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All comments by John D'Errico
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As much as I would like to see this happen, it would take a huge amount of work on the part of the players to create and maintain. Even looking at the version of precision that I play with partner, we are frequently making tweaks to it. Typical system notes for a pair that play enough are often the size of a small book.
Nov. 28, 2015
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We use this in our variation of precision, and it has proven to be quite useful. Of course we use a variation over what others seem to use.

Much of the time when you open 1♣, and partner responds 1♢, you have a balanced hand, and intend to show (for us) one of the ranges 17-18 bal, or 19-20 bal, or 21-22 bal, or 23-24 bal. So, for us, the notrump ladder starts like this:

1♣ -1♢ - 1♡ - 1♠ - 1NT = 17-18, bal
1♣ -1♢ - 1NT = 19-20, bal
1♣ -1♢ - 1♡ - 1♠ - 2NT = 21 - 22, bal
1♣ -1♢ - 2NT = 23 - 24, bal

As you can see, the weaker hand always goes through the relay for us. This is because we use breakouts over the 1♡ relay. Thus, IF you have a weak hand with a long suit (6+ cards, no more than 4 HCP), you do not bid 1♠ there. Instead, you can transfer into your long suit. After the transfer, opener can ask for information about your hand with 2NT. A simple solution there is to use Ogust responses to 2NT.

So when will it be more valuable to use a breakout? A breakout is more valuable when partner has the weaker hand type. Thus you can better tolerate getting to 3♣ if partner is 19-20, then if he is 17-18. If partner is 17-18, and you are really weak, then you want to be able to stop in 2 of a minor.
Nov. 27, 2015
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Yes.
Nov. 22, 2015
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Oren and Charles have it right. While this is not a common event, there are lots of uncommon events that happen all the time. You will pick up a 7-6-0-0 hand with probability roughly 0.000056, or about once in 17600. But don't forget that there are 4 hands at every table. And if we are inspecting 36 board sets of hands as generated, then we should expect to see 7-6-0-0 hands nearly once every 100 sets of such boards.

Sorry, but this is NOT even close to a once in a lifetime event.

To make it worse, as has been pointed out, the human brain is a great thing at seeing patterns, even in randomness, where no true pattern exists. You saw a 7-6 hand, then you saw another, and another! Of course, had you seen a sequence of 8-5 hands, that would have been just as startling, and we would have seen a similar post by you on BW. There are lots of strange hands that arise every single day, once you start looking for them. And if you are simply looking for anything strange, then you will see SOMETHING.

So really, while this is a moderately rare event that happened a bit more frequently than one would normally expect, it was not that much more frequent. It is nothing terribly surprising, nor is it sufficient to make me doubt the randomness of the hand generator.
Nov. 22, 2015
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But most tournaments have no prize money. However, I suppose if you take away their Vanderbilt win, and give those who worked at catching them say a shared Vanderbilt win, I could see that.
Nov. 22, 2015
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Uber-rule?
Nov. 21, 2015
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Ron - The WBF (or ANY bridge organization) has no meaning without its membership. We need to guide these organizations to become what they should be, as without such guidance, they will do nothing. If we do not do so, then we are as much to blame. So, yes, the question is “Where do we go from here?”
Nov. 19, 2015
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Maybe yet another round of bidding, to fully bid out her shape? Just think about how nice this would be?

1♣ - pass - pass - pass
1S - etc

We will never need to worry about partner passing out those big hands of ours! Not only that, but takeout doubles would no longer be needed, since we can always show our suits, so all doubles could revert to penalty. Bidding could become far simpler.

Or how about this sequence?

1♣ - pass - pass - pass
pass - pass - 1H

We can show all sorts of hand types with this new class of delayed bids. My head simply spins with excitement.
Nov. 19, 2015
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Funny ending,
Nov. 17, 2015
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If I tell you that I had something of interest in hearts, but you have a better lead (in your opinion) then whether or not you lead the suit I signaled for, you have still obtained that information. That is information that will surely be of value later in the defense. And it is information that is not provided to your opponents, nor was it transmitted legally.

I can just see if F-S were NOT ousted after all of this. Their convention card would now also have a spot to mark for board placement signals, as well as cough signals and sweater tug signals. Would these all be pre-alerts?
Nov. 17, 2015
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While I agree with many of the points made, the 3♡ bid is something that is nice to see discussed. I know of many (beyond mere novices) who would at least consider 3♡ there. Comments like this help to make his development of the hand accessible to a wider range of readers, surely a good thing. A spare sentence or two is of little cost, since you can gloss over it if you consider the point to be obvious.

As well, remember that every bridge player is at a different stage of advancement. There are some who would be considered expert at play of the hand, yet their bidding is less than sophisticated. Those individuals might gain from that comment.
Nov. 16, 2015
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A nice hand. And a little paranoia is a good thing in bridge. After all, this is one place where at least two of the three others at the table really are always out to get you.
Nov. 15, 2015
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Nobody said to do anything that was illegal. Make your bids smoothly.
Nov. 12, 2015
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Aw, this was going to be my response. I want to (smoothly) contrive an auction where they “know” I've miscounted our aces, then I go to 7H. They will avoid the sacrifice because I should not bid Blackwood with a void, to say nothing of two voids.

Why sacrifice when they expect you are going down? In fact, you want them to drive it home with a final double when they expect you are stuck in 7H with no place to escape.
Nov. 12, 2015
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If it was a penalty card, she TRIED to play it before the last trick. I'm not sure she should get a beer for that. Or maybe she can have the beer, but before she drinks it, she needs to give it away to someone else at the table.
Nov. 12, 2015
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So, which level of bridge hell is that? Let me guess, stuck in an infinite game of bridge, where your opponents know your signals, but they use their own system of illegal signals, to which you are not privy?
Nov. 12, 2015
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Eric - You spoke out, because you must be tired about this, but he is just trying to put the right spin on the matter. Wheely, he is. :)
Nov. 12, 2015
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Roberto has absolutely no need to look at the evidence. They are such good bridge players, why would they cheat, so they must not be cheating! This is irrefutable logic.
Nov. 11, 2015
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I do agree, that it is in purely in fun to lead towards the AK tight, and tell partner to take the finesse, or to play to a stiff ace and tell him to play low. After all, bridge IS a game. If you cannot have fun playing it, then why play?

A problem arises when for example, long ago I led towards xx in dummy, and told dummy to ruff. This confused RHO, who thought I had really ruffed. (That RHO was one of the most experienced players in the room, and should have known better is only partially relevant.)

Yes, it was completely the fault of RHO. But my comment allowed him to fall asleep, and was inappropriate. When RHO did not try to win the trick, we corrected it. But even so, a comment like that can cause problems.
Nov. 11, 2015
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This is silly. Clearly the world is flat. Look on any map. Flat. Case closed.

Well usually, the world is actually poorly folded, and stuffed willy nilly into my glove compartment.
Nov. 11, 2015
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