Join Bridge Winners
All comments by John D'Errico
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Well said!
Nov. 10, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The problem is, what if someone comes along that is not yet well known, yet is good enough to play in that field? For example, we played in a Rosenblum teams a few years ago. Nobody would know who we were, yet we did reasonably well for a team of unknowns.

Worse, what happens if you personally want to exclude someone? Did someone make your enemies list? No problem. Just start up a quiet little rumor about them. Make sure that enough people hear it so that the person gets blacklisted. Who cares if your rumor is true? Who cares if your reason for this had nothing to do with bridge?

Please don't make bridge into an elitist society, where one needs to make sufficient friends in that society that you can get voted in.
Nov. 10, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
The Rosenblum teams is open entry too.
Nov. 10, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This is NOT a case of her understanding versus yours. It is the implication that together, you have a shared understanding that makes you liable.
Nov. 8, 2015
John D'Errico edited this comment Nov. 8, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
You may not have an explicit agreement, BUT if partner makes a mistaken explanation, which implies that you do indeed have an agreement, AND that agreement would lead your opponents to the wrong conclusion about your hand, then you need to say something to them as declarer before the defense begins.

You CAN correct a statement that sounds as if it WAS discussed between you, that implies something completely incorrect about your hand. You may not have gotten into trouble this time, but you surely will run into directors who will side against you.

In the end, bridge is a game where your opponents need to understand your bidding, as if they used the same set of conventions as you. Bidding is something that is not held secret from your opponents.
Nov. 8, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'll add that is works fine using Safari too.
Nov. 5, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
What he fails to do is dispute the logic that IF their bid placement correlates with their hand strength, then is clearly signaling to partner, and doing so illegally.

This is all just blowing smoke, an attempt to obscure the issue.
Nov. 5, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Double elimination would also tend to add a day I think. I do agree that it would be a good idea. I also would like to see one of the Vanderbilt/Spingold be in a slightly different format from the other, so making one of them a double elimination makes perfect sense.
Oct. 30, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As Peg says. I was once playing with a regular partner of mine. We bid a couple of games, did some things right. After two hands, one of our opponents started yelling that we were cheaters. All we did was play good, sound, reasonably high level bridge.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ray - It depends how consistently correct is that information.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It would definitely require good modeling software. The more external factors one can bring to the problem, the better your predictive ability.

For example, knowing ball spin can help to predict how the ball might bounce off the rim. Will it come down into the net, or bounce out? Knowing the air pressure in the ball will help too. I can just envision the deflate-gate scandals of tomorrow.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I was wondering about that. But the fact is, lets say that Roger Federer (or some champion with similar skills and reflexes) has an implant, that tells if the ball is going down the line or off to the side.

If you rely on sight, it turns out that your brain responds more slowly than if it is responding to some other senses. In fact, I recall reading this statement just recently, that the brain's response to a visual stimulus is slower then it is to some other stimuli, because there are more parts of the brain that need to process a visual stimulus.

So suppose you put an implant someplace where it will allow direct stimulation of some nerve, giving you an edge of perhaps 0.1 or 0.2 seconds? All it needs to tell you is left or right. But that is a massive advantage to the player who has that edge.

Similarly, there are many other sports where a fraction of a second would be crucial. Consider the football example I gave, perhaps for a wide receiver. A football play takes some seconds to develop, but much of the time, your back may be to the ball! That wide receiver is running downfield. His coverage is chasing him too, also with their back to the line of scrimmage. Knowing that the ball is coming your way, and exactly where it is going without turning your back would be an immense advantage.

I honestly don't think you can just discard this as of no value for the player.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
These would be fun problems to work on. Predicting whether a ball will drop through the hoop might be difficult due to predicting exactly how it will bounce off the rim. On top of the basic trajectory information, you would also need to know about any ball spin. I'd even bet that knowing the exact pressure in the ball might be important in many games too. As I said, interesting problems in modeling will arise.

Information given to the specs is good, although it may take away some of the fun. The postgame discussions around the water cooler might be less interesting. Would they have caught the ball if not for that pass interference? Was the ball going into the goal, or did the goalie give up a deadly corner kick for no reason?

Information used by the judges, umpires, and referees is also good. They are necessary to make the game proceed smoothly, but a referee should not be an integral part of the game.

Information given to the players is always bad. That fundamentally changes the game in ways that make it no longer the same game. Give a wide receiver in football an implant that will tell them exactly when the ball is passed, and that it was passed to them, AND that they need to run just a bit to the left? Would you give a batter in baseball the information that the pitch will be a ball, and thus they should not swing at it? Why not also tell them the ball speed too, so they can better time their swing?

At some point down that path, you might as well just put robots on the field, let them contest the game. I suppose that has the virtue of no longer needing to worry about concussions for the players, but then all games will just devolve into battlebot wars.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ha ha, but no need to alert, for those pairs who play that 3♣ would just be a correction to opener's first bid “suit”, so natural.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
We always called this reverse Fishbein.
Oct. 27, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I've been known to lapse into a vegetative state, a couch potato. So now I have the perfect excuse! NOT MY FAULT! it must be in my DNA!
Oct. 22, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ed said…. “In some jurisdictions, it is illegal to “explain” a call by naming a convention. IMO, this is good practice. Please are entitled to know what a call means. Naming it is not good enough.”

Long ago when I was just starting out in bridge. I made a Michaels cue bid. When asked what it was by one of the LOLs at our table, I described it as a Michaels cue bid. I did not know better at the time. Nothing more got said. How could I know that the LOL asker interpreted that to mean that one of us was named Michael?
Oct. 22, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
My partner the rabbit was thinking about what to lead against a 4S contract the other week. As she thinks, I'm not sure how, but a small heart falls from her hand, face up on the table. It was completely unintentional, but she had no choice about leading that card, away from her Axx suit.

Of course, dummy had QTx, declarer three small hearts, and I had the KJxx. We quickly scored up 3 heart tricks, and she has the trump Kx laying offsides, so we set the contract. Nobody else found the heart lead, so we had a cold top.

Good lead partner.
Oct. 21, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I'm sorry. But if you are bored with the lengthy spiel about something you already know, then don't listen. :) It really is not that long.

The fact is, normal behavior by many people would tend to be NOT to tell you everything you need to know. After all, if you know more about their bidding systems, then you can defend/declare better! If you understand all of the nuances of why they did or did not take a specific action (as does your partner) then you may get a better result against them. So yes, indeed, active ethics IS something we very much need to practice to overcome those basal urges.

I think it is indeed quite important to make your opponents know what you know. Those little secrets, like the fact that I use attitude leads against notrumps contracts, instead of the classically standard 4th best leads. If some declarer does not bother to learn that fact and they are left uninformed, and assumes that my deuce is from a 4 card suit, then they may be in trouble declaring 3NT if they play based on the assumption of a 4th best lead. This information, like that we play UDCA signals, are things that should be told to every player who arrives at your table. Yes, these are things they should ask! But not everyone thinks to ask every question.

In fact, I was once nastily castigated by a visiting expert player for asking a question about a bid they did not alert. I was told that if they did not alert something, then I should assume that no alert was needed. I did report this as a zero tolerance violation to the head director.

If you want secrets, then play poker. If you want a good game of bridge, where everyone is on an even footing, and the winner is determined by who handles the hand best, then play bridge, and play it ethically!
Oct. 21, 2015
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
All they would need to do is watch my play and bidding! Yup. He qualifies.
Oct. 20, 2015
.

Bottom Home Top