but we would need to ask him to know more.
May 11, 2019
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Doug, you wrote MM twice; just a typo, but should be FF.
Thanks for the analysis - good spotting.
May 4, 2019
Jeff Sapire edited this comment May 4, 2019
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I have don't have a copy of their Convention Card handy, but I recall that some years' ago, Meckwell wrote ‘frequent upgrades, no downgrades.’ (I would imagine under: System Summary; General approach and style).
So they thought it was worth uttering.
March 3, 2019
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