Join Bridge Winners
All comments by John O'Connor
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I indicated the table and the director mentioned the issue to the table and reminded them to be quiet.
Nov. 24, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
<removed as I intended this to be a reply to an earlier comment but I got that bit wrong.>
Nov. 24, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Roger Waters' mother used to play bridge at the club in Cambridge.
Oct. 16, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Alan is right - and he beat me with his post. bigdeal throws away 64 bits out of every 160 that it generates from its RNG.
Aug. 17, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Summary: I had a quick look at the documentation for bigdeal and I do not believe that this attack is a problem for bridge.

TLDR:

I do not think that this is an issue. The bigdeal software uses the same RipeMD160 crypto/hash functions as does GnuPG so you might be worried but there is a key difference.

The bigdeal documentation says that you only need 96 bits to specify a bridge deal. Their random number generator produces 160 bits at a time and they discard 64 bits and use just 96 bits. Furthermore, not all of the possible 96 bit numbers are required and, when a number outside the required range is encountered, the program will discard that result and run the RNG again.

So, even though you could take a hand and work out the 96 bit number that was used to generate that hand, you would have no way at all to work out what the missing 64 bits were and no way to know if this 96 bit number was the direct follow on from the 96 bit number of the previous hand or if there had been one or more skipped cycles between the hands.

That makes it look secure at this stage but in any case, suppose that the vulnerability did apply to bigdeal and suppose that there was some way to sidestep the missing bits and that all that you needed was 4640 bits from somewhere in the RNG output (with the gaps that we see from the previous paragraph). You would need almost 50 boards to give you enough data to predict the 51st board. So long as bigdeal was restarted with a fresh random seed for every session, there would never be enough data to allow an attack.
Aug. 17, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In my experience, I have hardly ever come upon non-white players in European clubs. Just two in the UK - one was Zia.
None, not one in Germany.
None at all in Belgium and none in France.
Down here in New Zealand? I am sure that there must be a club somewhere here that is full of hobbits and elves and even the occasional orc but in Auckland, bridge is a game for Europeans & Chinese with small numbers from Japan and the Indian sub-continent. I have seen one Maori in a tournament here and no Pacific Islanders despite those last two groups making up about a quarter of the population of Auckland.
We also have a huge gender imbalance but it runs in opposite directions. Most players of European descent are female while the opposite is true of the Chinese players.
July 22, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Nick, you are not familiar with the support profile of Chelsea FC. Most recently, Chelsea fans were caught on security cameras on the Paris Metro. They were forming a line across the doors to the carriage in which they were travelling. They were doing this to prevent non-white travelers from boarding the carriage. As they stood there, they chanted “We are racist and we are proud.”
They have a reputation that goes along with that sort of activity.
I doubt that those bridge players would have been looking for the football club.
July 22, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
That's not a death wish.
Earlier this month, on the first day of a congress, I was approached by another competitor.
She glanced down at my feet and then fixed me with a Charlton Heston thousand yard stare. With the same tone that he used when talking about having his rifle plucked from his cold dead hands, she said: “If I thought that they would fit me, I would kill you and take your shoes.”
That's me with a death wish! (And it's true.)
June 27, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I do not know. I have total trust in the TD concerned and I know that he will have acted appropriately.
June 16, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
This just happened to me. I could not play a board because the post mortem at the next table had been all too loud and clear.

I called the TD, sent my partner away from the table and explained what I had heard. The TD said that we could not play the affected hand and we, and the E/W pair against whom we should have played the board got an av+.
June 16, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
I do not want to get into a discussion about politics rather than bridge but I would like to point out that I did not say that the European Union had something to do with this. It does not.
June 6, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
As far as Bridge in Europe goes, the CAS/Olympic business is not central to the length of punishments. European laws apply as well as any CAS rulings. Indeed, the CAS is subject to European law.
A good illustration is the case of Flavio Briatore and Pat Symonds. After a race fixing incident in the Formula One World Championship, Briatore received a lifetime ban from Formula One and other FIA sanctioned events.
The offence, of planning a crash to fix a race result, was at least as bad as any of the Bridge cheating affairs and perhaps worse as it put lives at risk.
Briatore went to the French courts and the ban was reduced to five years. The CAS and the Olympic movement had nothing to do with the decision. A French court ruled that the FIA did not have the right in law to impose a lifetime ban.
The same would apply in Europe to bridge bans.
June 5, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Perhaps she can contact amazon and get them to scan a copy and sell it as a kindle ebook?
That has happened to a great many out of print books.
May 24, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In Germany, I was told that KQ in a suit was a marriage and QJ was a small marriage. A singleton or a void would be a chicane.
Clubs are brains - I can remember being asked ‘no brains partner?’
Axe or axed for double or doubled.
May 21, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ties between bridge and the Olympic movement may not mean much in your country Christopher but in many parts of the world, such ties could be very important.

The benefit could be anything from discouraging the Thai police from raiding bridge clubs to getting sales tax removed from tournament entry fees.

In many countries lotteries or liquor licensing bodies make donations to good causes - including training grants to promising young athletes. If bridge was recognised as an Olympic sport, ambitious young players might be able to apply for funding grants for tournament expenses.
April 12, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Ellis, I think that you have misinterpreted the amount. I believe it to have been written as Three Hundred Euros and zero cents.
April 12, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
It means the first time that you are caught, unless the circumstances are truly extreme as in the case of Lance Armstrong.
April 6, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
In this context, ‘suspended’ refers to the players being suspended for three years and not that their punishment is suspended as might be in the British legal system.
April 6, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Yes, a good solid verdict in a contested hearing. Bridge needed that.

I raise a glass and offer maximum respect to all those who played a part in examining hours of video to work out what was going on.
April 6, 2016
You are ignoring the author of this comment. Click to temporarily show the comment.
Bobby, thank you for this explanation:

“5. At least my opinion and, therefore, conclusion is that not all transgressions are really even close to the same, although some may disagree, especially if they only do not see much difference in what was done. In one case, performance enhancing drugs, while judged totally off limits only serves the intent to make one's body stronger enabling a consistent better and stronger performance,”

I have wondered why people whom I respect have argued so strongly that bridge cheating with signals is not the same as doping. I now see. Doping makes you a stronger cyclist but signalling does not make you a stronger bridge player.

I am not (yet) convinced that I would agree that the punishments should differ greatly but I do now see the point of the argument and I can only thank you for this explanation.
Feb. 27, 2016
.

Bottom Home Top