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All comments by Joe Veal
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Ah yes, another example of the Bridge World's death hand with the typical results(some people decide to be honest and bid 3C while others said a prayer(please do not raise or 1430) and bid 2H)…
May 4, 2019
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To David Caprera, I get your viewpoint but be honest, how important is the 1st day of the BRQ? I apologize for the rudeness of the question, but doesn't the carryover get decimated after day 2 and day 3? For experienced players like yourself, Day 1 is a padding day where the known players and pairs(professional or not) rack up 55+ percent scorers over the less experienced pairs to get as high a carryover as possible. These players rarely have to worry about qualification for the next day. For players like yourself, the BRQ does not really start until day 2 where there are fewer easy pairs to get great boards.

To Josh Sher, I agree. My view(explained in previous thread) is that the drop-ins get 0 carryover. If one does the math, that pair will have to have a good day to make the finals(about 55 percent average) or a better day to compete for the win(about 58 percent or better average). That is not very easy when one has just played a qualifying Swiss and KO matches(ie Soloway KO) and now has to adjust to another form of scoring against a tougher field.
April 25, 2019
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I support Max's proposal even though I and my potential partnerships would fall in the lower quadrant of participants in the BRP's with 2 conditions. One, these pairs can only drop-in into day 2 of this event not day 3. If one allows pairs to drop in on day 3, the charge levied by Moese/Miles of elitism has a strong argument. Also, it cheapens the platinum points earned at the events. For those who do not know, if one makes the final day of the BRP's, they accrue Platinum points regardless on how they do on day 3. . If one gets 50 of these in a continuous 3 year period, they qualify for the Platinum Pairs. I strongly object to giving these points out for free just because they made another event's QF or SF. Two, these pairs get ZERO carryover. In my opinion, if a pair wants carryover they play in the event on day 1 and suffer like everybody else.

What people do not realize is that the drop-in pairs will have some big disadvantages in dropping in especially if this pair has the usual aspiration of a top finish. One, they do not get the luxury of a easier day 1 at the BRP to pad their stats and create as big of a carryover as possible to negate the big sea change of skill level. Two, they have to switch their strategies from an IMPs standpoint to a MP standpoint being at the bottom of the leaderboard. Three, with no carryover, mediocre bridge(aka averaging around 50 percent on day 2) will get you bounced from the event before even seeing day 3.

Also, the argument that these pairs make it harder for lesser pairs to have big results or to even qualify does not wash. BRP is a national championship event(NABC+). When I began playing this wonderful game, the BRP was the premier pair event at the NABC's. My partner and I went to an NABC with the purpose of playing in the BRP. We wanted to know what the gap was between the pros and players like ourselves. We were bounced in day 1 but I never forgot how much fun it was to play the best. Things have changed since that point. Platinum Pairs is the big pair event in NABC land and the BRP has lost a bit of that luster. From that perspective, ACBL should be doing everything possible to make sure that the best players and pairs are playing in their flagship events not catering to the final 8 pairs averaging around 50 percent who are on the cut line in day 1 or day 2 or having a concurrent national championship event like the Soloway KO. In this way, the BRP can keep its luster as a premier pair event and allow the Soloway its space to grow as the new event on the ACBL calendar.
April 21, 2019
Joe Veal edited this comment April 21, 2019
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This has been an entertaining NABC and I am not even there. You have the Platinum Pairs appeal. From my reading of the old Appeal books, Zia hasn't been involved in one of those since the 80's. If one thought the Vanderbilt was going to be appeal free, one is sadly mistaken. Has anybody heard of a double appeal? I am not going discuss the merits of the cases just when there is a close finish in a pair event or a round in a KO, arguments tend to fly. For those who screen saved Fredin's post, please PM me. I am not sure I want to be a TD at this event.
March 29, 2019
Joe Veal edited this comment March 29, 2019
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Chess and bridge are completely different games. Chess is a game of perfect information while bridge is not. There is one skill that is mandatory for becoming a world class bridge player(and world class poker player) that is not required in chess: table presence. Table presence is not something that can be quantified in a computer engine but it is the human ability to detect verbal and nonverbal clues from the opponent's mannerisms that would lead a person to make a correct decision every single time. It occurs many times when one has to guess a card or two to make a contract.Please note that there is the math and one must learn the odds. One can program a robot to be a excellent mechanic(strong bidding system, sound defender, and textbook declarer based on knowing the mathematical odds) but they will be restricted to those same mathematical constraints unlike the professional bridge player.
March 24, 2019
Joe Veal edited this comment March 24, 2019
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To Matthew, I want to congratulate you on your accomplishment. I know of 3 players in my local area(1 deceased) who have over 10,000 masterpoints that have no NABC title. You have achieved the hardest obstacle to GLM status. All you have to do is get the 7600 points. As far as the change in the rules, I do not think it is necessary but if it happened to me, I would see it as a high compliment of my abilities regardless of the actual truth.
March 24, 2019
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Congratulations to the qualifiers. To denote the strength of this hallowed event, it is not just the people who have survived to this point but the quality pairs that have just been eliminated.
March 24, 2019
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To Eric Sieg, I am talking about after the X of 4S not before the X double. Also, if they are not playing XX after the takeout X as values, they would have used XX to show clubs or a 1NT call to show clubs if they are using transfers or Cappelletti over 1 of a Major/Double.
March 16, 2019
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A few things. One, there is opening light but South's hand does not qualify. It appears that there is some funny business(aka South can open anything other than 1C and North does nothing with a clear XX). I would have reported it to the people of BBO and had their hand histories tracked for these “amazing” circumstances. I am willing to bet that there is a history of this stuff with this pair.
March 16, 2019
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Paul, there are a bunch of issues with this auction. First, I loathe 2NT as a balanced positive because it takes up too much space and wrong sides the NT game and slam auctions. To be honest, I love it when I have a partnership that allows that sequence of 2C-2NT to not exist.

The auction should begin 2C-2D-2S-3S(Extras) which will allow the strong hand to either cuebid or RKC. There are those who even use Serious/Non Serious 3NT to even further define the cuebids in this sequence.

Second, I do not believe that 4NT is RKC by you after your auction. It is quantative at this point. As Rosenberg points out, 4C would be a cue agreeing spades as trump with slam interest allowing the strong hand to take over the auction.

Finally, I have a explanation for your partner's bids. He/she took your 4NT bid as natural, he bid his second suit(5C) as an acceptance of your slam try and declined your grand slam try of 5D showing some sort of diamond control with 6C. His fault in this auction is probably not cueing his probable heart control with 5H.
Feb. 25, 2019
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The exact auction of 2C-3D-3S is my reason for bidding 2D. I want to find our heart game. slam, or grand slam with the good hand up.
Feb. 24, 2019
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Jeff Lehman, please look at the original Brogeland post on BW when he accused Fisher/Schwartz of wrongdoing. He had no proof at that time. Brogeland was later vindicated but he was not sanctioned by BW for the unsubstantiated allegations. BTW, I found the board and the “offending” pair. For those who wish to know, PM me.
Nov. 25, 2018
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I agree with Mike Edwards.
Aug. 6, 2018
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I agree with Geoff than the examination of 1 board during an INCREDIBLE duel is absurd. For me, I enjoyed the match.
May 25, 2018
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Let's see 4D is twice flawed. I will never get my partner to believe that I have this good of a spade fit after 2H call. 2NT is my only option.
May 13, 2018
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Very cool!
May 8, 2018
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Hakan makes a excellent point which coincides with my choices. My current occupation is a elementary/ middle school scholastic chess coach/tudor for the Oklahoma City/Edmond area. I run 2 elementary school programs in the public schools and 1 homeschool program and I have about 20 to 25 private students. The ironic thing is that I would drop this activity and teach bridge if bridge got their act together and started to have elementary bridge programs with competitions geared to elementary and middle school kids at the state and national level besides Youth NABC's.
May 3, 2018
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Before we start getting into what it was like in the “olden” days, my view is very simple. Very light openers at favorable vulnerability in 3rd seat/psyches/opening 1NT with a singleton have been around since the beginning of bridge. If one tries to legislate it, one is slowly turning the game from an art to a dull science. These tactics are hit and miss because it is a gamble that can get burned 3 different ways. The partner may get them too high or double something that makes. Also, the light opener may bump the opponents out of a game that would go down if they were silent. From my experiences, when stronger players used these tactics against me; I considered it a great compliment because they took off the gloves and gave me no quarter. I am glad to see a pro like Compton expound his true views on this subject because it is the aqua vitae of bridge.
April 30, 2018
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I disagree with Jay on this one. It is a pretty clear pass. I am curious, Oren, what happened at the table. Did South find the magical 2S call, hit pard with the right 8, find game and win a match?
April 25, 2018
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I agree with Craig with 1 addendum. I want to congratulate my RHO for making that double so I do not have to bid 2H.
April 18, 2018
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