Join Bridge Winners
All comments by Joel Wooldridge
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I just want to say that I also read the original posting. It presents damning evidence against one player absolutely. However, it also makes wild allegations that this one player's bridge behavior is indicative of his nation of countrymen. It also elaborates that the directors were in on it. Now, the first part I can get behind. Bridge is bridge, and anyone w/some sense can see the inequity of what happened at the table. However, the rest of it was just unsubstantiated non-sense, and extremely offensive to countrymen and directors alike.

This second part I'm going to include for people who don't believe in the directing staff. I was given the poll for the hand in question. I, whether you believe me or not, had NO prior knowledge of who was involved. I said that the bid was either 3d or 3nt. If they had asked me what I thought of 3s, I would have said absolutely not (they failed to ask that question). So the directing staff may have not been perfect, but they were attempting to do their job in an unbiased way. Take what you will from this, I'm offering it freely. I don't usually log into this website, but it was brought to my attention what was said, so I'm just answering here to give a little clarity to some of what was talked about. I'm not planning on continuing this post.
March 29
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I’m curious. Is there a way to show a courtesy raise of diamonds? Maybe 3d over 1s? Probably bidding 3d after 2c.
July 27, 2018
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In standard, a 3c bid can be based on a diamond 1 suiter. I’ll convince my partner i have diamonds when i bid them over their clubs
July 27, 2018
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I love bidding 2h w/this hand type in 3rd. The last thing i want to do is have to play 3h opposite partner’s maximum passed hand w/2 card support.
July 26, 2018
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I think kit is extrapolating from backgammon, where you should use the cube in situations where they aren’t sure if they should take it (as opposed to clear accept or clear drop).
July 24, 2018
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It became forcing pass when they passed the 5d bid.
July 24, 2018
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I play this double as values-penalty. A void bids 4nt instead.
July 24, 2018
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This looks a lot like a hand i held recently where i bid 2h, and the other table bid 3d. 3d was more successful, so i’m voting 3d this time around :)
July 24, 2018
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I suppose that's true. Ok, fair point
July 20, 2018
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playing ace of diamonds at trick 3 by east looks wrong. If declarer's hand were Jx xx KQx AKJTxx, you'd be allowing a make (declarer unblocks the queen, wins the jack on the 2nd round, club hook, heart to the jack). 3rd spade looks like the safest option.
July 20, 2018
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I don't think playing pass of 5d as non-forcing is a good idea (why I voted other). I think north might pass the 5d bid around to partner (forcing), and then sit a double if they make it (which south should do). If you must play pass as non-forcing, I think north should double and lead trump.
July 20, 2018
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I like this line of play nearly as much as my first idea, which also might have merit (see what you think). Ruff spade, HAK, cash 1 high diamond from hand, ruff a heart high if lho follows. Assuming rho shows out on 3rd heart, play a low diamond off the table to the 9 if rho follows. If it loses to the ten, try the club finesse at the end. This has the advantage of combining the two most likely scenarios of diamonds 1-3 after hearts 4-2, and club queen onside. It fails by comparison to the assume spades 5-5 line when lho has 5-4-2-2 with both diamond ten and club queen (which is a big enough draw back if you assume spades 5-5. My line might be right if you aren't willing to assume 5-5 spades. Maybe LHO has JTxxxx QJxx x xx).
July 20, 2018
Joel Wooldridge edited this comment July 20, 2018
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In imps, I like redouble by either hand to play, and pass is doubt (in the passout, you must run if you don't want to play it there). I've made 3nt xx'd too many times to want to change this agreement. This means opener might have to choose between xx or pass with a single stopper. Choose wisely :) In matchpoints, playing xx as doubt makes sense, since making 3nt x'd is usually a very good score anyhow.
July 20, 2018
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I think the way to calculate these kind of problems is by remaining cards. Admittedly, I'm unsure if I'm doing this properly. My guess is that the odds of someone having 4 diamonds and 3 spades is 6/14 (their 6 remaining cards versus their partner's 8 remaining cards) which is 42%. The odds of someone having 5 diamonds and 3 spades is 5/14 (their 5 remaining cards versus their partner's 9 remaining) which is 35.7%.
July 20, 2018
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I like the first round finesse a lot holding kxx. It combines a conservative play (2nd round finesse) with the possibility that qx and qxx may duck offside (although qxx should really win if you believe partner will play high from kx). It loses to stiff q offside, but i like the odds.
June 1, 2017
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so defensive brilliancy…lho has AQx xxx x AQxxxx and he ducks the first spade. Now that's a deep one.
Nov. 5, 2016
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pass. it seems like rho has something like 2-5-2-4 or 1-5-3-4 most likely. It's possible we're going to buy the hand right here, since lho might not have much. If not, I can always compete to 3d. Hopefully the slow route doesn't lead to them doubling me for 300.
Nov. 5, 2016
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Playing dont, his bid is 2c. Playing capp, his bid is 2h. Without a convention card made out, i would assume misinformation, and look for an adjustment. I believe n/s would bid to 3s over 3h, but that west would not defend that contract. Since 3s is nearly the limit, i find the likely contract and result to be in question. Therefore, i'd give either a weighted score or e/w average minus, n/s average plus.
July 19, 2016
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To claim that your partner would “use her judgment, just like any other good player would” is faulty. I don't have to look farther than my regular partner, john hurd, to know that some good players are more aggressive than others-in particular my partner and in this exact context. While sally might pass with 9 and no 5 card suit, i've seen john jump to game with 8 and a 5 card suit-meaning that the odds of him passing a 9 count are slim. I think that knowledge is also relatable to my opponents, and should be given over when asked at any time during the play. So my response would be-he almost never passes with 9 at imps, but may be more likely at matchpoints (the huge majority of our experience together is imps).
July 19, 2016
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nice article. page 7 has an error. I enjoyed the read :)
Nov. 24, 2015
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