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All comments by Jeffrey Rothstein
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Doug Widman who also frequented the Fleahouse says it was Najdorf
Oct. 9
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment Oct. 9
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Harold was a low keyed expert level player who I knew casually forever. During the past few years we socialized and played on a few teams together. There is at least one story online which includes Harold in the 1960's at the NY
Chess and Checker Club (AKA Fleahouse and New York Academy of Chess and Checkers) where I spent a little time in my youth. http://www.anusha.com/fleahous.htm Harold is another character I will miss.
Oct. 7
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Agree but hearts or diamonds are both possible to produce nine tricks. 3H will likely make 3Nt impossible to reach. Pard may pass 3H even if forcing.
Oct. 7
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3NT assuming 3H is forward going but not forcing. Change the diamonds to xx, x or something like that then 3H is clear.
Oct. 7
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In the early 70's I picked up something like xxx, xx, x, KQTxxxx in a regional pairs: Pass, Pass to me so I bid the obvious 1NT: Pass, 2C, Pass Pass Pass with Judy Tucker in the passout seat with a puzzled look at her insane opponent. Down 1 for total top.

These psyches are not part of my adult repertoire.
March 29
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Richard had a math degree. In the 60's and 70's he worked for a defense contractor as a programmer while pursuing his hobby as a gambler evenings at harness tracks eventually graduating to a full time gambler. At the harness track Richie was known as “the hawk” for his ability to discover smart money and combine this with his awesome mathematical analysis. Richie remains the most unusual character in my life. Our paths diverged in the early 70's but we would catch up at bridge tournaments. I will miss the personal contact.
Feb. 10
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Opening leader is required to lead face down allowing questions from the passout position.

Unless ACBL rules have changed it is a violation to ask questions in the passout seat unless an explanation is necessary for a possible call other than pass. A director should be called any time a passout player asks a question.

I do not always call a director when the rule is violated at my table but my estimation of any passout player asking questions drops.

Passout players sometimes say “lead face down please” so they can ask questions. This is another violation alerting partner something may be unclear. This is another indication the passout player does not know or understand the rules.
May 30, 2018
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment May 30, 2018
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Al Roth suggested balanced with four Queens.
Nov. 23, 2017
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try 501C(7) - probably the correct non-profit category. The Cavendish Club in Manhattan was a non-profit member owned club for decades. I was the club accountant for the last ten years of the club's existence.
Oct. 4, 2015
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment Oct. 4, 2015
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Last huff and clarification:

I believe card play should always be in real time. I believe bidding should probably be in real time.

The nature of the game remains intact even with 1/2 of the table in a different room.

The table presence I object to is trying to read one's opponents through their body language or tempo as Reese suggested.
Sept. 19, 2015
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment Sept. 20, 2015
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My original post was aimed at debunking the concept that table presence is an important part of the game. I referred to Jeff only because he was the highest level player who stated somewhere that table presence was an important factor. Many others stated the same. I disagree.
Sept. 19, 2015
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A strong case was made for “reading opponents” by JM. In all my years playing and reading about bridge I do not recall any articles about reading opponents except one by Terence Reese where he led J from KQJ in his hand towards Axx in dummy to “read” his opponent's reaction for the purpose of finding another Q on the same hand when he led the J from KJT towards Axx in dummy.

I would like to see Jeff M write some articles about reading his opponents - or anyone else who can educate us.

I rarely get to finals in major events but I would welcome the suggestions which are the subject of this thread.
Sept. 18, 2015
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment Sept. 18, 2015
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I played rubber with Barbara for many years at both the Cavendish and Mayfair clubs in Manhattan. I guarantee Barbara was not a “golden retriever” at bridge. I do not recall Barbara ever doing anything ridiculous. In fact Barbara was very solid as a partner an opponent. I can not imagine what Carl's comments are based on.
Aug. 29, 2015
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deleted
Aug. 3, 2014
Jeffrey Rothstein edited this comment Aug. 3, 2014
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I answered “a few would pass” recalling encounters against you. I always enjoy the interesting auctions generated when we oppose.

Roth would open 1 minor with 13 HCPs because he had a descriptive and limiting rebid of 1NT available. 14 HCPs was his minimum for 5/3/3/2 major suit openings partly because the three card minor rebid with 13HCPs seemed wrong.

Al would have opened this hand 1D.
Aug. 20, 2013
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Cheaters will find a way until technology advances so that all tables play the same hands simultanously. Possibly cheaters will find ways even in that environment.
Dec. 9, 2012
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Partner's 4S caused the problem. 4C shold have been his bid.
Sept. 2, 2012
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Will never understand bypassing a six card suit to bid a five card suit.
Sept. 2, 2012
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The auction continued pass, pass 3D, pass, pass, X, pass, pass pass.


My hand was: xxx, AKxx, xxx, Axx. Xing may be a poor choice but continuing to 3S when partner did not open 2S seemed wrong. Pass would be prudent by me as partner passed originally.

The rest of the auction is of no interest to me nor is placing blame. I was just curious how many players would consider introducing a five card suit with a side six card suit.

As Bob H pointed out any vulnerable bid in balancing position with 7 HCPs must send shivers down many players spines. MPs is a strange game.
Aug. 28, 2012
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My partner bid 2S which is the majority choice. I was astounded because 2S eliminates clubs while 3C allows an accurate description when spades are bid next. The conservative pass is the only call other than 3C which appeals to my somewhat conservative views.
Aug. 28, 2012
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